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SO SDD7 053A77A 1 Y. 
California State Library 



California State Library 



Accession JVo i^loOl 

Call Wo.. Re ; .Cr.-\e -£-$.. -\A 



CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY. 

This book is due on the last date stamped below. 

A book may be kept for three weeks and renewed 
for two weeks longer. 

A fine of five cents a day will be charged on over- 
due books. 




v: 



STATE 




Vol. 7, No. 1. 



San Francisco, Cal., November 4. I905- Price lO Cents. 





■ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERROIN COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
■AN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELBR, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean* 
ing out, pumping, pull* 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC 




14135J 



REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, November 4, 1905 



Number 1 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



Mari\ R. Winn. Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 



OFFICE ANT) EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

COAL1NGA. 

Price 
Gravity. per barrel. 

22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22^2 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per bbl. 

Temperature. at Pt. Hartford. 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 22j4c 

25 deg. up to, but not including 26 27y 2 c 

26 deg. up to, but not including 27 30c 

27 deg. or better 35c 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $ 1-61 

Pennsylvania 1.56 

Second Sand 1-31 

Corning 1 •"*> 

Newcastle 1-33 

Cabell l-l 6 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 39 

Indiana "" 

Somerset "3 

Ragland * 9 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1 -34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 25 

30 to 30 1-2 gravity 30 

30 1-2 to 31 gravity 35 

31 to 31 1-2 gravity 40 

31 1-2 to 32 gravity +° 

32 gravity and over 51 



The books oi a mining promoter were recently 
investigated 'n a Western mining newspaper and 
it was found that about 50 per cent of the money 
raised was used by the promoter to pay for liter- 
ature, advertising, brokerage, etc. The other 50 
per cent went into the company's treasury for the 
tU'\elnpment of the property. In other words, 
it cost the company fifty cents to raise one dol- 
lar. To many people, who do not realize the 
continual demand for capital, this will seem a 
large commission. It may be. However, the 
conditions surrounding the securing of capital for 
mining enterprises must be considered before the 
50 per cent charge is condemned. Everyone re- 
alizes that the demand for capital is always 
greater than the supply. The West is full of 
undeveloped mining prospects of unquestionable 
merit that only require capital to make them 
very valuable. The promoter is alive to this con- 
dition and makes a bid for the necessary capital. 
There are a thousand and one other promoters in 
the field for the same purpose. The promoter 
must advertise. He must pay agents who sell 
stock for him from 20 to 30 per cent. They will 
not work for less. He must pay the agent the 
commission or there will be no development fund. 
He wants the money, so he pays the commission 
either in stock or cash. If one promoter doesn't 
do this some other one will. The mining promo- 
tion business is not the only business where big 
commissions are paid. Insurance companies pay 
probably as large proportionately. Patent medi- 
cines that cost less than ten cents a bottle arc 
sold for one dollar. The buyer pays as great a 
commission on breakfast foods, dry goods and 
practically everythiing sold over the counter. It 
costs money to raise money. Investors should re- 
alize this. The promoter or fiscal agent of a 
company is entitled to a fair commission. In- 
vestors should know what commission the pro- 
moter gets and what part of their money goes 
into the ground before they buy stock. The pro- 
moter should be fair. So should the investor. 



Investors in mining and oil stocks should al- 
ways remember that poor advice is worse that no 
advice at all. There are some publishers who 
pretend to give unbiased and fearless information 
about stocks, but who in reality are swayed by 
every check for advertising that reaches their of- 
fice. The investor should base his judgment on 
facts and not on the mere statement from some 
unscrupulous publisher that this stock or that 
stock is bad. A case at point recently came be- 
fore our attention. In the query department of 
a so-called independent publication the inquirer 
is told that a certain stock is a good buy. On 
another page of the publication is a big advertise- 
ment of the promoter of the stock reported on. 
As a matter of fact there is a question whether 
or not the company owns the property it is ad- 



vertising. The editor of another reformed pro- 
motion organ, writing on the letter head of his 
publication and signing himself editor and pub-" 
lisher, occupies four typewritten pages in per- 
sonally advising the purchase of stock in a com- 
pany the property of which he has never seen. 
Another editor, who calls himself "The Tom 
Lawson of high mining finance," adopts a "holier 
than thou" pose, but at the same time fills the 
pages of his publication with questionable ad- 
vertising and indirectly endorses every mining 
stock that is properly advertised in the columns 
of his publication. Long-winded discussions de- 
signed to fool ignorant investors are carried on in 
the columns of this publication, but facts — the 
kind upon which investors can base their judg- 
ment — are eliminated. The time is coming when 
publications of this kind will be barred from the 
mails. Investors are learning to base their judg- 
ment upon facts. They are also learning to 
judge between meritorious publications designed 
to assist investors and those publications printed 
for the sole purpose of securing advertising and 
assisting unscrupulous promoters to relieve the in- 
vestor of his money. A man who has money to 
invest generally has the brains necessary to judge 
between a good and a bad stock. All he wants 
is facts. He does not need the advice of some 
subsidized publisher. 



The promoter of a much advertised and sup- 
posedly gigantic mining enterprise, when asked 
recently to give a statement of facts for the bene- 
fit of the investing public, refused to do so upon 
the ground that the names of the officers were a 
sufficient guarantee to the investor that the com- 
pany was way above the ordinary. The promot- 
er in question further stated that he did not have 
time to make a report as to the financial and 
physical condition of the enterprise. An investor 
would be foolish to invest in an enterprise of this 
kind. Big names on the directorate of a com- 
pany signify very little these days, as is shown 
by the startling exposures being made in connec- 
tion with the big life insurance companies. And 
who knows but that the big men at the head of 
the mining enterprise in question are not simply 
dummies serving as officers in order to secure the 
block of stock offered them for the use of their 
names. This condition has been found to exist 
in the case of many mining and industrial com- 
panies. However, business men, professional men 
and men of financial standing are learning to 
protect their names, and it is not now so easy to 
get a man of standing to act as a dummy director. 
Wise investors will not invest in companies where 
the fullest publicity is not given. The truth in 
the statement that publicity can do no harm to 
the honest corporation is becoming more apparent 
every day. Investors should not invest in names, 
but should base their investments upon facts. — 
Bonds and Mortgages. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Production of Petroleum in 1904 



(Continued.) 

As for the future of the Kansas petroleum 
fields, developments are bound to increase with 
the improved facilities for handling and storing 
the oil. New tankage is constanly being built 
and the producers continue to sink more wells. 
The field, as only partly developed, covers an 
area or upward of 12,000 square miles. There 
is little doubt that it will extend through the 
Indian Territory into Northern Texas, and the 
southwestern end has not as yet been found. 
Traces of petroleum are reported in many dif- 
ferent localities, and enthusiasts confidently 
assert that there are between 35,000 and 40,- 
000 square miles of probable petroleum territory 
in the mid-continent section awaiting the explor- 
ation of the drills. 

The total production of petroleum in Kansas 
for 1904 is given at 4,250,779 barrels, as com- 
pared with 932,214 barrels in 1903 and with 
331,749 barrels in 1902. The increase in 1904 
over 1903 was 3,318,565 barrels, or 356 per 
cent., the gain in 1903 over 1902 being 600,465 
barrels, or about 181 per cent. In 1903 Kansas 
ranked eighth among the oil-producing States, 
but it rose to seventh place in 1904. 

There was a heavy decline in the value of 
Kansas petroleum in 1904, the best grade, 32 
deg. Baume and above, having dropped from 
$1.36 per barrel in January to 80 cents in De- 
cember, while the lowest grade at the close of 
the year brought only 39 cents per barrel. 

Indian and Oklahoma Territories. — 
Great progress was made in the Indian and Ok- 
lahoma territories petroleum fields in 1904, al- 
though development work has been somewhat 
retarded by the almost prohibitory restrictions 
and requirements imposed upon the oil leasers by 
the Interior Department. 

A blanket lease covering the entire reserva- 
tion of the Osage Indians in Oklahoma had been 
obtained by the Indian Territory Illuminating 
Oil Company in 1896, and the developments in 
Kansas stimulated the exploration of the land 
across the border. The Osages leased their land 
for ten years at one-tenth royalty. The Illumi- 
nating Oil Company sub-leased this land at one- 
sixth royalty and a bonus of from $1 to $5 an. 
acre. These leases will expire in March, 1906, 
but operators holding partially developed prop- 
erties expect them to be renewed. Good wells 
were discovered along almost the entire run of 
lots in the eastern edge of the Osage reservation. 
For nearly seventy-five miles from the lower edge 
of Chautauqua county in Kansas to Red Fork 
in the Creek Reservation the petroleum develop- 
ment has continued with only a few breaks here 



and there. Cleveland, on the Arkansas River, 
marks the western edge of the Osage Reservation 
petroleum territory as at present developed. Oil 
has made the Osage the richest people in the 
United States, and their per capita wealth h> 
greater than that of the people of any other 
State or Territory under the American flag. 

Bartlesville is the center of petroleum opera- 
tions in the Cherokee Nation. These lands are 
directly east of the Osage Reservation and are 
doubtless just as much in oil as the sections across 
the border. They are located in the Indian Ter- 
ritory, and all leases from the original owners 
have to receive the approval of the Interior De- 
partment at Washington. Severe restrictions are 
imposed upon those leasing the lands and heavy 
forfeitures have to be deposited in order to secure 
the fulfillment of the contracts. The process of 
obtaining a lease in the Indian Territory is 
attended by so many vexatious delays and sur- 
rounded with so much red tape that the develop- 
ment of the lands of the Cherokees and the 
Creeks has been very slow. That a large area 
of land along the Verdigno River, between 
Bartlesville and Chelsea, will prove valuable for 
petroleum producing purposes seems beyond the 
possibility of any doubt. In the Creek Reserva- 
tion some very promising pools have been opened 
at Tulsa and Red Fork and Muskogee in the 
Arkansas River Valley. Following the Arkan- 
sas from Cleveland to Muskogee, a distance of 
eighty miles, there is a large scope of petroleum 
territory awaiting the drill that will be developed 
as soon as conditions become more favorable. 

The Osage Nation petroleum district of Okla- 
homa produced 56,905 barrels in 1903 and 
652,479 barrels in 1904. This represents the 
petroleum that was marketed and sold. The out- 
put would have been much better had the pipe- 
line facilities been equal to the task of handling 
the entire production. At the close of the year 
there were 243 producing wells in this field, and 
•in addition to the petroleum cared for by the 
lines a large amount had accumulated in private 
tankage. 

The Osage Reservation wells are from 1300 
to 1600 feet in depth, and the oil formation is 
quite uniform. The difference- in depth is due 
to the rolling character of the Kansas petroleum 
fields. A few deep sand wells have been drilled 
near Pawhuska, which are producing from a 
depth of nearly 2000 feet. There are also a 
few shallow sand wells south of the Kansas line, 
which find their oil in the Peru sand at a depth 
of 700 feet. The regular petroleum sand is from 
10 to 40 feet in thickness, and the gravity of the 
petroleum is from 34 deg. to 36 deg. Baume. 



The initial production of the wells varies greatly. 
While small wells are numerous, some very large 
strikes have been made, arid gushers of the 100- 
barrel an hour class are not entirely unknown. 

Muskogee in the Creek Nation marks the ex- 
treme limits of the southeastern section of the 
Indian Territory petroleum fields. Here nearly 
50 wells have been drilled and a petroleum of a 
dark green color obtained with a gravity of 42 
deg. Baume. The wells are about 1200 feet in 
depth and the oil sand 25 feet in thickness. In 
drilling about 600 feet of 6 I /J-inch casing is re- 
quired. 

Bartlesville thus far has proved the source of 
the largest supply of petroleum in the Indian 
Territory. It is also noted for several remark- 
able gas wells. A small pool of petroleum has 
also been opened up west of Chelsea and develop- 
ment promises to be quite active during the 
coming year. 

The total production of petroleum in Indian 
and Oklahoma territories in 1904 was 1,366,748 
barrels, as compared with 138,911 barrels in 
1903. 

California. — The most remarkable event in 
the production of petroleum in the United 
States in 1904 was the increase in California, 
the output amounting to 29,649,434 barrels, as 
compared with 24, 382,268 barrels in 1903. The 
early output of this State has been increasing by 
leaps and bounds since 1899. It has increased 
sevenfold since 1900. For the past two years it 
has produced more than any other State, amount- 
ing to 25.33 per cent, over one-quarter of the en- 
tire production of the United States. 

As a large percentage of the petroleum pro- 
duced is used for fuel, it was marketed at a low 
value, as nearly 63 per cent was sold at 17 1 /-; 
cents per barrel, nearly all of which was produced 
in Kern county. The highest price paid was $2 
per barrel for a small production of a superior 
grade of petroleum in San Mateo county. The 
entire value of the production in 1904 was $8,- 
265,434, which amount placed California in the 
fifth place when value of the States producing 
petroleum was considered. The average price 
paid in 1904 was close to 28 cents per barrel, 
which was a decline of about 2 cents compared 
with 1903. 

The largest percentage of gain was in Fresno, 
Santa Barbara, Ventura arid Santa Clara coun- 
ties. The only county showing a decline was 
in the small production of San Mateo. 

On December 2, 1904, a remarkable well was 
drilled in at a depth of 2860 feet, in Santa Bar- 
bara county, a few miles southeast of Santa Ma- 
ria, belonging to the Union Oil Company, which 
began producing at the rate of 10,000 barrels 
per day. The gravity is 22.8 deg. Baume. Im- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



mense quantities raited out of 

this well with the petroleum, which in a ■.Imrt 
time covered the derrick floor for a number of 
feet. At a depth of 2200 feet a deposit of petro- 
leum was found in a loose sand which would 
have made from 300 to 500 barrels per day. but 
this was cased off and the well drilled deeper. 
Owing to lack of tankage, attempts wen- made 
to "shut in" this well without success. Finallj 
the pipe parted ( )il feet from the well's mouth. 
The petroleum is now flowing out of the cracks 
in the ground at different points from 2 to 3 
rods away from the well, as well as through lead 
lines, and is collected in temporary drains across 
the canyon. 

The Union Oil Company had about 200,1)110 
barrels stored in these reservoirs and shipping by 
a pipe line to tanks at Gaviota. The Brooksline 
Oil Company had several wells near this large 
gusher, and they closed down at once. One of 
these wells afterward broke loose and started to 
flow at the rate of 4000 barrels per day. Indi- 
cations are that this territory extends from eight 
to nine miles to Lompoc, and that it will con- 
tribute largely to the production in 1905. The 
petroleum ranges from 22 deg. to 28 deg. Baume. 
The lighter grades are found in the northern por- 
tion of the field. 

There were 458 wells d-illed in 1904; of this 
number about 158 were dry, leaving 300 produc- 
tive wells. There were 252 wells abandoned. 
During the year there were 2772 wells operated 
and 647 wells shut in. About 75 per cent of the 
new wells drilled were in Kern and Los Angeles 
counties. There were 57 rigs up at the close of 
1904. There were 398 wells drilled in 1903. 
There were 75 dry holes and 77 rigs up at the 
close of the year. 

Kern County. — The Bakersfield district in 
Kern county held up its production of nearly 55,- 
000 barrels per day in a remarkable manner, al- 
though at times more than half of the wells in 
this field were shut in for want n f transporta- 
tion. The specific gravity averaged 15 1 /-; degrees 
Baume. There are over 3,000,000 barrels held 
in steel and 2,500,000 barrels held in earthen res- 
ervoirs in this field at the close of 1904. There 
are large quantities shipped north by the Pacific 
Coast Oil Company's line to Point Richmond, 
and there were from 150 to 200 tank cars shipped 
daily from this field in 1904. 

Fresno County. — The Coalinga field in 
Fresno county in 1904 more than doubled its pro- 
duction of 1903 and produced 5,114,958 barrels. 
The gravity of the petroleum produced in this 
field ranges from 12 degrees to 45 degrees Baume, 
the larger proportion being about 33 degrees 
Baume. There were 148 producing wells during 
§ 1904 and 11 wells shut in for want of transporta- 
tion. There are four pipe lines connecting this 



field with the tanks on the Southern Pacific Rail- 
\\ aj near Coalinga from 5 to 10 miles m length; 
The Pacific Coast < >il Company's branch line 
from Coalinga reaches the main line at Mcndnta 
Station. 166 miles smith of Point Richmond. In 
October a 0-ineh pipe line was completed to the 
Pacific mast at Monterey Bay, distant about 
loo miles. One of the serious obstacles to the 
more rapid development of this field is the scarcity 
of water. There is a partial supply furnished by 
two water pipe lines operated by the Coalinga 
Consolidated \\ ater Company, who secures it 
from wells in the valley. 

Los Angeles County. — The Los Angeles 
field, in Los Angeles county, in 1904 slightly 
more than maintained the production of the pre- 
vious year. The production in 1904 was 2,102,- 
892 barrels, the product of 1273 wells. There 
were 148 wells drilled and 99 abandoned during 
the year. The specific gravity averaged about 13 
degrees Baume. 

Santa Barbara County. — The production 
in this county increased 184 per cent in 1904 over 
that of 1903, owing to the immense wells opened 
up near the close of the year near Santa Maria, 
with indications of a much larger increase in 1905. 
The particulars of this well, secured by the Union 
Oil Company, have been already described. 
Wells near Summerland, in this county, have long 
been noted, owing to their being located on piles 
in the ocean. 

Ventura County. — The wells are quite 
deep in this field, many are over 2000 feet, and a 
great part of the petroleum is as light as 25 de- 
grees Baume, and some of it going up to 35 de- 
grees Baume. There was a marked increase in 
the production in 1904 over that of 1903, amount- 
ing to 47 per cent, and the price averaged close to 
90 cents per barrel, which was the highest paid 
for crude petroleum in California during 1904, 
excepting a small production in San Mateo 
county. 

San Luis Obispo County. — The report on 
the mineral resources of .the quadrangle embrac- 
ing the western- central portion of this county, by 
Mr. H. M. Fairbanks, .has recently, .been com- 
pleted, who says that important deposits of bitu- 
minous rock are chiefly found in the Pismo sand- 
stone formation, capping the Montgomery shale. 
The character of this is open and porous, readily 
absorbing the liquid bitumens, and belongs to the 
Miocene age. There are numerous springs of 
petroleum and deposits of asphalt, from a thick 
tarry mass to' a solid. No productive wells have 
as yet been drilled in this quadrangle, although 
there are many indications of large deposits of 
petroleum in the sand where structural condi- 
tions are favorable. 

The immense production of heavy petroleum 



in California in l l )04. amounting to about 2}.- 
OOOjOOO barrels, which represents (..390,000 tons 
of coal, such as was used in California, has solved 
the cheap fuel problem for the Pacific Coast, and 
has opened up the possibilities of it becoming a 
great manufacturing district. 

Probably no more striking way of actually 
showing the relative commercial value of coal and 
oil as fuel could be presented than by stating that 
the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Com- 
pany made the following comparative tests of the 
cost per train mile of coal costing $6.65 per ton, 
and petroleum costing $1.33 per barrel: 

Twenty-five passenger and freight engines on 
a thirty-day run used 2077 tons of oil and trav- 
eled 87,063 miles, or 419 per ton, or 3500 miles 
per month per engine. Oil at $1.33 per barrel 
would at this figure cost 14.4 cents per mile. 
Twenty-five passenger and freight engines (same 
days, same track, and same condition) burning 
coal, cost 23.2 cents per mile. The oil was 15 
degrees Baume. This shows a saving for oil of 
38 per cent, and the experiment was tried with 
coal at $6.65 per ton; 4.1 barrels being equivalent 
to one ton of coal. 

In this extended and practical test the cost of 
the oil per barrel was one-fifth of the cost of coal 
per ton, while the resulting gain for oil was 38 
per cent. Stated in another form, the value of 
the two fuels would be the same when the price 
of the coal in tons was three and one-half times 
the price of the oil in barrels. 

The Southern Pacific Railway has changed 780 
of their locomotives from coal to petroleum fuel 
out of 1350. Those on the Ashland division 
north of Ashland continue to burn coal. 

There are now 140 steamers, large and small, 
using petroleum that ply in and out of San Fran- 
cisco, aggregating about 130,000 gross tons. 
There are petroleum fuel storage stations at the 
Hawaiian Islands and Alaska, also at a number of 
ports in Asia, but most of the steamers take suffi- 
cient petroleum fuel to make the outward and 
return trip. 

One of the most interesting tests of petroleum 
fuel on ocean freighters was accomplished in 1904 
when the steamship Nebraska, owned by the 
American Hawaiian Company, steaming from 
San Francisco by way of Cape Horn to New 
York and return, with petroleum fuel that was 
stored in her double bottom and in a large tank, 
loaded at San Francisco on the outward trip, 
making a run of 26,000 miles in one hundred and 
five days, returning June 12, 1904. Only one 
stop was made on the outward journey, in the 
Straits of Magellan, owing to severe weather, the 
Nebraska being the first vessel burning petroleum 
fuel to pass these straits. This is probably the 
longest trip on record made without any supplies 
from way stations. 

Petroleum fuel is being introduced into smel- 
ters in California and in Arizona, and has for sev- 
eral years superseded coal to a very great extent 
in the generation of steam. 

(Continued.) 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



News from the Field 



DIVIDENDS. 

Oil companies listed on the California Stock 

and Oil Exchange have declared dividends as 

follows : 

Peerless Oil 1 + 

Claremont Oil 01 

Kern River 15 

Hanford Oil 2.00 



COAL1NGA. 



Coalinga, Cal., Nov. 1. — The Missouri 
Coalinga Oil Company have started to deepen 
their well with the expectation of getting a 
higher gravity of oil. While they had a well 
that would probably produce 500 barrels, its 
gravity was not high enough for the Standard 
to accept. 

Wabash Oil Company's well No. 6 is 900 
feet deep with 10-inch casing and work is pro- 
gressing. 

Arline Oil Company have been successful in 
getting the 6-inch drive pipe out of their No. 1 
well, and are now working with the 8-inch with 
the hope of pulling that out. 

W. K. No. 1 have put in their 6-inch drive 
pipe to a depth of 2380 feet and are now drill- 
ing ahead. 

Mr. J. W. Pauson returned to San Fran- 
cisco Monday after having spent several days 
in the field, relieving Mr. T J. Turner, who has 
been in the city seeking medical attention for his 
eyes. 

Kaweah well No. 2 is having its derrick re- 
paired, which will delay work for the next 
couple days. At the present time they are 1250 
feet deep with 10-feet deep with 10-inch casing. 

Since the M. K. & T. Oil Co. put a packer 
in their well No. 1, it has flowed steadily, and 
their reservoir No. 1 is now full, and oil is run- 
ning into No. 2. 

Sunday afternoon, while tubing well No. 8 
of the Caribou Oil Mining Company was being 
pulled the workmen suddenly discovered that the 
derrick was on fire. So rapidly was the progress 
of the flames that one of the men who was in 
the derrick barely had time to come down and 
escape. When first discovered the fire was at 
the band whell and it is generally supposed that 
the fire originated in the engine house through 
gas escaping and becoming ignited. The derrick 
is a total loss. 

The California Oilfields, Ltd., Company has 
a derrick directly opposite the one that was de- 
stroyed by fire on the Caribou Oil Mining Com- 
pany's property, and it was only by the most 
strenous effort that it was saved from destruction, 



as it caught fire several times, but fortunately the 
employees were able to put it out before it got 
beyond control. 

Mr. J. M. Sands, treasurer of R. H. Herron 
Company, W'as in Coalinga this week. 

R. H. Herron Company is putting in a new 
boiler on the Ellis property on section 31, which 
they recently bought. 

Mr. T. J. Turner returned from the city 
Monday, where he has been for several days. 



SANTA MARIA. 



THE UNION OIL CO. 

Of all the companies in the Santa Maria fields 
the Union Oil Co. is the largest and the best 
equipped for delivery as well as production of oil. 
Two of their leases adjoin the Pinal Oil Co. and 
they have the same high grade of oil and heavy 
producing wells, but more of them, and their one 
Hartnell gusher still outdoes everything in the 
field. The Union Oil Co. also controls large 
holdings in the Lompoc Anticline and elsewhere 
in this north and westerly end of Santa Barbara 
County. It has large tracts of as yet unworked 
fields; but it has sufficiently developed and proven 
territory to bore hundreds of wells when found 
necessary. 

Their large developments on the Santa Maria 
anticline, the number of men and their families, 
justified them in laying out a town six miles 
south of Santa Maria on the Pacific Coast Com- 
pany's (narrow gauge) line, known as Orcutt. 
This name was given it to remember their head 
geologist and expert, W. W. Orcutt, who made 
all their locations for them. 

It is but a little over two years since this field 
was first opened up, and the field is a hive of in- 



large oil well supply companies have their per- 
manent branch offices there — the National Supply 
Co., Fairbanks, Morse & Co., and Herron & 
Co. A number of residences have been erected 
by the company for their men, besides numbers 
of private dwellings, the usual amount of stores 
and shops; recently a new school house and 
church have been added. A number of large 
tanks (35,000 barrels capacity) have been erected 
on the line of the railroad as reservoirs for their 
field one to two miles further above the town. 
Some of their wells, notably those on the Hobbs 
lease, can run by gravity direct to Port Harford 
through their own pipe line, which we shall refer 
to again. 

The field is managed by P. P. Hill, an affable, 
pleasant superintendent, and who is most thor- 
oughly familiar with every detail of his work. 
The company has been exceptionally successful 
in this field, not a single dry well has been en- 
countered; no serious difficulties have been met 
in boring their wells, though some of them are 
over 3000 feet deep. The Santa Maria field is 
noted for its deep wells, but as more than com- 
pensation for deep borings is the great produc- 
tivity of the wells; the permanency of which 
seems assured by the depth of the oil-carrying 
formations, covering from 100 to 200 feet of the 
range of the pipe. 

Different gravities of oil are encountered, but 
the quality is all in the better gravities. The 
Hartnell on the west gives 25 degree, and the 
east end of the field as high as 29 degree gravity. 
Some of their wells, as in other fields, stopped 
at the first oil-bearing stratum, ranging around 
1600 or 1700 feet. They are now engaged in 
deepening a number of these wells. The advan- 
tage in deepening is the finding of light oils and 
what is still more, the greater producing wells. 
A shallow well that averages 50 to 75 barrels 
will yield 300 barrels or more on going deeper. 
On the Hobbs lease the average yield of the 
wells is 250 barrels per day; and what is known 



dustry. The town shows a steady growth, ma 

chine shops have been established there, the three as Hobbs No. 6 actually flows 800 barrels per 



WESTERN IRON STEEL 

THIRD OFFERING 

Notice is hereby given that offers for public subscriptions to the "Western Iron Steel" stock 
at Fifteen Dollars per share, present offering limited to One Thousand shares, will be received at 
the Company's office, 817 to 823 James Flood Building, San Francisco, until 12 o'clock noon, 
Tuesday, November 5th. Subscriptions must be accompanied by checks to the order of said 
company for five per cent of amount subscribed, balance payable ten days after date of allotment. 
The right is reserved to reject any subscription in whole or in part. Full particulars can be ob- 
tained at the Company's office. 

The first offering of One Thousand shares a Five Dollars per share and the second offering 
of One Thousand shares at Ten Dollars per share were many times over subscribed. 



PACIFIC Oil. REPORTER 



ila\. The Jrpth »i these wells is of little ex- 
pense in getting out thr oil, as the) are all under 
a hen>\ g.is pressure ami Mem out without pump- 
ing, and when pumped it accelerates the yield. 

In a previous issue we referred to the llart- 
nell gusher. This is a phenomenal well of the 
Union Company. Eleven months ago it started 
to spout and still gushes out a large volume of 
oil. At first it was about 8000 barrels, and it 
still yields between 2000 and ?()00 barrels daily. 

The Union Oil Co. has recently acquired the 
adjacent territory of the Santa Maria Oil and 
Gas Co.. also a smaller tributary field known as 
the Folsom lease. The Union ha- large holdings 
in the Lompoc anticline, about 10 miles further 
south over another ridge. This is, however, con- 
nected by a pipe line with the Orcutt reservoirs. 
The Lompoc field has 10 deep, producing wells 
and five more are being drilled. These producing 
wells are not being used at present, being held 
as a reserve for future increasing demands. 

The oil in this field is both good refinable oil 
and fuel oil, an advantage it possesses over most 
other fields. Having both qualities it has a 
larger field of usefulness and profit. Some of 
the lighter gravity oils are excellent distillate and 
gasoline producers when refined. So far .no re- 
fining is done here, the crude oil being shipped 
from Port Harford (the end of their pipe line) 
to their Los Angeles refineries when wanted. 
The Pinal Oil Co. (adjacent to this field) made 
a thorough analysis of the lighter gravity oils, 
and found it possessed of a large percentage of 
coal oil, gasoline and other light oil products. 

To the many far-sighted enterprises of this 
company must be added their outlook for ready 
shipping facilities. Only recently the disputed 
claims of the Marre estate along San Luis Bay 
have been amicably settled. 

The Union Oil Co. has acquired title from the 
Marre estate to the disputed pipe line right of 
way, also for very ample tankage ground near 
Port Harford, and for several acres of valuable 
water front on San Luis Bay, part of the site 
of Avila. The appreciation of this locality for a 
water front and wharf is to be realized when the 
fact that that county just recently voted to bond 
itself heavily to build a public wharf from an 
adjacent locality. The county of San Luis 
Obispo has as yet no public landing place to its 
only valuable port of San Luis Bay. Port Har- 
ford is owned exclusively by the Narrow Gauge 
company and the steamship line. We consicV 
that this is one of the best moves of the Union 
Oil Co. in its successful ventures connected with 
the Sarita Maria field. The whari is about 35 
miles distant from its wells, and most of its oil 
is of sufficient light gravity to require but little 



pumping. It owns its nun steamer lines and 
through these shipping facilities is in a \rrv in- 
dependent position, bringing the oil in I. own 
pipe line to this const landing point. 

Some of its surplus it sells to the Standard 
Oil Co. This is the only relationship the Union 
hears to the Standard, a very reasonable one. Its 
tankage and shipping location on San Luis Bay 
are separate and distinct, as are also their reser- 
voirs and pipe lines. Much sensational talk was 
indulged in several months ago in the Examiner 
regarding tin's company which had not the least 
bit of foundation in fact. 

The executive officers of the Union are all 
Los Angeles men, it is a stock company and has 
other oil holdings. This we believe is their 
largest field and Surely it has the greatest of 
promises. Actually only a very small part of tht 
field is yet developed. 

Lyman Stewart is the president; Giles Kellog, 
secretary; W. L. Stewart, general manager; W. 
W. Orcutt, head geological department, and J. 
S. Tbrrence, manager financial department, all 
of Los Angeles, and F. F. Hill of Orcutt, field 
manager. L. E. B. 



KERN COUNTY. 



Bakersfield, Cal., Nov. 3, 1905. 

The price of Kern River oil has not advanced 
with the beginning of November. No one expect- 
ed any advance of note, although prices have been 
considerably advanced in all other oil fields of 
the country with the exception of California. 
The present low schedule of prices may be ex- 
pected to continue until the production of Kern 
River falls off much more, or the consumption 
makes larger gains than during the past year. 

To the oil operator who is selling oil at cost, 
or less, the prices now prevailing are much too 
low, but there seems to be no remedy in sight. 
The consumer is getting his oil at much less than 
he could afford to pay, but unless some other 
methods in the marketing of oil come into use he 
will in all events continue to get oil at less than 
the actual cost of production. 

The transportation companies have nothing to 
lose by the consumer having to pay more for fuel 
oil, as they get the same tariff for hauling a bar- 
rel of ten-cent oil to market as they would for a 
barrel of fifty-cent oil. On the contrary, as large 
consumers of fuel oil, it is to their advantage to 
have as low a price prevailing as possible on ac- 
count of the additional profit they make in using- 
oil in lieu of coal. The middlemen make about 
the same profit on cheap oil as they would on 
higher priced, and a much more per cent profit. 
Ten cents profit on a barrel of ten-cent oil is much 



more profit than fifteen cents cm fifty-cent oil. 
While the advantage to the consumer at the 
hover prices induces others to change from coal 
fuel to oil, a higher price would not materially 
effect the increase in oil installations. 

The various middle men are not concerned 
about the producer. Not being producers and 
making larger sales and per cent of profit on 
cheap oil than on dear, it is also to their advan- 
tage to keep the price as low as possible. With 
conditions like this it is no wonder that no one 
tries to help the poor producer out in getting 
more for his product. 

The Kern River producer has been looking to 
the Standard, Associated, Union, Southern Pa- 
cific and other large users, consumers and sellers 
of fuel oil to go down into their pockets, and, out 
of the generosity of their hearts, pay them more 
for their production than they have to. Dur- 
ing the past two years none of the above named 
companies have evidenced any inclination what- 
ever to help the downtrodden producer out of the 
hole, and great is the howl of discontent. 

The sooner the producers of California wake 
up to the situation and find out there isn't another 
class of people in the entire State thar Would be 
benefited by an increase in price but themselves, 
and quit' expecting consumers to voluntarily pay 
more than they have to, and get to work and 
evolve some method to raise the price, then, and 
not until then, will oil conditions in the valley 
fields improve. The writer has no suggestions to 
make as to what this scheme might be, but one 
thing is certain as fate, and that is the remedy 
will have to be devised by the producers, and car- 
ried through in face of opposition from every con- 
sumer, carrier and dealer in fuel oil in the State 
of California. 

The producer of the Kern River field is in a 
hole. He put himself there, and no one else is 
interested in getting him out, and if he ever gets 
out he will have to get out by himself and not 
with the assistance of all his natural enemies, 
whom he seems to think should throw out a life 
line and haul him into the safe harbor of high- 
priced oil and prosperity. 

It is up to the producer to get busy. No one 
else cares whether or not he gets cost for his oil 
or whether he gets together in a combination, 
enters the market himself, shuts down until the 
consumer has to pay more for oil or do without. 
He is going to stay in the very same hole he has 
been in for the past two years unless he rigs up 
some sort of rope to haul himself out. 

The present conditions should be favorable for 
such a move. The excess of production over con- 
sumption is not over 10.000 or 12.000 barrels per 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



day, while the entire stock of stored oil in the 
State of California is hardly equal to a six 
months' supply. 

Conditions of the oil business in the State are 
well known to every one interested in the business 
and it is well known that consumption is very 
near up with the production. 

With this condition of affairs and no surplus 
stock on hand it does seem that some means could 
be arrived at that would give the producer more 
for his oil than actual cost of production. 

New development work has been very slow. 
Peerless Oil Co. has finished one well and started 
the drill crew on a new rig. Imperial and Thir- 
ty-Three companies have several strings of tools 
running, but outside of this practically no new 
work at all has been commenced during the past 
month. 

Both the deep wells are shut down waiting for 
more pipe. The Carman well will commence 
drilling within the next week. This well has 
now reached a depth of 2900 feet, and Mr. Car- 
man thinks with the string of pipe he is now 
putting in he will be able to drill several hundred 
feet deeper, or until the deep oil sand is found 
in paying quantities. The Petroleum Develop- 
ment well on 24 is waiting for a string of extra 
heavy drive pipe, the ordinary pipe heretofore 
used not being found strong enough to stand the 
strain of drilling in the very difficult formation 
this well is now in. 

The average daily production of the Kern 
River field for the month of October is estimated 
to have been but very little short of 40,000 bar- 
rels per day, of which little has gone into storage. 
The Union Oil Co. will finish its 500,000 bar- 
rel reservoir within the next two or three weeks. 
President Stewart of this company states in an 
interview in the local press that his company has 
no intention whatever of entering the Kern River 
field as an active competitor of the Associated as 
a purchaser of fuel oil. He states that the cost 
of getting the Kern River Oil Co. to tidewater 
and the present low price at which oil is being 
sold in the larger markets does not offer any in- 
ducements for the Union Oil Co. to enter the 
Kern River field as a buyer of oil. 

The Associated Oil Company's reservoir, now 
nearing completion, will enable the Independent 
Producers' Agency to dispose of any surplus oil 
they have in tanks on the different leases. This 
reservoir will not be completed for a matter of 
two or three weeks. Work has already been 
commenced on still another reservoir for the As- 
sociated. 

In the Sunset field the Webb-Foot Oil Syndi- 
cate, which has been drilling for some time in 
the hills back of Sunset some 17 miles, is now 



shut down waiting fo- a string of drive pipe. 
This well has reached a depth of about 1800 feet 
and the company has strong hopes it will succeed 
in finding oil to justify the great expense it has 
been put to in drilling this well. 

Many cars of ties for the Sunset extension have 
been shipped into Sunset during the past few 
weeks. The chance of this extension being fin- 
ished within the next few months looks bright 
now. 

The Fearless Oil Co. at McKittrick will soon 
commence spudding in on the test well to be 
drilled north of McKittrick territory proper. 
This well will be carried to a great depth unless 
oil is found to extend north of the McKittrick 
field and can be found without drilling to a 
great depth. 

No well has been drilled in this territory, most 
of the wells on the outskirts of the field having 
been put down west and south of this location 
several miles distant. 

McKittrick is doing nothing at all in the way 
of new work, not a single string of tools outside 
of the Fearless being at work in this field. 

The Chansloi-Canfield Midway Oil Company 
continues to keep several strings busy on the 
property and by the time the railroad reaches the 
main camp will have considerable production to 
begin with. C. W. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



The Bullfrog Extension Mining Company last 
week shipped a 25-horse power gasoline hoist, 
with additional cars, track and supplies, to its 
mine at Bullfrog, Nevada. 

The values in the tunnel are increasing as 
depth is obtained. They now report a ledge of 
more than 40 feet, all of which is milling ore of 
the value of $14 to $20 per ton, with a streak 
four feet wide which was found in the upraise 
of the tunnel, that assa3's an average of $120 per 
ton, with picked samples as high as $1,000 per 
ton. 

As soon as the hoist is installed, all the men 
that can be used to advantage will be put into 
the mine to develop it as rapidly as possible. 

The company is building a number of houses 
as winter quarters for the miners. It has also 
started shaft No. 2 at the west end, on the south 
side of its Delaware No. 2 claim. This shaft is 
about 50 feet from the shaft which was sunk 

Three hundred and twenty acres of oil land, 
lying in the Kern River oil belt — S. % Section 9, 
T. 31, R. 29 E. M. D. B. & M.— for sale at 
a bargain. See us at once or write 



on the Bullfrog Fraction, which at a depth of 
30 feet struck a ledge almost four feet in thick- 
ness, with the green ore characteristic of the 
Original Bullfrog Fraction, that assays from 
$128 to as high as $2,671 per ton. The Bull- 
frog Extension expects to strike the same ledge 
within the next ten days, as they are working a 
double shift of men. 

The Goldfrog Big C. Mining Company has 
just shipped in cars, track and materials for its 
tunnel work on its property that lies just north 
of the Original Bullfrog, and adjoins on the 
northwest the Bullfrog Extension Mining Com- 
pany. The tunnel has reached a depth of 150 
feet, and has passed through talc formation of 
seven feet, carrying good milling values. 

The well on the Higgins tract, near Carpen- 
teria, is down 2265 feet with good indications. 
The well is one of the deepest yet drilled in the 
section, but will be carried 3000 feet if oil is not 
encountered before. 

The Kern River Oil Company's dividend of 
15 cents per share on the capital stock of the 
company, amounting to $3000, is now pay- 
able. 

Pennsylvania oil now brings $1.61 a barrel, a 
quotation which has not been witnessed since 
April, 1904, when the price range was from 
$1.62 to $1.65. The advance of ten cents a bar- 
rell in the price of second sand production is par- 
ticularly encouraging to oil operators in our im- 
mediate vicinity. The situation appears very fav- 
orable for the oil producers in all the Eastern 
districts. The foreign demand for American oil 
has been unprecedented, and ports which have 
been dominated by the Russian product for years 
are again open to refined oil manufactured in 
the United States. A shipment of over a million 
gallons of illuminating oil was recently forward- 
ed to Mediterranean ports, which, for a number 
of years, have received their entire supplies from 
the Russian oil fields. The scarcity of high grade 
oil is also a factor in the situation and the dis- 
covery of a new pool of large dimensions would 
be most opportune. There is a limit, however, 
to all things and the conservative operator will 
profit by his jvist experiences and make the most 
of the present situation. 

At a meeting of the stockholders of the Atchi- 
son, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company 
held in Topeka, Kansas, recently, it was admitted 
that the Standard Oil Company owns $27,000,- 
000 of a totalof $116,000,000 of common and 
preferred stock. This was brought out by a re- 
mark of one of the directors that the reason the 
Southern California Railway Company was not 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



taken into the Santa Yt system at the last meet- 
ing was due to the Standard Oil interest 
being represented. With the Standard Oil's 
holdings represented at the recent meeting the 
necessary three-fourths vote was obtained and 
the Southern California road taken in. 

The annual report of the Peerless Oil Com- 
pany has been sent out to the stockholders and 
it shows that in the six years of the company's 
existence it has acquired property of an estimated 
value of $443,538.51 ; paid out for operating ex- 
penses, including superintendence, $371, 598. 84; 
it has taken from all sources $1,321,671.72, and 
has paid out in dividends $502,000, leaving an 
undivided profit in the treasury of $4,534.37. 

Up to September 30, 1905, the Peerless had 
delivered 4,382,850 barrels of oil to the Standard 
Oil Company on its 9,000,000 barrel contract 
at 20 cents, and the report expresses the belief 
that the company's land in the Kern River field 
alone will more than produce enough oil to com- 
plete the contract. 

For the past eighteen months the Fulton wells 
have paid the company's expenses, and as soon as 
the work of financing the Coalinga-Peerless Com- 
pany is complete, new work will be started on 
the Fulton wells. 

Experiments made by the Adeline and other 
companies have shown that improved methods 
of pumping will greatly overcome the difficulty 
experienced in producing oil of the heavy, viscous 
character of the Fulton Company's oil, and by 
these new methods the production of the Fulton 
wells will doubtless be materially increased. 

The report also shows a gratifying condition 
in the Coalinga-Peerless property, and says that 
the 100,000 shares of stock which the Peerless 
holds in the Coalinga-Peerless is one of the most 
valuable assets of the parent company. 

On October 26th Hanford Oil Company paid 
a dividend of $2 per share on the capital stock of 
the company, amounting to $4000. 

A special report of the Mexican Petroleum 
Company has been issued by President Doheny 
of that company, reviewing the recent contract 
to supply the Mexican Central Railroad with 
fuel oil. The company has delivered 120,000 
barrels up to August 1st, for most of which pay- 
ment has been made. 

Swayne & Hoyt of this city have secured ex- 
clusive privileges to ship Oriental cargoes to this 
port from the Asiatic coast in the tank steamers 
Winnebago, Dakotah and Appalachee, of the 
Standard Oil Company's fleet, which have here- 
tofore returned in ballast after carrying oil car- 
goes to the Far East. The steamers coming this 
way under this arrangement will be known as 
vessels of the Oriental Pacific Company. 




Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

s: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 384 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARLESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, Fl Q n Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, WT fil K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I \XU PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 




CAR TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



FOR ALL USES 



We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mout. on wood or steel underframes. 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oi 
of all sizes up to and inclnding 

66,000 BARRELS 



on lefioeries Complete Oar Specialty 



WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE AND WORKS:— WARREN, OHIO 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Eucalyptus Compound for 
Oil Field Boilers 



One of the gravest problems which faces all 
steam users in the oil fields and alkali districts in 
California, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and other 
Western States, is scale formation in boilers. In 
some districts this scale accumulates so rapidly 
that engineers often partly blow off their boilers 
every hour, thereby wasting at least 50 per cent 
of the steam developed by their boilers. 

To remedy the above, hundreds of devices have 
been tried — water purifiers, boiler compounds, 
soda, coal oil, mechanical scrapers, etc. — and all 
have been found to have some good points and 
a great many bad ones. Engineers have in most 
cases given up the idea that anything .can be 
used which will keep their boilers free of scale, 
which would enable them to get the full efficiency 
from them. 

Soda in boilers is not practical, and as nearly 
all boiler compounds contain acids, they, if used 
to any extent, will not only remove scale, but 
also destroy packing and in time injure the boiler 
itself. 

The ambition of most American manufacturers 
of boiler compounds, who make it a practice of 
filling their circulars with glowing testimonials, 
is to head the list with any of the different de- 
partments of the U. S. Navy, and they all try 
from time to time to introduce their products by 
offering same free to the different Navy Yards 
and departments for tests. In most cases they 
do not even get a trial, for after the Government 
chemists analyze their compounds, injurious 
components and acids are found which would 
injure metal. Other compounds which do not 
contain acids, are invariably ineffective and con- 
sequently are also discarded. 

The only boiler compound used and which has 
successfully been passed on by the Steam Engi- 
neering Department of the United States Navy 
is the "Noscale" Eucalyptus Boiler Compound. 
It was originally tested and adopted at the U. S. 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STAVES and HEADING 

Fop Both Tight and Slack Work . 



OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 



White Spruce Saves and Heading 
all ready to set up for Fish, 
Pickles or Lard packages of 
any size. 



Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 
Heading for Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Beef, Etc., Etc. 



Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous .Attention to att Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Honlton.Ore. 



EXCEPTIONAL BARGAIN IN PROVEN 
OIL PROPERTY. 

Forty acres of one-eight royalty leased land in 
the heart of the Coalinga oil field on which four 
good wells have been developed, running in pro- 
duction from 50 to 300 barrels each. Oil con- 
tracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation 
Company at 19 cents per barrel, contract to run 
until February 1, 1906. Contract with Independent 
Oil Producers Pipe Line Company at 25 cents per 
barrel to commence immediately upon expiration 
of present contract. Property free from debt. 
Well equipped with tools, and all apparatus for 
operating property. 

The present owners wish to dispose of the above 
property for the reason that they are not familiar 
with the oil business and do not feel competent to 
operate to the best advantage. It can be secured 
under very favorable terms — part cash and the 
balance on such terms as the purchaser may wish. 
Security in note, stock or bonds or good realty 
property accepted. 

Full particulars will be gladly furnished on ap- 
plication, either personally or by letter. Com- 
munications should be addressed to, F. S. F., care 
PACIFIC OIL, REPORTER. 318 Pine St., San 
Francisco. 



AT A BARGAIN. 

Complete Standard Drilling Rig, with large 
quantity of casing. This outfit was used to drill 
one hole 1200 feet and is practically as good as new. 
Part of casing never in hole. Outfit cost over 
$12,000. "We are enabled to offer it at a fraction of . 
this amount. Full particulars together with in- 
voice on file at this office. Call or write, PACIFIC 
OIL REPORTER, 318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

STAR RIG FOR SALE. 

We have had placed in our hands a No. 7 Star 
Drilling Rig, Boiler on separate frame, Bits from 
14 to 5% inch, 1600 feet wire drilling cable, 2x3x7 
and 3x4x7, boxes and pins, together with all fit- 
tings for a complete drilling outfit for drilling to 
a depth of 1600 feet. Is in excellent condition and 
stored close to railroad station. A barga'.n 'for 
anyone requiring an extra heavy portable rig at 
low cost. PACIFIC OIL REPORTER, 

318 Pine St., San Francisco. 




Car Tank mounted on Steel Car 

Pennsylvania Specifications Throughout 



OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Oup "Steel t* Steel" joints guaranteed not ta leaV. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern BIdg., 
Chicago, Ills. 




ALL 
UP 
OIL WELL TO 

SUPPLIES DATE 

R. H. HERRON CO. 




FISHING TOOLS 
FOR RENT 

509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



1! 



Yard at Marc Island. Ctl., tests covering 
a period of three months, anil is mm bnr 
stantly in use in most departments. 

The action of the compound is to gradually 
loosen and dissolve all scale in boilers, leaving it 
in such a condition that it is readily blown off. 
Being made from Eucalyptus leaves, it is an 
absolutely pure vegetable product, containing no 
acids or foreign matters, and consequently unin- 
jurious to metal ami packing, and. unlike other 
compounds, it can be used in large quantities 
without any fear that it will cause foaming, and 
when used constantly in clean boilers it will pre- 
vent the formation of scale. 

Another peculiar feature of the "Noscale" Eu- 
calyptus Boiler Compound which greatly en- 
hances its value to steam users, is a thin vege- 
table-like coating which it leaves in the interior 
of the boiler or tubes of the boiler, which, besides 
preventing the adherence of scale, prevents pitt- 
ing, corrosion and galvanic action. This fact 
alone makes it a highly prized compound to en- 
gineers' who use it. 

After several successful tests in the oil fields, 
mainly by the Coalinga-Peerless Oil Co. and 
others, it has been thoroughly demonstrated that 
this compound will, if properly used according to 
directions, clean scale deposited from alkali waters 
with good results to the boiler shell. 

The California Engineers Supply Co., of 
which Adolph A. Stone, an old time oil man, is 
sales manager, is the only manufacturer of pure 
Noscale Eucalyptus Boiler Compound. It also 
manufactures the highest grade Eucalyptus oils 
for medicinal uses. 



Decline in Petroleum Pro- 
duct 



Almost simultaneously with the news of the 
great Russian oil field disaster comes the infor- 
mation that the production of the American oil 
fields east of the Rocky Mountains is declining. 
The same may be said of the California fields, 
but as their supply does not affect the markets of 
the Central West and the East, it need not be 
taken into consideration. The fact, briefly 
stated, is that there is a general falling off in 
production in all the fields, and this in spite of 
the increased activity that has been stimulated by 
the higher crude markets. Not alone in Pennsyl- 
vania and West Virginia but as well in Ohio, 
Indiana, Kansas and Texas, the results of late 
have not been encouraging. Wells that started 
producing at a rapid rate soon decline to small 
proportions, and although new work is constantlj 
projected it does not make up for the loss by the 
yeason of the old wells running out. At this 
rate of decline in a short time the "overproduc- 



Ever Bought Mining Stock? 
Been Reading of Bullfrog? 

Have you read of the famous strike of rich tellurium ore, assaying 82 per cent 
pure gold, on the property of the Bullfrog Extension Mining Company? 

Have you read the story of the exploration of the Comstock gold and silver belt 
in Nevada, now found to be 400 miles long and 150 miles wide? 

Have you a knowledge of the fortunes that have been made and lost in gold and 
silver mining and are now in the making or losing? 

Are you able to discriminate and to decide between good and bad mining stock 
investments? 

We have the facts and You 
Should Know The Truth 

Write today for booklet and prospectus of the Bullfrog Extension Mining Com- 
pany. They give you a pen-picture of what is now the scene of the 
greatest gold mining excitement the world ever saw, and tell you facts 
that may mean the laying of the foundation of your personal fortune. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 



Rialto Building, A 10 



San Francisco, Cal. 



MANANA 

is the time many of you are going to advertise. Ma nana is Spanish for the time that never 
comes — to-morrow. 

New possibilities and opportunities for business development come only to those who act 
to-day. 

If a thing is worth doing at all it is worth doing now. The main thing is to make a 
start. To begin advertising to-day instead of to-morrow brings results one day nearer — or brings 
you one day nearer finding out if results are to be had. It identifies you one day earlier as one 
of the old advertisers who have built up a prosperous business by judicious advertising. To 
begin to-day gets you in touch with people who are going to buy, next week or next month, 
just the kind of a machine you sell. 

Change your advertising copy frequently. If you should see the same news printed in 
your morning paper day after day you would soon stop reading it and get another. Just the 
same'with the man who reads your advertisement. If he sees the same ideas expressed each 
week you lose his attention. Change your copy frequently and the results of your advertising 
will increase. 

Call upon us for advertising rates and particulars, and do it to-day. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tion of oil" that we have heard so much about 
will be a thing of the past. 

Latest reports from Texas indicate that the 
gross output of the various oil fields of that State 
and Louisiana in September shows a decline. 
Especially is this true of Humble and Jennings. 
Humble was credited with 1,700,000 barrels in 
August and 1,276,000 in September, an appar- 
ent decrease of 424,000 barrels. Jennings made 
about 1,300,000 barrels in August and dropped to 
698,700 barrels in September, a decrease of 231,- 
300 barrels. In August the aggregate output of 
all the fields was put at 3,503,500 barrels, and 
the figures for September are 2,821,700 barrels, 
indicating a decrease of 681,800 barrels. 

Similar conditions prevail in other oil States. 
The tendency is toward smaller production even 
in Kansas and the Territories where the flow 
of oil in the recent past has been so large as to 
threaten the producers with starvation. 



W. K. OIL COMPANY. 

Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Coal- 
inga, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors, held on the 12th day of October, 1905, 
.in assessment of two and one-half cents (2%c.) 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the 
W. K. Oil Company, payable immediately to J. 
W. Pauson, Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, Room 501 Parrott building. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
22d day of November, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 15th 
day of December, 1905, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. 

J. W. PAUSON, 

Secretary. 

San Francisco, Cal., October 17, 1905. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Pittsburg Oil Company 

Location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Location of works, Coalinga, 
Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Pittsburg Oil Company, held on the 23rd day of 
October, A. D, 1905, an assessment of four (4) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of this corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the company, at the office of the com- 
pany, rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Any stock upon which this 
assessment shall remain, unpaid on Saturday, De- 
cember 2, A. D. 1905, will be delinquent and adver- 
tised for sale at public auction, and, unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, 
December 28th, A. D., 1905, at 11 A. M., to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. J. LAYMANCE, Secretary 

Office — Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holra Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLD FIELD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can ass'st on purchase of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



STOC KS 

I handle Mines and Oil Lands and Act 
as Fiscal A£cnt for Good Securities 

D. L. HEALY 

BROKER 

Member of San Francisco & 
Tonopah Mining Exchange 

524 MILLS BUILDING 
Telephone Main 5747 San Francisco, Cal 



INVESTMENTS 



SAN JOSE CREMATION ASS'N. 

Now Incorporated. 

PRICES OF STOCK TODAY, PER SHARE $10. 

Prices December Next, $15; July, 1906, $20; 

December, 1906, $25, or Par. 

The Oakland Association has proven a great suc- 
cess, yielding in dividends last year 18 per cent to 
first investors. Prices advanced in three years 
from $10 to $27 per share. Equal or better results 
may be expected from the San Jose Cremation 
Association. 



Pays TYz per cent or $160 per share, two months' 
accrued interest. 

160 shares of Oakland Crematory Association at 
$27 per share. Has paid eight dividends since 
March, 1904, of 30c each. Dividends hereafter 
semi-annually, December and June. 



300 shares Columbian Oil Co., at 50c. Par value 
$1. Nineteen wells in operation. Dividends to be 
paid this fall. 



30,000 5 per cent bonds of the Turlock Irrigation 
District at par, denomination $400 each; issued 
1902, expire in 1942. 



- 125 shares of the Phoenix Savings Building and 
Loan Co. 



Water front property at $55 per foot. 



Business property under a lease paying 6 per 
cent on $50,000. Will sell for $36,000. 



FOR STOCK AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



W. E. BARNARD, 



746 Tenth St., 



Oakland, Cal. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

As a special inducement to new subscribers and to induce delinquent subscribers to "settle up" we 
will give as a premium to all new subscribers to the Pacific Oil Reporter, or to old subscribers who 
pay their subscription one year in advance, a copy of the Coalinga Map, printed on a fine quality bond 
paper, without extra charge. These maps sell for 50c. and are well worth the money. Subscribe 
for the Pacifie Oil Reporter and secure one free. 

SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

190.. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Gentlemen: 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil Reporter for months, commencing 

w ith tne issue. $ inclosed herewith in payment thereof. 

NAME 

Subscription Price : 
One Year, - - $2.50 ADDRESS 

Six Months, - - 1.S0 
Three "' - - - 1.00 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



13 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE. 



Following arc the stock sales on the California 
Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, Nov. 1 : 

Alma — 

100 shares at 

Claremont — 

500 shares at 

500 shares at 

Caribou — 

100 shares at 8.00 

Four — 

1000 shares at 

Independence — 

1000 shares at 

1000 shares at 

2500 shares at 

550 shares at , 

Kern — 

50 shares at 13.50 

Monte Cristo — 



.50 

.77';; 
.80 



.25 

.21 
.22 
.23 
.26 



1000 shares at 
900 shares at 
Monarch — 

900 shares at 



.75 
• 77/ 2 

.15 



Asked. 
.40 
.30 
.57 
8.12i/o 
.10 

.54 
.30 

.60 
.20 
14.50 
.25 
.20 



Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. 

Arline 35 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer... .56 

Caribou 7.00 

Chicago Crude New .... .08 

Claremont 77j^ 

Forty 52 

Four 25 

Hanford 190.00 

. Home 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 12.00 

Independence 21 

Junction 

Kern 13.00 

Kern (New) ■... .10 

Linda Vista 05 

Monarch of Arizona 15 

Monte Cristo .75 

Occidental of W. Va 

Oil City Petroleum 

Peerless 5.00 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 10 

Reed Crude 24 

Shawmut 

Sovereign 

Senator 1 - 65 

Superior 05 

Toltec 60 

Thirty-Three 4.87>< 

Twenty-Eight 

Wabash 30 

Wolverine 

West Shore 1-30 



.15 



.771/2 

.05 " 
.75 
7.25 
.07 
.11 



.36 
.30 



10.00 



1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

RTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 PineSt, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1552 



MAPS 

The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
tor Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants lor Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX m 




WANTED 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

I Fishing Tools 



W. E. YOULE 



SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUL l_ Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts ot Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 111S K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 

=^^^^= in any country === 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

(Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our pr. cess 

which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, Coalinga, California 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RELIABILITY OUR MOTTO 



BARLOW & HILL 



The up-to-date Map Makers 



BAKERSFIELD, 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



IS 



PriTite loomi 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



S1S-3I7-3I9-32I-323 

Pile St,. S F. 



Opei Erenings 
■isic Saniijs 



•••wllY ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



Coallnga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five ( 5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



'7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 




WHEELER & WILSON MT1 CO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Frarcleco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Be sure to be properly equipped for your bunting trip. 
Use the "STEVENS" and have the assurance that 
your choice cannot be improved upon, and that there 
Is no possibility of your game getting away when 
sighted by our guns. Our line: 

RIFLES, PISTOLS, SHOTGUNS 




The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for thr pro- 
motion ot any legitimate propo&i 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, P&tcits c: 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



H-U'H.'H 



Ask your dealer, and|DONT Fail to send for 

insist en our g^ods. If Illustrated catalog. Itis- 

youcann tobtainlhem 

we will ship direct, ex- 

prcs prepaid, upon 

receipt of price. 

HIT THE MARK with our RIFLE PUZZLE 1 This 

clever novelty will be mailed FREE upon request. 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 

P.O.B0X4093. Chicopkb Falls, Mass., u.s.a_ 



book of ready reference and 
appeals to all interested in 
tlie grand sport of shoot- 
ing. Mailed (■ r .( cents in 
stamps lo pay postage. 




for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
PAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



reL Mint 2791 g an Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisci 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry the uim Stock. Oar prlcei are 
Bq tillable. 

Tel. Mala. II8S. 



PATENT S — Unlted states and 

aaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaae Foreign. Trade 

Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 92 1 Park Building 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



mounted upon trucks separate. 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 

of machine for oil and gas works. It ,. . . „ ,, . ,. .„ . -.._ ... ..... 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made In Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Harron, Rickard & JHcCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



ASPHALTAGE' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



-MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZZZZZZ CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG.,17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describes 
California and the great West so 
well; none i-* morj beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers s.*II it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCALE EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 



ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 



Phone James 7116 



California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO 

Oil Chemists 

TK8TS 

CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM 

Calorific Value, Fractional 
Distillation. Refining, Vis- 
cosity, Freezing, Asphel- 
lii.e, Sand and Water, Btc. 

Kerosene, Asphaltum, Boiler 
Peed and Drinking Water. 

Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 





V This ParT noT 




Vol. 7, No. 2. 



San Francisco, Cal., November 11, 1905* Price lO Cents. 









J 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857 



LESCHEN'S 
DRILLING CABLES 
A % SAND LINES. 
A ^oCASING^bTUBING LINES. 



WIRE*! ROPE 




A.LESCHEN CS0N5 RO. 

920-9221 NORTH FIRST ST. 
930-932 J ST. LOCI IS, HO. '■ 



BRANCH OFFICES 
£ WAREHOUSES"- 



NEW YORK 

92 CENT Re ST. 

CHICAGO 

137 E, LAKE ST. 



DENVER 

17-17-23 ARAPAHOE ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

RtALTO B'ilo'G. 



OF EVERY 
[DESCRIPTION 



:■'.— p 



mm 
Mm 



WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LE8CHBN LINES... R. H. HER RON COMPANY 



AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean= 
ing out, pumping, pulb 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jtpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, November 11, 1905 



Number 2 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. . . 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

COALINGA. 

Price 
Gravity. per barrel. 

22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. . 22j^ 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

kern river. 
14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

Gravity at 60 deg. Price per bbl. 

Temperature. at Pt. Hartford. 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 22^c 

25 deg. up to, but not including 26 27j^c 

26 deg. up to, but not including 27 30c 

27 deg. or better 35c 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $1.71 

Pennsylvania 1-61 

Second Sand I Al 

Corning 1.13 

Newcastle 1-38 

Cabell 1-21 

North Lima 96 

South Lima "1 

Indiana °' 

Somerset ' 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light "1 

Corsicana, heavy *0 

Canada 1 . 3o 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30i ,,;, gravity 40 

30V> to 31 gravity 43 

31 to3iy 2 gravity • 4o 

31'. j to 32 gravity 49 

i2 gravity and over 5- 




III' milieu owners of British Colum- 
bia are commencing to squirm at 
the sharp competition inaugurated 
by the introduction of California 
fuel oil into that country for steam purposes. 
Having been driven, almost absolutely, from 
importing coal into this State, it can well he un- 
derstood they are loath to turn over the business 
in their own country to an aggressive and suc- 
cessful competition from here. Coal is sold quite 
cheaply in British Columbia, but the cost of min- 
ing runs close to $3.00 per ton, which, adding 
transportation charges and a reasonable profit, 
puts it at a price that enables the oil fuel to 
supercede its use in many instances from a mere 
point of economy. The additional advantages of 
higher efficiency, convenience in handling, etc., 
puts oil fuel far ahead of coal as a steam gener- 
ator. The Toronto (Canada) Globe of the date 
of October 7th, publishes a dispatch from Vic- 
toria, reading as follows : "The concluding ses- 
sion of the Tariff Commission to-day (Oct. 6) 
was marked by some interesting testimony. Thos. 
R. Stockett of the Western Fuel Co., Nanaimo, 
large operators in coal, asked for the re-enactment 
of the duty on crude oil, which was taken off a 
year or so ago. The reason he gave was that 
crude oil from California was being produced 
and sold so cheaply now, in fact sold at the well 
at ten to fifteen cents per barrel, that it was re- 
placing coal in California, formerly an important 
market for Vancouver Island coal, and was now 
being sold as well in British Columbia. 'It is,' 
Mr. Stockett said, 'a serious menace to the coal 
industry.' It was bad enough to have their Cali- 
fornia market cut off, but it was far worse to have 
the oil come here and cut off the market at our 
very doors. It was sold at 45 to 60 cents per bar- 
rel at San Francisco, and four barrels equalled 
a ton of coal for fuel purposes. Mr. Stockett 
said it was a low grade of oil, incapable of being 
refined. This led Mr. Paterson to suggest that 
possibly a tariff distinction might be made be- 
tween this oil and other crude oil which is refined, 
and Mr. Stockett promised to send a sample to 
the Customs Department for an analysis. Mr. 
Fielding pointed out the boon it was to all man- 
ufacturers to have cheap fuel and said there 
would not be much enthusiasm in the east for the 
re-enactment of the duty. He also figured that 
the old duty of two and one-half cents a gallon 
would be equivalent to about 170 per cent pro- 
tection on this class of oil." To re-enact a duty 



on crude petroleum into British Columbia would 
mean a great benefit to the colliery owners of that 
country but, on the other hand, would work ,-i 
great hardship on the manufacturers, who are 
considerably in the majority. California fuel oil 
has recently made great inroads on the fuel busi- 
ness of British Columbia and the manufacturing 
interests there have benefited greatly by the in- 
troduction of a better and cheaper fuel. It would 
be hardly fair that the growing manufacturing 
industry of Western Canada should be retarded 
that the colleries should flourish. California's 
remarkable growth during the past three years 
has been greatly due to cheap fuel and many in- 
dustries have been established here that would 
have been kept out by high priced fuel. Oregon 
and Washington have commenced to receive the 
benefits of California fuel oil, which is delivered 
at half the price formerly paid for coal. Ari- 
zona's mining and smelting industries are being 
profitably worked by the introduction of oil fuel. 
Canada can ill afford to exclude, by a prohibitive 
tariff, a commodity that is the key to the success- 
ful carrying on of any of its great manufacturing 
industries, i. e., cheap fuel, 



Production in the Texas-Louisiana districts fell 
below demands in October, and stocks were 
drawn upon to the extent of nearly 150,000 bar- 
rels. Humble's output was estimated at 868,000 
barrels, against 1,276,000 barrels in September, 
a decline of 408,000 barrels. Jennings improved, 
the October output of that field being estimated 
at 805,210 barrels, compared with 698,700 bar- 
rels in September. In the other districts there 
was an inconsiderable falling off except in the 
case of Dayton, which produced about 18,600 
barrels in October against 16,000 barrels in Sep- 
tember, and at Sour Lake, where an increase of 
about 4000 barrels was reported. 

The gross output in October is put at 2,475.- 
810 barrels, against 2,821,700 barrels in Septem- 
ber. The port movement of crude oil increased 
from 437,927 barrels in September to 526,450 
barrels in October, and the port movement of 
other grades decreased from 473,408 barrels in 
September to 293,440 barrels in October. Ran 
shipments from Trice, terminus of the 'I exas 
Company's pipe line from Humble to Houston, 
increased from 146.613 barrels in September to 
219,860 barrels in October, but the total move- 
ment from all Texas fields showed a decline, be- 
ing 785,146 barrels against 794,033 barrels in 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



September. The rail shipments from Jennings 
showed a healthy increase, amounting to 470,302 
barrels, against 376,245 barrels in September. 

Field operations showed little change, com- 
pared with September. The completion in Oc- 
tober numbered thirty, against thirty-three the 
preceding month. Wells drilling on October 31 
numbered forty-four, or one more than were 
drilling on September 30. Rigs up on October 
31 numbered eighteen, against fifteen on Sep- 
tember 30. 



The gross output of all the districts on Oc- 
tober 31 was estimated to be 78,040 barrels, 
against 83,720 barrels on September 30, a decline 
of 5680 barrels. Daily demands in September 
averaged 78,107 barrels, and in October 84,416 
barrels. 

Prices continued to rise in the absence of im- 
portant developments at Dayton and there were 
advances of four to eight cents a barrel in all 
districts. — Oil Investors' Journal. 



Production of Petroleum in 1904 

(Continued.) 

Texas. — The production of petroleum in that Southeastern Texas will very considerably 

Texas in 1904 was 22,241,413 barrels, valued at increase its production in 1905, and that immense 

$8,156,220, amounting to 36.7 cents per barrel, Quantities of fuel petroleum will be produced and 

r ( ioc o ii l i j • i marketed, 

an increase of 4,285,841 barrels, and in value 

$638,741 over that of 1903, amounting to. 23.87 The drilli "g ° f " elIs has in several instances 

per cent of the entire production of the United revealed the existence of the ""deriving deposits 

States and places Texas next to California and of P^roleum and natural gas under great pres- 

j • i r .i j ■ c„,.„. tv,- sure, which have in numerous instances responded 

second in rank of the producing states. 1 he a " ' 

in a most remarkable manner. There are, there- 
fore, many possibilities that the drill will continue 
to develop these buried deposits that are not in- 
dicated by any structural condition of the surface. 
In some instances the wells drilled have developed 
an anticlinal structure on whose flank large flows 
of salt water have been encountered. 

All of the fields so far developed in South- 
eastern Texas have suffered more or less from 
the presence of salt water, which, as the internal 
pressure decreases, follows up the flanks of the 



value of the production in Texas was $8,156,220 
in 1904, which represents 8.06 per cent of the 
entire production and places this State fifth in 
the rank of States. 

The shifting nature of the pools in Southeast- 
ern Texas illustrated by the fact that the Beau- 
mont and the Sour Lake and Saratoga pools in 
1903 produced 17,449,064 barrels, which was 
almost evenly divided between them, and the 
Batson pool, which was just beginning to pro- 
duce at the close of 1903, produced only 4518 



u i i ion i .i ..' j • .u deposit and shuts off the flow of petroleum. In 

barrels. In 19U4 the entire production of the v H 

n„„ „ t j .i c ti i j^ic numerous instances air pressure has for a time 

rseaumont and the sour Lake pools and the Sara- y 



toga pools was 10,615,438 barrels, and the new 



counteracted its bad effect, but the relief was 



Batson pool alone produced 10,904,737 barrels only tem P° rar 5'- 
in 1904; this pool only produced 4518 barrels in Spindletop Pool.— The original well that 

1903. The Matagorda pool -"produced 151,936 opened up this pool, located four miles south of 

barrels, making a grand total of 21,672,111 bar- Beaumont, was drilled January 10, 1901, which 

rels in Southeastern Texas in 1904, which was began t0 flow at the rate of 70i000 barrels per 
secured from about 650 producing wells. 



The largest decrease in production was in the 
original Beaumont pool, which for 1904 was 
3,433,842 barrels, as compared with 8,600,905 
barrels in 1903. The new Humble field, 16 
miles north of Houston, in Harris county, was 
not opened up until in 1905. The great 
coastal plain of Southeastern Texas has pro- 
duced a number of prolific fields where the sand 
has been found saturated with petroleum and 
natural gas pressure. In most of the instances 
there was nothing on the surface to indicate 



day, which was without a precedent in this coun- 
try, and since beginning up to the close of 1904 
this pool, consisting of 200 acres, has produced 
and sold 33,050,000 barrels, to which must be 
added 1,500,000 that were wasted and consumed 
by fire, making a grand total of 34,500,000 bar- 
rels, sufficient to cover the entire area to a depth 
of 22 feet. Over 1200 wells have been drilled on 
this limited area at a depth of from 1000 to 1060 
feet, which does not include the number of dry 
holes that have surrounded the productive area. 



the existence of these deposits. The monot- At the close of 1904 . not over 95 weIls were pr °: 
onous gentle slope was toward the Gulf, with 



during less than 6000 barreds per day, ncne of 
which were flowing. The remaining 1100 were 
lost, owing to these principal causes, namely, 



a profusion of slight mounds, the regularity of 

which is at intervals interrupted by streams flow- through faulty drilling and casing, others ceased 

ing toward the Gulf. It is reasonable to infer soon after completion to be productive, and fin- 



ally many others had to be abandoned owing to 
the inflow of salt water in large quantities. 

Sour Lake Pool. — This pool lies 20 miles 
northwest of Beaumont. Three or four shallow 
wells had developed a heavy, dark petroleum 
four or five years before the development at 
Spindletop. 

The earliest work in this field was done in 
1893. During the summer of 1901 the Guffey 
Petroleum Company drilled in a well in this lo- 
cality which gave spasmodic flows of petroleum, 
accompanied by gas and water. Since then there 
has been secured from this pool up to the close of 
1904 over 14,800,000 barrels of petroleum. The 
gravity ranges from 14 degrees to 22 degrees 
Baume. At the close of 1904 there were 105 
wells, producing 11,500 barrels per day. 

Saratoga District. — This pool is located 10 
miles northeast of Sour Lake and has been a 
comparatively small producer. Its production in 

1903 was estimated to be 160,000 barrels, that of 

1904 was 739,239 barrels, making a total of 900,- 
000 barrels. The petroleum produced in this pool 
is heavy, ranging from 14 degrees to 20 degrees 
Baum. The developments were much more ac- 
tive in 1904 than formerly. At the close of 1904 
there were 38 wells, producing 20,000 barrels per 
day, with considerable area undeveloped. 

Batson Prairie District. — This pool is lo~ 
cated_8 miles west of Saratoga and was remark- 
able for its sudden development and rapid de- 
cline. Owing to the erratic behavior of the wells 
it was one of the features of the development in 
Southeastern Texas during 1904. During 1903 
there were but 4518 barrels produced in this pool, 
a; it was just discovered, but in 1904 it produced 
10,094,737 barrels of petroleum, falling off re- 
markably at the close of the year. Two hundred 
and sixty wells were producing 11,700 barrels per 
day. The falling off was due principally to the 
flooding of a large portion of the productive area 
by salt water. The gravity of the petroleum 
produced in this pool is lighter and superior to 
the general average produced in Southeastern 
Texas. It ranges from 23 degrees to 241/; de- 
grees Baume, although some petroleum as light 
as 28 degrees Baume was produced. 

Matagorda Pool. — This pool was opened up 
during 1904 and is the furthest development in 
a southwest direction, as it is 80 miles from 
Houston, on an elevation known as Big Hill, 3 
miles from the town of Matagorda. During 
1904 it produced 151,936 barrels of petroleum 
of a dark green color and of 19 degrees to 20 
degrees Baume gravity. At the close of 1904 
there were about 30 wells producing, a number 
of wells having been abandoned on account of 
salt water. Many of the wells were erratic in 



their behavior and ai times produced large quan- 
of petroleum mixed with salt water, 
tually they produced nothing but salt water. 
The production i> carried by pipe line to the Cane 
Belt Railroad b> the Big Hill Oil and Fuel Com- 
pany and the Matagorda Oil and Pipe Line Com- 
pany, and shipped in tank cars and marketed for 
fuel. 

Ik \tni i District. — The new Humble pool 
in Harris county is 16 miles north oi Houston, 
and was opened up during 1904. There were 
two productive wells at the close of 1904 that 
were not producing regularly, About 2000 bar- 
rels of petroleum were produced which was stored 
in earthen tanks for fuel. None was sold. The 
Beatty well was the first to be completed and 
commenced to produce in January, and a num- 
ber were drilling at the close of the year in this 
pool. None of the production was marketed until 
January, 1905, when it commenced to assume 
importance, and in April was reported to have 
produced nearly 2,000.000 barrels. 

Corsicana District. — This was the first reg- 
ular district opened up in Texas. Since 1897 it 
has produced more than 500,000 barrels per year, 
and for the past two years its production was 
very close to that amount. 

There are two grades of petroleum produced 
in this field — the lighter and superior grade be- 
ing classed as Corsicana and the latter as Powell 
petroleum. In 1904 there were 374,318 barrels 
of Corsicana and 129,329 barrels of Powell pe- 
troleum produced. For several years there has 
been a decline in the production of the Corsicana 
petroleum while both 1903 and 1904 have shown 
an increase in the production of the Powell pe- 
troleum. The average price paid in 1904 for 
the Corsicana petroleum was 87 cents per barrel 
and 43 cents for that classed under the head of 
Powell. The gravity of the Corsicana petroleum 
is about 40 degrees Baume ; that of the Powell 
district is considerably heavier and produces a 
less percentage of lighter and desirable products. 
There were 74 wells completed in these fields 
in 1904, of which 46 were producers, 26 were 
dry, 2 produced gas, and 31 were abandoned. 

South Basque District. — At South Basque, 
McLellan county, 70 miles southwest of Cor- 
s'cana, 2 wells have been completed at between 
450 and 475 feet in depth, which will produce 
from 3 ', -j to 5 barrels per day of light petroleum, 
with a gravity ranging from 42 degrees to 25 
degrees Baume. Three other wells found no 
producing- horizon, which in this field resembles 
rotten blue shale. Developments are still in prog- 
ress, but no petroleum was shipped from the field 
in 1904, all the production being used in the field 
for fuel. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Hbnrirtta District. — This field is l 
in Claj county near the Red River, on the north- 
ern border oi Texas, and 150 miles northwest 
oi O rsicana. There were scvccral wells drilled 
in this localit] previous to 1904, but the produc- 
tion and shipment date, from that year. In [904 
there weie 65,455 barrels produced, valued at 
47V4 cents per barrel. There were SO producing 
wells completed, most of which produced only 
from 3 to 40 barrels per day, found at a depth of 
'" '" 500 to 320 feet, where a gray sand is found. 
The quality resembles that found at Corsicana, 
showing 33 degrees Baume, and has a paraffin 
base. Most of the production is shipped to the 
refinery at Corsicana. 

The field is connected by two pipe lines lead- 
ing to the racks at Petrolia Station, distant 1 y 2 
miles. An analysis made in a laboratory still gave 
naphtha, 9.1 per cent; water white, 54.5 per cent; 
solar oil, 13.6 per cent; heavy distillate, asphalt 
water and loss, 22.8 per cent. 

Bexar County District. — Only a small 
quantity of heavy petroleum was produced in this 
pool in 1902. It came from wells 600 to 800 
feet in depth, near San Antonio, and supplied a 
small local demand. 

Nacogdoches County. — Numerous shallow 
wells were drilled prior to 1895 near Oil Springs 
in Nacogdoches county, some 12 miles southeast 
of the town of Nacogdoches. There has been a 
considerable outlay in drilling wells, establishing 
receiving tanks and building a pipe line, all of 
which has been practically abandoned. Only a 
very limited quantity, supply a local demand, is 
now marketed. 

Brazoria County. — At Kiser Hill, near Co- 
lumbia, Brazoria county, petroleum of good lub- 
ricating qualities has been developed, which, ow- 
ing to want of transportation, was not operated 
during 1904. 

Pipe Lines in Operation in Texas. — At 
the close of 1904 there were 5131/3 miles of trunk 
pipe lines from 4 to 8 inches in diameter operated 
by the following-named companies: 

Miles. 

J. M. Guffey Petroleum Company 135 

The Texas Company : 126 

Security Oil Company 126 

The Sun Company 38V-; 

National Oil and Pipe Line Company. ... 18 

Higgins Oil Company 22 

United Oil and Refining Company 30 

Ray wood Rice Company 18 

Total 513^ 

Besides these, there are a number of companies 
who have short pipe lines to leading racks at the 
railroads, operating under the following titles: 
Heywood Oil Company, Higgins Paraffine Pipe 
Line Company. Rio Bravo Oil Company, J. M. 
Abbott Oil Company, Sour Lake Storage and 



Pipe Line Company, and Lone Star and Crescent 
Company, making fourteen companies who 

handle crude petroleum and who have reported. 

The shipment by water of crude and refined 
petroleum increased from 8,000,339 barrels in 
1903 to 10,054,036 bands in 1904, about 74 per 
cenl ol which went to New York and Philadel- 
phia and 91 L , p ,. r ccn t went to foreign countries, 
which in 1904 amounted to 40,266,180 gallons, 
valued at $2,026,756, and included crude, lubri- 
cating, illuminating petroleum and residuum, as 
compared witlh 20,900,309 gallons, valued at 
$520,628, in 1903. There were 1,286,593 bar- 
rels of crude and refined petroleum shipped to 
Louisiana, most of which went to Gretna, oppo- 
site New Orleans, and from this point distributed 
by vessels, boats on the Mississippi, and by rail. 

Illuminating petroleum and gasoline manufac- 
tured at Beaumont, Port Arthur and Sabine Pass 
are finding a market in the South and West, al- 
though their gravity and fire test are somewhat 
higher than that manufactured from Pennsylvania 
petroleum, but then their efficiency is generally 
satisfactory to the consumers. From the lighter 
crude produced at Sour Lake and Batson about 
3.5 per cent of the gasoline 66 degree test is se- 
cured, 14.5 per cent of illuminating petroleum or 
kerosene 120 degree test, and 55 per cent of gas 
oil, the reamining 27 per cent being residuum and 
loss. (To be continued.) 



COAL ARRIVALS. 



J. W. Harrison, coal and metal broker of this 
city, reports that since the Australian steamship 
"Sonoma" left this port there has been but one 
coal arrival from Australia, viz: "Clan Graham," 
2,330 tons. There are three sailing vessels and 
one steamer, all coal carriers, which are fully 
due to arrive here this month. There are on the 
coal, twenty-three vessels, with a carrying capa- 
chartered list from Newcastle, N. S. W, to load 
city of about 48,000 tons. The "Clan Graham" 
has been the only vessel to deliver Colonial coal 
here in October. The same month last year 
there were nine vessels, which delivered 23,710 
tons. • This shows a very pronounced shrinkage 
this year. The arrival of coal from all sources 
for the month of October this year is 28,652 tons 
less than October, 1904. There are but very- 
small stocks of Australian grades now here in 
yard ; still there appears to be no change in the 
asking prices for the little that is here, although 
the Fall demand is now beginning, and, to make 
good the deficit, three steamers have been char- 
tered to bring Newcastle coal, which should ar- 
rive here during the month. New steamer en- 
gagements have recently been made for the trans- 
portation of British Columbia fuel to this port. 
These, with shipments from other Coast ports, 
will supply nearly all immediate requirements for 
our Winter trade. Harmony again prevails 
among the Nanaimo coal miners, and the output 
promises to be materially augmented. Freight 
rates from the Colonies are quoted at an ad- 
vance, making Australian products cost some- 
what higher. The output of fuel oil is not de- 
creasing, and there is no perceptible change in 
value;, although producers are demanding higher 
prices. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Mews from the Field 



COALINGA. 



Coalinca, Cal„ Nov. 8. — Wabash Oil Co. 
is very nearly 1100 feet deep with 8-inch casing 
on its well No. 6, and contemplates shutting the 
water off very shortly. The gumbo oil was struck 
at about 950 feet. 

W. K. well No. 1 is drilling with 4y 3 -inch 
casing. They are about 2300 feet deep. 

Mr. W. L. Stewart of the Union Oil Co. 
spent a few days in the field during the past 
week. 

The Kern Trading and Oil Co., which is the 
oil fields department of the Southern Pacific 
Co., is hauling material to the old Cory & Can- 
field lease on section 25 with which to erect rigs 
over the two wells on said property to replace 
those which, at the abandonment of the property 



short time ago. They have been deepening well 
No. 5. 

Montana Oil Co. on section 24 is shut down. 

Mr. S. R. Bowen, manager of R. H. Herron 
Co.'s store, made a trip to Fresno during the 
past week. 

As for new drilling operations, they are at a 
minimum, less new wells being started than at 
any time in the history of the field for several 
years past, and the indications are that this con- 
dition will continue. In fact, that it will grow 
steadily worse until prices for oil improve. Al- 
most without exception, the operators, who are 
now drilling, state that as soon as the wells on 
which they are at work are completed, they will 
cease drilling, and it is safe to say that within 
the next two or three months there will not be 



Company, known as the "Great Gusher," which 
blew itself out, has been cleaned out and will 
soon be in commission. Arrangements have been 
made to control the gas and oil that seem about 
perfect. No. 2 and No. 3 wells are producing 
about 300 barrels per day; Nos. 5, 6, 7, 10 and 
11 are producing. The company has landed the 
10-inch pipe in No. 4, 1119 feet and shut off 
the water; its No. 12 has over 1400 feet of 10- 
inch pipe in the hole, and a landing is expected 
soon. The company is fortunate in having an 
experienced and successful oil man to operate its 
holdings, the services of Mr. A. B. Canfield, a 
competent operator, having been secured. The 
pipe line to Oro Station, on the S. P. R. R., 
owned by this company, is a valuable factor in 
prompt delivery of oil on its contracts. 

We have been informed that the California 
and New York and the California-Monarch Oil 
Co.'s have made a contract with one of the big 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MINERAL OIL FROM THE PACIFIC PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE SHIPMENTS TO ALASKA 
AND HAWAII DURING SEPTEMBER, 1905. 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS. 

Domestic Exports from — 

Alaska 

Oregon, Ore 

Puget Sound 

San Diego 

San Francisco 



Mineral, Crude. Naphthas, Etc. Illuminating. 

Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. 

224 81 5,700 1,305 

14,000 

621 107 534 83 

3 912 177 

26,175 3,877 1,549,953 74,141 



Lubricating. Residuum. 

Gallons. Dollars. Barrels. Dollars. 

539 212 



420,000 
"50 



*8,422 18,785 2,326 

40 13 

19,555 6,046 



163 



Total Domestic 420,050 

SHIPMENTS TO ALASKA. 

From Puget Sound 9,434 

From San Francisco 

SHIPMENTS TO HAWAII. 

From Los Angeles 680,250 

From San Francisco 2,646,000 



14,003 27,020 4,065 1,557,099 75,706 28,556 25,056 2,326 



163 



886 26,455 3,637 27,363' 5,166 
. ... 60,000 9,000 54,626 9,445 



5,632 2,344 
11,300 3,995 



23,900 

88,200 32,024 3,832 28,877 4,810 11,567 3,031 

*Very high. This office has written to Puget Sound to verify these figures. 



Reported expressly for Pacific Oil Reporter by Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Statistics, November 2, 1905. 

M. Jacobson, 

Acting Chief of Bureau. 



by the lessees, were removed. It has always been 
a mystery why this property was abandoned by 
the lessees, as the wells drilled there were un- 
doubtedly better than the average wells in the 
west side of the field. When the lease was given 
up, the inside casing was removed, and, not- 
withstanding this fact, the wells continued there- 
after and until the present time to flow a con- 
siderable quantity of oil, enough it is believed, to 
make a good paying proposition. 

The Lucile Oil Co., which has been shut 
down for the past week or so to determine defin- 
itely whether or not the water is shut off, will 
resume operations on Monday next, and is con- 
fident it will get the pay sand within the next 
100 feet or thereabouts. 

Stockholders Oil Co. is about 900 feet deep 
with its well No. 4. 

Caribou Oil Mining Co. has rebuilt the rig 
of well No. 8, which was destroyed by fire a 



over half a dozen strings of tools running, un- 
less something unforseen occurs. 

Mr. John R. Johnson and Mr. Shirley C. 
Ward of Los Angeles, stockholders in the Mc- 
Creary and Pittsburg-Coalinga Oil Cos., spent 
a few days in the field last week. A. E. S. 

The California and New York Oil Com- 
pany's property commands the attention of all 
who delight in a well managed property, fully 
equipped and producing. Its well No. 1 con- 
tinues to flow uninterruptedly; has a record of 
2000 barrels for a day's run, and is to-day the 
best producer on the West side. No. 2 well is 
being "brought in," showing considerable gas and 
oil, and doing about 200 barrels daily, which it 
js expected to double as soon as the sand is work- 
ed out. The company has started to perfect its 
water system, which will lessen the operating ex- 
penses. 

Well No. 1 of the California Monarch Oil 



marketing agencies for several millions of bar- 
rels of oil to be delivered within a given period. 
Such a contract will place the above companies 
in an excellent financial position for several years. 
As many of the companies' wells are flowing 
ones the cost of production is placed at a mini- 
mum and a nice profit will be netted. While 
the price named on the contract cannot be as- 
certained it is understood that it does not fall 
much below 20 cents per barrel. 



Errata. — In our Santa Maria letter, pub- 
lished in the November 4th issue of this journal, 
we wish to correct the names of the officers of 
the Union Oil Company of California to read as 
follows: Lyman Stewart, president; John 
Baker, vice-president and manager of the sales, 
marine and manufacturing department ; W. 
L. Stewart , manager executive department; J. 
S. Torrence, manager financial department. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



SANTA MARIA. 



i \ \l \ki \. Cai ., Nov. s. 1905. 

The Santa Maria oil field continues along its 
usual stead) pace in pipe line building, new tier- 
II shipments and the like. 

The Brookshire Oil Co. is down in it^ last 
well 2 and in oil. But until the well 

flmi^ the drillers will keep going down. This 
COmpan) lias hut ten wells as yet, hut the] ail- 
line producers. It supplies a great deal of the 
local trade and has a pipe line to Betteravia tor 
the sugar factor] and for the spur of the S. I'. 
for shipments abroad, and also a pipe to the nar- 
row gauge railway. 

The Pinal Co. is about spudding in for another 
well on its property. They have issued another 
dividend anil are delivering considerable oil on 
their contracts. 

The Western Union is delivering oil and last 
month paid a good dividend, the first of a series 
of them, as they also have large contracts for oil 
ill liveries. 

The Union Oil Co. has, since our last report, 
started two more derricks, one on the Folsom 
lease and the other on its newly acquired terri- 
tory, the Santa 'Maria Oil and Gas Company's 
property; For the town of Orcutt they are pip- 
ing gas down from their wells to the stores and 
dwellings of the hustling little town. This is 
quite a boon for good and cheap light for the 
people, and in the long run it will remunerate 
the company. We hear that another warehouse 
is in contemplation for their increased business, 
but of this later, when it goes up. Buildings are 
still in demand in Orcutt. 

The Kaiser well has been deepened and is a 
good producer. The pipe of the Standard is right 
on the ground as well as at Hall & Hall's No. 1, 
which is of about the same capacity. 

The Standard Oil Co. is to build four more of 
their 35,000-gallon tanks on their location, half 
a mile west of Orcutt and seven miles south of 
Santa Maria. They have here 30 acres of 
ground with a number of these large tanks, and 
quite a settlement of houses for their men, look- 
ing to the permanency of this field for their sup- 
ply of medium and light gravity oils. 

One of the recent oil companies is the Syndi- 
cate, in a new field in the more westerly part of 
the county, between Casmalia and the Guada- 
lupe hills. The lease is on the J. B. Bonetti and 
Taminelli tracts. Prominent men of some of 
the other companies are the incorporators of this 
company. They are five miles away from the 
proven territory and will he pioneers in this field 
if they prove it to be oil territory. L. F. B. 



BE YOUR OWN PR01W0T0R 



W*e have just secured the control and sale 
■ it fourteen mining claims, adjoining in one 
group, at Bullfrog, Nevada. The claims 
lie close to and smith and east of the Orig- 
inal Bullfrog and the Bullfrog Extension, 

two ot the big mines that have installed 
hoisting machinerj and are vigorously open- 
ing up enormous ledges of phenomenally 
high grade ore; and these fourteen claims 
lie next to and east of the Big Bullfrog, 
which has already opened up a big ledge of 
oie, and has installed a very complete plant 
of hoisting machinery. 

The claims we offer are well located, as 
will be shown by the map that we will 
send on your request. In each of the four- 
teen claims of this group we are going to 
sell a three-fourths interest, retaining one- 
fourth interest ourselves. For each one- 



fourth interest sold a good and sufficient 

deed will he made to the purchaser. When 
these several interests an- sold a company 
will he incorporated, and each buyer of a 
one-fourth interest in each claim will share 
equallj in the promotion stock of the com- 
pany in proportion to the interest he holds. 
'I on can buy a one-fourth interest in half a 
dozen different claims if you prefer; or a 
three-fourths interest in any one claim, but 
we do not want to sell any one of the claims 
outright, preferring to keep them in one 
body. 

Here's a chance to get a great big block 
of stock in a company to be incorporated, 
for a small amount of money. The com- 
pany will be started free of debt and own- 
ing its property. Maps and further facts 
sent on request to prospective purchasers. 



DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

RIALTO BUILDING, A-IO 
SAN FRANCISCO, *P ^» CALIFORNIA 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



Oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange have declared dividends as 
follows : 

Thirty-Three 10 

Imperial $ .20 

The Empire is sinking continuously and is 
now about 30 feet below the 500-foot level, at 
which level drifting is being prosecuted both east 
and west in good ore. Drifting continues on the 
200 west and will shortly start an upraise. This 
is in good ore and all virgin ground from this 
level to the surface. The roasting of sulphurets 
in the chlorination works continues steadily and 
with good results. 

The Murchie mine never looked better in its 
history and the pay shoot on the 700 level has 
never seen its equal in the history of Nevada 
county. In the winze, which is now down 75 
feet below the 700-foot level, there is a solid 
body 1 1 feet 8 inches, between walls of heavy 
mineralized ore with a good gouge on each wall. 
The 400 west drift is now in 340 feet. Drift- 
ing on the vein b to 8 feet wide showing much 
free gold. The mill is crushing an average of 
over 50 tins a day with excellent results. The 
Murchie gold mines the first of the month ship- 



ped about 35 tons of very high grade sulphurets. 

The Wellington Post contains the following 
relative to the operations of oil prospectors on the 
North Island of New Zealand : 

Mr. George Fair, who is in charge of the pe- 
ti oleum-boring works at New Plymouth is at 
present on a visit to Wellington. In the course 
of a conversation with a Post representative, Mr. 
Fair expressed himself very optimistic regarding 
the ultimate success of the operations now being 
carried out in the Taranaki district. One of the 
chief difficulties experienced in similar undertak- 
ings in the past has been the inflow of water. 
This obstacle has now, it is claimed, been over- 
come, and Mr. Fair is confident that apaying well 
has been struck. The well has been sunk to a 
depth of 2,054 feet, and the bore is, Mr. Fair 
states, still in oil stratum. The syndicate is wait- 
ing the arrival from Australia of the necessary 
pumping apparatus. Mr. Fair, who has had con- 
siderable experience in similar work in Roumania, 
Galicia and Canada, speaks in positive terms of 
the quality of the oil obtained in Taranaki, and he 
anticipates that an official analysis, which it ;s 
intended to make, will yield the following re 
Benzine. 15 per cent; illuminating, 42; lubrica- 
tion. 26; and aparffin, 15. The syndicate h 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



cured rights . over 6,242 acres, and Taranaki as 
a petroleum center is to be thoroughly explored. 
"In eighteen months' time," added Mr. Fair, "if 
my anticipations are realized— and I am sanguine 
they will be — we shall have fully 2,000 men em- 
ployed in the industry, and a new era will be 
started in the progressive history of Taranaki." 

Tests on the comparative values of crude oil, 
fuel oil and slack coal, for evaporating purposes 
were made, according to Ice and Refrigeration, 
in the latter part of May and during June at the 
plant of Jacob Dold Packing Co., Wichita, Kan. 
The fuels used in making the tests included crude 
oil from the wells at Wayside, Kan., fuel oil from 
the Neodesha, Kan., wells are supplied by the 
Patty Oil Co., and coal known as east Kansas 
slaek. The boilers used in the test were all of 
the return tubular type, 66 inches in diameter and 
18 feet long, each boiler containing 54 tubes 4 
inches in diameter and being rated at 145 horse- 
power per hour. The boilers used for the test 
with crude oil and fuel oil were equipped with J. 
Tate & Co.'s burners, while those used in the 
coal tests were fitted with flat grates. The com- 
putations in tabulating the results were based on 
a total heat of saturated steam at 1188.2 degrees 
according to Haswell. All the water used in the 
several tests passed through a meter, so that the 
amount of water evaporated by the fuel in ques- 
tion could be accurately determined. The tests 
were made as far as possible under normal condi- 
tions. 

In' these tests one pound of crude oil sufficed to 
evaporate on an average 11.23 pounds of water. 
One pound of fuel oil, starting with a cold boiler 
and running 121 hours, evaporated an average of 
13.72 pounds of water, while the same fuel in a 
boiler starting at 120 pounds steam and run for 
26 1 /> hours evaporated an average of 14.3 pounds 
of water. With slack coal, boiler starting at 120 
pounds steam, the evaporation per pound of coal 
is 7.366, and with the boiler starting at 85 pounds 
steam the average is but 6.88. In a test made in 
Topeka at the plant of the Topeka Cold Storage 
Co. in June with Weir City slack coal, the aver- 
age evaporation per pound of coal in 6 hours was 
given as but 6.23 pound-, so that even if the oil 
cost twice as much per pound as the coal, it would 
still be more economical and that without con- 
sidering any other points in favor of the oil fuel. 
The mid-continent oil field is now producing 
more oil than the Indiana-Ohio fields, and with 
14,251 barrels, as much as the famous Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, Kentucky, southern New 
York and southeastern Ohio fields. During the 
first half of the present month the runs of oil in 
the mid-continent field averaged 49,690 barrels. 
During the same period the runs in Indiana- 
Ohio averaged 41,716 barrels, and in the fields 



producing Pennsylvania oil, 63,941 barrels. The or elsewhere. It gives a cold and fire test that 

shipment or consumption of Pennsylvania oil is unequaled by any other. 

averaged 72,196 barrels, and Indiana-Ohio 62,- The lubricating petroleum is found in the first 

934, which means a drain upon Pennsylvania Venango oil sand, near Franklin, Pa., which has 

stock of 8,255 barrels a day upon Indiana-Ohio a th i c kness of 50 feet at a depth of from 275 to 

stocks of 21,218 barrels, or a total of 29,475 bar- 350 feetj and ; s associated with [arge quantities of 

rels. The shipments or consumption of mid-con- sa]t water _ The wells are small proc [ ucers and 

tinent, or Kansas oil, averaged 10,166 barrels, a large quantity of salt water is pumped with the 

leaving a surplus stock for tankage of 39,523 bar- petroleum. The whole area of productive ter- 

rels, meaning that in three great fields the pro- ritory covers about sixteen sqlare miles The 



duction for the period named exceeded the con- 
sumption by 10,050 barrels. 



Report on Lubricating Oil 



wells are operated and pumped in clusters of from 
50 to 100 each by a single power, and many of 
them produce only a few gallons daily. The 
gravity of the natural lubricating petroleum 
found in the old field is 32 deg. Baume; in the 
area outside of the older territory, but bordering' 
on it, the gravity is 34 deg. Baume. Its fluidity 
is not seriously affected by a temperature of zero. 



A new chapter has been added to the annual 
report of the U. S. Geological Survey upon the 
production of petroleum in 1904. This chapter 

deals with the production and characteristics of The production for 1904 of the Franklin dis- 

lubricating petroleum and with calorific value of ■ trict was 48,499 barrels, to which must be added 

the principal grades of fuel oil. Following is an making a total of 74,724 barrels, 

advance abstract of this interesting feature of the 26,255 barrels produced at Petroleum, W. Va., 

report: There is superior natural lubricating petroleum 

Lubricating petroleum of the finest grade is found in Wyomini, and the quantity produced in 

found in native condition generally in the higher 1904 was 11,543 barrels, valued at $7 per barrel, 

strata of the productive series at shallow depths; There were also 1583 barrels produced in the 



it is often associated with more or less salt water, 
and usually ranges from 30 deg. to 34 deg. 
Baume. It is not affected so far as its fluidity is 
concerned at a temperature of zero or below, and 
it commands the highest price of any variety of 
natural petroleum. 

There is also a large quantity of lubricating 



Mecca-Beldin field in Ohio, valued at $3.72 
per barrel. The Franklin lubricating oil brought 
$4 per barrel at the wells, and the West Vir- 
ginia $3.11 a barrel. 

Lubricating as applied in mechanical opera- 
tions, is the means used to overcome friction. 
Friction is produced by the motion of one body 



oil manufactured from Pennsylvania crude pe- sliding over another. The product of friction is 

troleum, some of which is mixed with the natural heat. The heat thus produced causes damage and 

product. No other lubricating petroleum is equal serious loss in mechanical effect, and it is the ob- 

to that produced in the Appalachian field. Its j^t of lubrication either to prevent this heat or 



reputation is worldwide; nearly all of the rail- 



to neutralize it and thus reduce the expenditure 



of force. Lubricants formerly used were ot vege- 
roads in the United states (covering about 9/ ,, ..... „, , , • . ,, 

table and animal origin. 1 hese lubricants quickly 

per cent of the mileage) and many of the steam- change chemically on exposure to moderate 

ship lines use it exclusively. It is largely market- changes of temperature, forming acids which are 

ed abroad, being used on railroad and steamship injurious to metals. They are now used only 

lines. There were 2,135,000 barrels, valued at with great care and in mixture with petroleum or 



mineral lubricants. It is the petroleum or min- 
eral lubricant which satisfies all requirements that 
are demanded by the trade. 

Theoretically, the best lubricant is the one 
whose adhesiveness is infinite and whose cohesiv- 
eness is nil; practically this rule must be adjusted 
in each case. Adhesiveness is the clinging of the 
particles of one body to each other. Vicosity is 
the state of fluidity of a body — its cohesiveness. 
High pressure (weight) and slow motion require 
a lubricant of great vicosity and good ad- 
hesiveness. Both liquid and solid lubricants are 
^^^^ used — liquid lubricants are oils, and solid lubri- 
Three hundred and twenty acres of oil land, cants are greases. As a rule, the former have a 

, ■ • ., t- T>. -i i_ i*. c i/ c a.- n higher lubricating value, and the latter are more 

lying in the Kern River oil belt — S. % Section "•..,. 

economical for lcose gears, slow-running cogs, 
T. 31, R. 29 E. M. D. B. & M.— for sale at heavy mac hjnery, rolling mills, etc. 

a bargain. See us at once or write The principal physical tests applied to compare 



$12,393,382, exported to foreign countries in 
1904. The particular requirements have put to 
be known and our manufacturers can invariably 
produce a lubricant that will give the results de- 
sired. 

The large yield of natural crude lubricating 
petroleum comes from Franklin, Pa., and Pe- 
troleum, W. Va., which localities have long been 
celebrated for the production of the finest natural 
lubricating petroleum found in trie United States 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



determine the value of lubricants 
|. M show the degn 

fluidity, also the internal friction and : 

to metallic surfaces oi I lubricant at a 
certain temperature. 

Flash and lirr test, to determine the de- 

of heat — the temperature — at which lubri- 

raise vapors that will ignite when miNi-.I 

with air and exposed to an open flame or live 

spark and will continue to burn. 

Specific gravity, the determination of dif- 
ference in weight of equal volumes of lubri- 
cant and distilled water at a certain tempera- 
ture. 

4. The cold test, the degree of low tempera- 
ture at which a lubricant remains liquid. 

5. The evaporation test, to obtain the per- 
ge of volatile matter of a lubricant at a 

certain temperature, usually the working tem- 
perature at which such lubricants are practi- 
cally applied. 

b. Mechanically admixed impurities in a lu- 
bricant will show when s;ime of it is poured on 
a piece of white paper. After a few minutes 
the oil or grease spot will show a dirty ring 
around it. or the surface of the oil or grease 
spot will be spotted or rough. 

The petroleum lubricants differ according to 
the crude petroleum frim which they are made. 
The chemical composition of crude petroleum 
from different localities is not the same, which 
shows that the materials u:.ed in its prepara- 
tion in the earth vary, or that by filtration 
through different strata different combinations 
are formed. 

Calorific Value of Petroleum. — The calorific 
or heat-producing property of petroleum when 
combined with proper proportions of air is 
measured by the number of pounds of water 
from and at 212 deg. f. evaporated by 1 pound of 
petroleum fuel. It has also been determined 
that the heat energy necessary to evaporate 1 
pound of water would raise 966 pounds of water 
at or near 39.1 deg. F. 1 degree, which is usually 
written B. T. U., for British Thermal Unit. 
The French thermal standard is the "Calorie," 
and is the quantity of heat necessary to raise 
one kilogram (2.2046 pounds) of water 1 deg. 
cendigrade (1.8 deg. F.). The "B. T. U." is, 
therefore, only equal to 0.252 calorie. 

The following table shows the comparative 
value of fuel petroleum from the principal fields 
of the United States and from Russia : 

Actual lbs, 
of water 
evapi irated 
Specific in boilers 

Locality. gravity. at 212 F, 

Pennsylvania crude 8253 14.85 

Pennsylvania crude, heavy .8860 16.00 

Ohio, Lima 8383 16.45 

Texas, Beaumont B210 H.su 

Texas, Sour Lake 9333 14.40 

Louisiana. Jennings ...... ,9090 14.60 

California, Bakersfield 9589 14.20 

Russia. Baku 8805 14. SO 

There is a larger variation in the fuel value 
of coal than there is in the fuel value of 
petroleum For convenience of comparison of 
petroleum and coal, it is assumed that 1 pound 




Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C. 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, CaJ. 




WM. WAI.LACB 



B. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 



WALLACE & CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, W\ ft tF\ Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, I* g\l K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I Vfc U PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COAL1NGA, CAL. 




F^ANY-iCAPAC I TV 



WARREN m^iLErf^oT*K 

WARREN". OHIO. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



of average petroleum will evaporate 15 pounds 

of water from and at 212 deg. F. as compared 

with 1 pound of coal of 2,000 pounds. Most of 

the petroleum in Texas, Louisiana and California 

comes in competition with the poorer grades of 

coal produced in ansKas and Indian Territory 
and with that imported into San Francisco: 

Pounds of Barrels of 

water evap- petroleum 

orated at to equal 

2t: : F. per ton of 

pounds of coal of 

Fuel. combustibles. 2,000 lbs. 
Petroleum, 16° to 40, aver... 15.0 

Anthracite, Pennsylvania.... 9.S 4.2 

Pittsburg, Pa., lump 10.0 4.3 

Pocahontas. W. Va, lump... 10.5 4.5 

Cumberland, Md„ lump 10.0 4.3 

Ohio, Hocking Val., lump.... S.O 3.5 

Indiana, block, lump 9.5 4.1 

Indiana, ordinary run of mine 7.8 3.4 

Kansas, average run of mine 7.3 3.2 

Indian Territory, average.... 7.5 3.3 

British Columbia, Nanaimo.. 7.3 3.2 

British Colum., Co-operative. S.9 3.8 

"Washington. Carbon Hill.... 6.2 2.7 

Cardiff, lump, Wales 10.0 4.3 

The best fuel results are secured when petro- 
leum is atomized by compressed air that has 
been heated by the escaping product of com- 
bustion. Steam is most generally used for 
this purpose. Fuel petroleum that is to be 
transported in ships or stored within buildings, 
should not contain any naphtha cl other light 
constituents. It should have a flash test at 
from y70 deg. to 220 deg. F. Its gravity should 
be from .9333 to .9032, or from 20 deg. to 25 
deg. Baume. Much heavier fuel oils have been 
used successfully, but they are more apt to clog 
the strainers and to carry a percentage of water 
in suspension. The oils of heavier gravities, when 
sold by measure and free from water, have given 
results almost equal to the lighter grades. One 
of the main conditions necessary for economical 
results is to have the petroleum properly ato- 
mized and mixed with the right proportion of 
air. It is also important that the combustion take 
place in a chamber that is partially separated from 
the cold sheets of a boiler by fire brick or asbestos. 
Where the space in the combustion chamber will 
permit, an arch of fire brick is built over the 
grate bars within 5 or 6 inches of the bottom of 
the boiler and parallel to it, about every fourth 
brick being left out. Inside of this open arch 
a checkenvork of loose brick should be placed, 
upon which the atomized petroleum should 
spray. The isolated condition of this com- 
bustion chamber causes a thorough mixture 
and an intense heat. In marine boilers space 
may not allow this arrangement. In such 
boilers the sides and back smhould be lined with 
fire brick, and an arch be projected from the 
bridge (well) one-third of the height of the 
fire box. Good combustion does not produce any 
smoke. 

Internal combustion engines using crude pe- 
troleum, refined petroleum and naphtha have 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tight and Slack Work. 



OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 



WliiteSpruceSaves and Heading 

all ready to set up for Fish, 
Pickles or Lard packages of 
any size. 



Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 
Heading for Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Beef, Etc., Etc. 



Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
. Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous attention to alt Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Houlton,Ore. 



OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern BIdg., 
Chicago. Ills. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 







Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



• '^_ 



READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 

=| 1STHEBEST | = =— 

Rh HRE>orkivr r*n 509 mission street 
. n. ncKKurN uu. 8AN FRANCISC0 , C al. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



been successfully operated, and arc thr most 
ng 46 per cent ovei the high 
efficiency of the oombination of boiler ami en- 
gine with triple expansion and oondensor. The 
following comparisons are based on the indi- 
catcil horsepower per weight of .5 III pounds, 
which is equal to 1 barrel oi ordinary crude 
petroleum, which under favorable condition will 
evaporate IS pounds of water per pound of pe- 
troleum, and that one brake horsepower can be 
secured for mthc evaporation of lt> pounds of 
water. For comparison there are 310 pounds of 
naphtha, and 310 pounds are used of natural 

High duty engines, using best lump coal under 
boiler 310 pounds equal 190 brake horse power 

hours. 

High duty engines using petroleum under 
boilers 310 pounds (1 barrel) equal 291 brake 
horsepower hours. 

Internal combustion engines using crude pe- 
troleum 310 pounds (1 barrel) equal 424 brake 
horsepower hours. 

Diesel internal combustion engines using crude 
petroleum 310 pounds (1 barrel) equal 517 brake 
horsepower hours. 

Automobile internal combustion using 70 deg. 
B. naphtha pounds (1.4 barrels) equal 530 brake 
horsepower hours. 

Natural gas high duty engines, 10 cubic feet 
per horsepower, 310 pounds (6,800) cubic feet 
equal 680 brake horsepower hours. 

Faking the internal combustion using crude 
petroleum which will give 424 brake horse- 
power hours, or in other words will furnish 
1 horsepower for 424 hours, and using it as the 
standard the percentage of the power secured 
by the same weight of fuel for the different 
methods would be as follows: Coal, 43 per 
cent ; high duty steam engines using petro- 
leum under boilers, 68 yi per cent; internal 
combustion engines using petroleum, 100 per cent; 
Diesel engine (standard), 122 per cent; auto- 
mobile motor engines, 125 per cent; natural gas 
engine, 160 per cent. 



The Rockefeller Sons 



John D. Rockefeller, Jr., is described as, like 
most of the Rockefellers, very modest in his way 
of living and quite inconspicuous in his dress. No 
one would suspect in the quietly dressed, gentle- 
manly fellow, the son of the richest man in the 
world. He is tall, measuring nearly six feet, but 
rather slender in build. His complexion, like 
that of his father, is dark, and like his father, 
he wears a rather heavy black mustache. He is 
very fond of dogs and has extensive kennels at 
his country place at Greenwich, Conn. Several 
of his dogs have taken prizes at the dog shows. 

The most important of his many offices is the 
membership on the board of the United States 
Steel corporation. Previously he had also been 
elected a director of the Standard Oil Company, 
-Missouri Pacific Railway Company, Colorado 
Fuel and Iron Company, Delaware, Lackawanna 
& Western Railroad Company. He was also 
made a trustee of the University of Chicago. 

Wall street now believes that he will have to 
gi ve up all of these positions unless his health 
should improve. Men who have sat at the same 



ORIGINAL MOUNTAIN 

The BULLFROG EXTENSION MINING COMPANY is on Original 
Mountain, which is the most active part of the camp of Bullfrog. I In- company 
has installed a very complete hoisting equipment. They have also started shaft 
No. 2, which has been vigorously pushed with a double shift of men and has 
been vigorously pushed with a double shift of men and has already opened up 
the rich green ore that has made the Original famous. This shaft is only a few 
feet from the side line of the Original Bullfrog. The BULLFROG EXTEN- 
SION has enormous ledges ranging from milling values to many thousand dollars 
per ton, as shown by assay of picked samples. World-famous engineers' reports 
will be sent on request, verifying the recent phenomenal strike of tellurium ore. 

A little stock left at 35 cents per share. A big advance November 25th. 
This same stock is now selling on the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 
at 37 to 41 cents, the first instance in the history of the Exchange where their 
price is higher than that of a company. 

Those who bought this stock in the summer can now sell it at an advance of 
100 per cent. We candidly believe that those who buy now at 35 cents can make 
a similar or a greater profit in the next few months. 

The company owns a great mine and it is paid for. They have big ledges of 
rich ore. We are confident that there is nothing better in Nevada in any com- 
pany at any price. This stock will make you money. 

Try it. s 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 



Rialto Building, A 10 



San Francisco, Cal 



MANANA 

is the time many of you are going to advertise. Manana is Spanish for the time that never 
comes — to-morrow. 

New possibilities and opportunities for business development come only to those who act 
to-day. 

If a thing is worth doing at all it is worth doing now. The main thing is to make a 
start. To begin advertising to-day instead of to-morrow brings results one day nearer — or brings 
you one day nearer finding out if results are to be had. It identifies you one day earlier as one 
of the old advertisers who have built up a prosperous business by judicious advertising. To 
begin to-day gets you in touch with people who are going to buy, next week or next month, 
just the kind of a machine you sell. 

Change your advertising copy frequently. If you should see the same news printed in 
your morning paper day after day you would soon stop reading it and get another. Just the 
same with the man who reads your advertisement. If he sees the same ideas expressed each 
week you lose his attention. Change your copy frequently and the results of your advertising 
will increase. 

Call upon us for advertising rates and particulars, and do it to-day. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



directors' table with young Mr. Rockefeller do 
not believe, however, that his recovery can be 
expected in the near future. Should he die, then 
his cousin, William G. Rockefeller, would step 
into his place, as heir presumptive to the greatest 
trust on earth. 

William G. Rockefeller is now about thirty- 
seven 3'ears old. He was graduated from Yale in 
1892, and immediately afterward entered busi- 
ness under the direction of his father. He made 
a very apt pupil and showed that he inherited 
much of the ability which gave his father and his 
uncle the reputation of being the richest men on 
earth. Even Thomas W. Lawson admitted this, 
for in his story of "Frenzied Finance," he refers 
to William G. Rockefeller as the "able and ex- 
cellent business son of William Rockefeller." 
Mr. Lawson thought him of more promise than 
his cousin John D. Jr., and so he suggested him 
as the probable future head of Standard Oil. 



W. K. OIL COMPANY. 

Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Coal- 
inga, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 12th day of October, 1905, 
j.n assessment of two and one-half cents (2y 2 c.) 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the 
W. K. Oil Company, payable immediately to J. 
W. Pauson, Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, Room 501 Parrott building. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
22d day of November, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 15th 
day of December, 1905, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. 

J. W. PAUSON, 

Secretary. 

San Francisco, Cal., October 17, 1905. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Pittsburg Oil Company 

Location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Location of works, Coalinga, 
Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting- of the 
Pittsburg Oil Company, held on the 23rd day of 
October, A. D. 1905, an assessment of four (4) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of this corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the company, at the office of the com- 
pany, rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Any stock upon which this 
assessment shall remain, unpaid on Saturday, De- 
cember 2, A. D. 1905, will be delinquent and adver- 
tised for sale at public auction, and, unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, 
December 28th, A. D., 1905, at 11 A. M., to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. J. LAYMANCE, Secretary 

Office — Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIELD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase of Mints and Prosprcts 
References on application 



STOC KS 

I handle Mines and Oil Lands and Act 
as Fiscal Agent fop Good Securities 

D. L. HEALY 

BROKER 

Member of San Francisco & 
Tonopah Mining Exchange 

524 MILLS BUILDING 

Telephone Main 5747 San Francisco, Cal 



INVESTMENTS 



SAN JOSE CREMATION ASS'N. 

Now Incorporated. 

PRICES OF STOCK TODAY, PER SHARE $10. 

Prices December Next, $15; July, 1906, $20; 

December, 1906, $25, or Par. 

The Oakland Association has proven a great suc- 
cess, yielding in dividends last year IS per cent to 
first investors. Prices advanced in three years 
from $10 to $27 per share. Equal or better results 
may be expected from the San Jose Cremation 
Association. 



Pays iyz per cent or $160 per share, t*\ 
accrued interest. 



o months* 



160 shares of Oakland Crematory Association at 
$27 per share. Has paid eight dividends since 
March, 1904, of 30c each. Dividends hereafter 
semi-annually, December and June. 



300 shares Columbian Oil Co., at 50c. Par value 
$1. Nineteen wells in operation. Dividends to be 
paid this fall. 



30,000 5 per cent bonds of the Turlock Irrigation 
District at par, denomination $400 each; issued 
1902, expire in 1942. 



125 shares of the Phoenix Savings Building and 
Loan Co. 



Water front property at $55 per foot. 



Business property under a lease paying 6"per 
cent on $50,000. "Will sell for $36,000. 



FOR STOCK AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 

W. E. BARNARD, 

746 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

As a special inducement to new subscribers and to induce delinquent subscribers to "settle up" we 
will give as a premium to all new subscribers to the Pacific Oil Reporter, or to old subscribers who 
pay their subscription one year in advance, a copy of the Coalinga Map, printed on a fine quality bond 
paper, without extra charge. These maps sell for 50c. and are well worth the money. Subscribe 
for the Pacifie Oil Reporter and secure one free. 

SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

190.. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Gentlemen: 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil Reporter for months, commencing 

with the issue. % inclosed herewith in payment thereof. 

NAME 

Subscription Price 

OneYear, - - $2.50 ADDRESS 

Six Months, - - 1.50 

Three" - - - 1.00 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



13 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE. 



forma 
Stock and I inge in the formal - 

hcM tor the week ending Wednesday, Nov. Stir. 

iatril — 

144 shares at 

1,555 shares .it 



ss 

56 

- shares at 50 

Imperial — 

100 shares at I 

Kern (New) — 

50 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

10,000 shares at 

( Vviilental — 

1 50 shares at 

I shares at 



Oil City Petroleum- 
500 shares at . 
500 shares at 
500 shares at . 
3,300 shares at 

Twenty-Eight-*- 

200 shares at 
20 shares at 

Union Oil — 

10 shares at 
10 shares at 



.09 

. .75 

.04 
.03 

.70 
.72 
.73 
.75 

. 9.00 
. 10.00 

.160.00 
.161.00 



Following are the latest 
of oil companies listed on 
and Oil Exchange : 



quotations for stocks 
the California Stock 



Alma 

Arline 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. 
California-Standard . . 

Caribou 

Central Point Con. . . 
Chicago Crude (New) 

Claremont 

Forty 

Four 

Hanford 

Home 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern (New) 

Linda . Vista 

Monarch of Arizona.. 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va. . 
( )il City Petroleum . . 

Peerless 

Piedmont 

Pittsburg 

Reed Crude 

Senator 

Shawmut 

Soverign 

Superior 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 

Twenty-Eight 

Union 

Wabash 

West Shore 

Wolverine 



Cer... 



Bid. 

.40 
.40 
.30 

■ gfi 

.40 



. 1.75 
.08 
.871:, 
.50 
.26 

.190.00 
.50 



13.00 
.20 
.21 



Asked. 

.26 

"Y.15 



.52 
.30 

'".55 
.20 

15.00 
.23 
.25 
.20 



13.50 
.08 
.07 
.15 
.75 
.03 
.75 



30 



.10 

.24 

1.60 



.77': 
.04 
.80 
7.50 
.07 
.11. 



.20 

.05 
. 5.00 

.60 
. 8 . 50 
.155.00 

.30 
. 1.00 



.36 

.2o 
.06 



10.00 
165.00 

1 .75 
1.00 



J. 8. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICB. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1552 



MAPS 

The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for OH or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants Tor Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX 237 




W. E. YOULB 



WANTED 

Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

] Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 111B K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 
::^==^z= in any country :===^= 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, Coalinga, California 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RELIABILITY OUR MOTTO 



BARLOW & HILL 



The up-to-date Map Makers 



BAKERSFIELD, 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



15 



Private Booms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



315-317-319-321-323 

Piie St,. S. F. 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 

FIRST=CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs o? All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MT1 GO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SEVENTEEN [17] NEW 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 

Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros .' Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 

17 
Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 




110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 



IS IF. 





The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for thr pro 
motion ol any legitimate piopoM 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing, Trrt 
gatlon, Mercantile, Pateitj c: 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from twc 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The accuracy and reliability of STEVENS Rifles 
and Shotguns have won for them an enviable repu- 
tation the world over. Our no-page 

BOOK ON FIREARMS, FREE. 

It contains a full description of STEVENS Arms, 
also valuable information on hunting, the proper 
care of firearms, notes un sights, ammunition, etc. 
You should have it. Send two 2-cent stamps to 
cover postage. 

■ Stevens=naynard. Jr.," . $3.00 

" Crack Shot," 4.00 

"Stevens Little Krag," . . 5,00 

"Favorite, No. 17," . . . 6.00 

CLEVER RIFLE PUZZLE sent FREE.postpaid 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 

P.O. But 4093. 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS.. U.S. A. 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT& LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 2791 g an FranclsCO 



L ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

4t6, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., • San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We cany the Largest Stock. Our price* are 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main. IISS. 

PATENT S — Unlted states and 

— 1 ■■— *— — — — Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



Park Building, 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 

of machine for oil and gas works. It , ,, ,, . 

mounted upon trucks separate. '. ts tests ran 9 e from shaIlow water wells to a limit of 2825 * eet ,n de P th ' but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumpi, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY i 

AKRON.OHIO 
Harron, Rickard & McCone, California Agents, San Frandsco 




16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



-MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 



MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZ= CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



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Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



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California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCALE EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 



ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 



Phone James 7116 



California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Oil Chemists 

TJT p; g* rwr » 

CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM 

Calorific Value, Fractional 
.Distillation, Refining, Vis- 
Fcosity, Freezing, Asphel-, 

tine, Sand and Water, Etc. 

Kerosene, Asphaltum, Boiler 
Feed and Drinking Water. 

Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 





m^< 




Vol. 7, No. 3 




San Francisco, Cal., November 18, 1905. Price lO Cents. 









mTr- 




.--'.- 



~~^& 



.-jd^&^^^ 



Vl ■ .1" 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1657 



LESCHENS 

DRILLING CABLES 
X SAND LINES. 
A ^ CASINGXTUBING LINES 



BRANCH OFFICES 
Z WAREHOUSES: 

NEW YORK DENVER 

92 CENTRE ST. 17 1 7-23 ARAPAHOE ST. 

CHICAGO SAN FRANCI5C0 

R I ALTO EfllD'o. 



137 E.LAKE ST. 



,.iil: 



WIRE ROPE 

OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 




A.LESCHEN Z SON§ ROPEJGO 

920-922 \ NORTH FIRST ST. 
930-932/ ST. LOUIS,M0. 



WE ARE AGENTS FOB 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean' 
ing out, pumping, pulb 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 









For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, November 18, 1905 Number 3 

DAPIEMP All DCDfiDTCD Wednesday, November 8th was the twenty- * development fund of say $3000. The actual 

r/\Uir l\j UIL nLr Un 1 En fifrf) . mnivvrsarv of tllc (Icath of Col E L an „ iunt ,, lisCl i wou i d be ^ 50 oo, but the cost of 

Published Wccklv. ' , . ., , _, ,. 

Drake, who drilled the first oil well in the raising this amount must be considered. If this 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. , , , , , 

,._,.,._ , ,,. , , . I'nited States, laying the foundation of one of sf ock was sold at ten cents a share, the proposi- 
Indorsrd by California Petroleum Miners Ass n. 

the greatest industries in this country. When, tion meriting the price, the cost of selling this 

Maria R. Winn. Proprietor. ; n | ( sijj. } )c appeared in Titusville, Pa., and an- stock would be no more, while the development 

I S. Eastman- , Edito r and Manager. . . |limnmi h ; s ; ntention f drilling for oil he was fund raised would be about ten times as great. 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS considered a fanatic. With mute persistency, This would be better for the investor and bet- 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California however he overcame obstacle after obstacle ana ter for the mining business at large. An inves- 

e ep one, u s l discouragement after discouragement, until, in tor would much rather have one thousand shares 

TERMS. August, 1859, he electrified the world with the of stock in a dividend paying enterprise than ten 

? n< \} ear L * 2 ,'ln discovery of a new source of illumination that thousand, or, for that matter, one hundred thou- 

hi\ Months 1 -->U 

Three Months 1 .00 cou ld be obtained in quantities from the depths sand shares of stock in an enterprise that has ex- 

Single Copies unassuming hausted its treasury and has nothing but a piece 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. fe 

, r .... u ' -d . i rs j rw~. manner he never sought publicity. Neither did of undeveloped ground. It is a very lucky corn- 
Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft b 

or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil | le profit greatly by his discovery— those aiding pany that can develop a mine with a few thou- 

Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms . . , , . 11 

31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied hlnl '" hl * work gobbling up the lions share of sand dollars. 

by writer's name and address, not necessarily for the fi nanc ; a l benefit and even trying to steal the 

publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. . . .. , 

credit of the discovery. The State of Pennsyl- The flash point of kerosene in Australia has 

Entered at the Postoflke at San Francisco, Cal- . , „, , on , . . , 

ifornia, as second-class matter. vania has not been ungrateful for the discovery been raised from 73 deg. to 80 deg, in spite of 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. that was the intuition of one of its greatest in- the protest of the Colonial Oil Company, which 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- dustries. In 1873 the Legislature awarded him >s the Australian alias of the ubiquitous Standard 

nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- ^ ^.^ rf $ , 5QQ ^^ wh;ch he rece ; ved Oil Trust. The determination of the central 

nized buyers: . . . . r , a l- 

COAlinga. durin g the last eight years of his life. Col. customs administration to fix the flashing point or 

, Pric , e Drake's widow is still living under moderate cir- standard of kerosene at 80 deg. F. is the result 

Gravity. per barrel. , , 

22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 cumstances. There are numerous men who have of pressure upon the department by experts and 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22^ built up immcnse f ortl ,nes through the oil in- others. The flashing point is the degree at which 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^.^ ^ ^ kerQsene k considered safe for use> and at which 

l4 o gravky or better ' '. i 8c cient income for Mrs. Drake to enable her to * will not readily explode or ignite. For many 

santa maria. spend her declining years in a manner becoming years past the standard in Victoria has been 73 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 the wife of one of the great discoverers of the deg., and no oil was permitted to go into con- 

25 deg., or better - 22y 2 n ; neteentn centU rv. sumption as kerosene under that standard. Any 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. J ^^ ^ flf ^^ standard had t0 be marked 

Tiona $1.71 

Pennsylvania 1-61 The days of the cheap mining stock fakir are "dangerous," so that consumers might not un- 

Second Sand 1-41 numbered. Throughout the country investors wittingly incur risks. Each other state had its 

g ' are learning that it is practically impossible to own act relating to kerosene, and the standards 

Newcastle 1 ■ j8 

Q abc |] _ 121 develop a dividend paying mine with a few thou- varied. In New South Wales the degree was 

North Lima 96 sand dollars. Companies formed with a small 1 10 open test, which was equalto 83 deg. closed 

South Lima 91 treasury stock] say fi ve l lun dred thousand shares test, used in Victoria. Under the Common- 
Indiana 91 ... , - i 

gomers { .91 out of a million, and selling stock at one cent a wealth Customs Act, mineral oil and mineral 

Ragland +9 s hare with a par value of one dollar, no longer spirits are prohibited exports," unless imported 

Corsicana, I'gbt 91 appea j to t h e investor. Of course some com- under and subject to such restrictions as may be 

^orsican, ...u\ ' 1^36 panies have been developed into dividend payers declared by proclamation." It was urged that 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 by the sa l e f one or two cent stock. But the the standard had been raised in India, and that 

30 to 30y 2 gravity |0 remains that for even- success there has been similar action was contemplated in England. The 

30 1 ■■ to 31 gravity " ' , , , . , , , u 

31 to 31 ' -j gravity 4o an unfortunate number of failures. The sale ot department therefore decided to make the stan- 

311 1, t0 32 gravity million shares of one cent stock means dard in Australia 80 deg. 

32 gravity and over -^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Production of Petroleum in 1904 



(Concluded.) 

Louisiana. — This is but the third year in 
which this State has produced petroleum, yet its 
record for 1904 shows a production of 6,611,419 
barrels. Of this amount only 2,941,419 were 
marketed, which latter quantity shows a gain of 
220 per cent over that of 1903. Louisiana is now 
eighth in the rank of producing States, and ninth 
in rank when the value is considered. If the en- 
tire production of the State was considered it 
would rank seventh, next to Pennsylvania. The 
entire production for the first seven months of 
1904 was but one-tenth of that of the last five 
months. A new and prolific section to the south- 
east of the original Jennings pool was developed 
in 1904, in August, 1904, a well 
started flowing through 2%-inch tubing 
at the rate of about 5,000 barrels per day, 
Another well, which came in September 8, pro- 
duced at the rate of 16,000 barrels per day 
for the first week from a depth of 1900 feet. This 
well, by the close of 1904, produced 1,280,000 
barrels, averaging nearly 11,228 barrels per day, 
which probably is greater than the output of any 
single well for the same period on this continent. 

The developments at Jennings indicate that 
there is a buried anticlinal in this locality run- 
ning northeast and southwest, with well-marked 
slopes to the southeast and northwest. As there 
is a difference of more than 100 feet in the depth 
of the wells located on the slpoes of this anticlinal, 
some salt water is encountered on the southeast 
slope. The extent of this field has not yet been 
determined. The production for the last four 
months of 1904 was about 40,000 bar- 
rels per day, and at the close of the 
year was nearly 60,000 barrels per day. 
There is more or less loose sand coming up with 
the petroleum in most of these wells, which it is 
necessary to keep back by a strainer or by clatted 
casing. In the Jennings field about 95 wells have 
been completed up to the close of 1904. Of this 
number 60 were productive, and 40 are produc- 
ing at the close of the year. The pool was opened 
up by the Scott Heywood well in the spring of 
1901. The original wells were small producers. 

The Welsh field, 12 miles west of Jennings, 
produced 35,892 barrels in 1904. Operations 
have not been so vigorous in this field, and the 
wells are not so productive. The petroleum is 
used for fuel principally, although a portion is 
used for lubrication. 

The Anse la Butte field, located about 6 miles 
north of Lafayette, has produced some petroleum. 
The field has not been vigorously developed, and 
the indications are that its production could be 



largely increased if a profitable market could be 
secured. 

- Near the close of the year operations were be- 
gun in Caddo County, in the extreme north- 
western corner, which bid fair to develop both pe- 
troleum and natural gas. More or less natural 
gas and petroleum have been found in Sulphur, 
Calcasieu, Lake Charles and Cowley, which are 
at present undeveloped. The great area of flat, 
almost level plains in this State no doubt have 
covered up numerous irregularities of the under- 
lying and older strata, where structural conditions 
exist favorable for the accumulation of petroleum 
and natural gas, that can only be located by the 
drilling of wells and careful deductions secured 
from their records. The gravity of the petroleum 
produced runs from 21 degrees to 25 degrees 
Baume. 

Wyoming. — The only crude petroleum pro- 
duced and shipped in Wyoming in 1904 was from 
wells located in Natrona county. There are 13 
wells, which will yield on an average eight bar- 
rels each day. The crude is found in sand under- 
lying shale, and is hauled by teams in tank wa- 
gons to Casper, where it is refined. It is a per- 
fect natural lubricating oil, has no trace of as- 
phalt, 2 per cent of water, no wax, and is green 
in color. Yields only a small percentage of light 
oils of any nature. Pure lubricating 98 per cent, 
and 2 per cent impurities. Although it is a nat- 
ural lubricant, it is further refined at the com- 
pany's refinery. It has a very high fire test and a 
very low cold test. The crude is 26 deg. Baume, 
flashes at 275 deg. F., burns at 340 deg. F., and 
stands a cold test of 17 deg. F. below zero. Pro- 
duces, when refined, cylinder stock of 698 deg. F. 
fire test, which are the qualities required for in- 
ternal combustion engines. There were 1 1 ,542 
barrels marketed in 1904, valued at $80,794, 
amounting to $7 per barrel, as compared with 
8,960 barrels, valued at $62,720, in 1903. 

Colorado. — There was an increase of 17,834 
barrels in the yield of Colorado in 1904, as com- 
pared with 1903, and the production was the 
largest credited to this State since 1894. The 
output in 1904 was 501,763 barrels, as compared 
with 483,925 in 1903. The average price was 
$1.15 per barrel, and the total valuation was 
$578,038. 

The greatest portion of the increase came from 
the deep wells drilled in the Florence field, which 
in some instances found a fourth pay streak at a 
depth of 2100 feet, which did not exhaust the 
Fort Pierre shales of the Cretaceous. The deep- 
est well in the field is 3650 feet, which was dry. 
The formation was such, however, that there is 
a probability of finding pay beds at that depth. 



There were 80 producing wells operated during 
1904, and about 120 wells have been abandoned 
since the field was first opened up in 1887.- 

The Boulder field in 1904 did not produce one- 
half of its production in 1903, although there 
were a number of wells completed during the 
year 1903. The uncertainty of production and 
the failing wells has robbed this field of its prom- 
inence, which was given to it about the close of 
1902. 

Alaska. — There was no development of pe- 
troleum in commercial quantities in any of the 
Alaska fields during 1904, although a number of 
wells are drilled, and there are abundant surface 
shows of both petroleum and natural gas. 

There are four known localities in which these 
indications are found, beginning with Cape Yak- 
tag, northwest of Mount St. Elias. About 100 
miles northeast the Kayak, or Controller Bay, 
field is located, and is about 40 miles southeast of 
the eastern delta of the Copper River. The 
Cooks Inlet field is near its western shore. The 
Cold Bay field is located near where the Alaska 
Peninsula leaves the mainland. 

There are remarkable surface shows in the way 
of seepages, springs and pools of petroleum and 
springs or flows of natural gas in all four of the 
districts named, but especially in the Controller 
Bay district. The Cooks Inlet district is about 
300 miles west of the Controller Bay district, and 
the Cold Bay district is about 150 miles west 
from the Cooks Inlet district. Up to the close 
of 1904 about 20 wells have been started, many 
of which failed to reach a depth of 500 feet, ow- 
ing to difficulty in drilling in inclined strata. One 
well was drilled to a depth of 1700 feet. Of 
this number 15 were drilled in the Controller 
Bay district. There were six wells drilled by 
the Alaska Steam Coal and Petroleum Company. 
None of them were over 600 feet in depth. Pe- 
troleum is reported to have been found in small 
quantities in 4 of them. In several of these wells 
there was considerable showing of petroleum and 
natural gas, yet their entire production was but 
a few barrels. 

The quantity of the petroleum produced is of 
a superior quality generally of a paraffin base, and 
some of it closely resembles Pennsylvania petro- 
leum. 

Dr. George C. Martin again, in 1904, visited 
the petroleum and coal fields at Controller Bay, 
Cook Inlet and Cold Bay. and found the general 
structural conditions of the Controller districts 
to include a complex series of semimetamorphosed 
beds, some petroleum bearing shales, a succession 
of coal measures, a series of Miocene sandstone 
conglomerates and shales, a few igneous rocks, 
and a large area of alluvial and glacial deposits. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Petroleum seepages are very abundant in the Con- 
troller Bay region. Those which arc hc-t known 
are situated about 4 miles cast of Katalla. The 
flow of oil here is very large and good-sized pools 
have collected on the surface. Another group of 
seepages is on the headwaters of Hurls Creek. 
where the petroleum maj he seen oozing from the 
joints and bedding planes of the carbonaceous 
shales and volcanic ash beds which are exposed in 
the deep ravines. The quantity of petroleum here 
showing is not so large as at the seepages east of 
Katalla. but it is more widespread. The small 

stream between Hurls Creek and Bering River 
has several seepages along its bank. Seepagi 
cur, too. in other parts of the peninsula between 
Bering Lake and Controller Bay. and in the re- 
gion west of Katalla. The so-called "Nitchawak 
region," which is situated on the banks of the 
various branches of Nitchawak River and in the 
vicinity of Nitchawak, also presents a number of 
seepages. Some of these are located on the banks 
of a small lake, which is reported to be at times 
covered with petroleum. The small creeks which 
enter Little Nitchawak River from the north 
have a number of seepages on their banks, in some 
of which oil issues directly from the rock, which 
is here a shale. The canyon north of Lone Baldy 



Mountain and between it and Ragged Mountain 
contain a number of seepages, in which the oil 
may be seen oozing from the cracks ,,| the roi k. 

A strong Row of uas bubbles to tin surface of 
the water at a number of places along the lower 

course of Katalla River. In places this flow is so 
Strong that it can be heard for a distance of sev- 
eral hundred feet. The composition of the gas is 
not known. Several large sulphur springs issue 
from the northern hank of Bering River within 
a mile on either side of the Indian village. 

Mosl of the seepages between Katalla ami Ber- 
ing River fall approximately on three straight 
lines, each having a general northeastly-southwest 
direction. These lines are nearly parallel to the 
strike in their vicinity, and are undobutedly in- 
fluenced in position and direction by the struc- 
ture.. They probably represent the outcrops of 
oil-bearing strata. The easternmost of them is 
on the western flank, but very close to the crest 
of the Chilkat Creek anticline. The westernmost 
is on the eastern flank and about half way down 
the Katalla anticline. Those in the valley of 
Burls Creek are in a less certain structural posi- 
tion. The gas springs on the banks of Katalla 
River are probably located on or near the crest of 
the Katalla anticline. 



Aletvs from the Field 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria, Cal., Nov. 15. — While there 
is no boom in the Santa Maria field development 
continues with most all of the companies. The 
production of oil, which in 1903, barely reached 
the 1,000,000 barrel mark, will this year near the 
4,000,000 barrel mark. This production is ex- 
ceeded on the whole coast only by the Kern River 
fields. Eventually the Santa Maria field will ex- 
ceed them all. 

Recently some oil has been found in San Luis 
Obispo county, around Edna and another well 
nearer to San Luis town. But so far these wells 
yield but heavy gravity oils. The wells are shal- 
lower in the San Luis Obispo field and the oils are 
the heavier for it. William Logan, the well 
known former superintendent of the Western 
Union Oil Company, has organized a company 
mostly of Santa Marians to drill on property near 
Edna, San Luis Obispo county. 

Regarding news in the field, the Union Oil 
Company has secured its pipe line right of ways 
from the county in a most satisfactory manner. 
The Santa Maria Graphic is sponsor for the fol- 
lowing regarding the recent shipping facilities or 
the Union: Four immense tank steamers have 
just been purchased by the L T nion Oil Company 



and will be opearted on this coast in conjunction 
with the vessels that are now running. In the 
near future the company will build several gi- 
gantic oil carriers, and the entire line will be op- 
erated under the name of the Union Steamship 
Company. These four steamers, the Lansing, 
Washtenaw, Roma and Argyle will ply between 
Port Harford, Point Richmond and other points. 
They have a capacity as follows: Lansing, 47,- 
000 barrels; Wasthenaw, 28,500 barrels, Roma, 
27,500 barrels; Argyle, 25,000 barrels. Several 
more steamers are to be built. Port Harford and 
Avila will become great shipping points. 

We have as yet said little of the Graciosa Oil 
Company. In some future issue we shall give it 
the special attention its development and that of 
the Western Union also deserve. The Graciosa 
has just completed No. 5 well. It is bored to a 
depth of 3200 feet, passing through several strata 
of oil bearing sands. It will produce several 
hundred barrels daily when ready for delivery. 
The Graciosa well No. 2, while the tools were 
still in the well, started to flow, and has been 
flowing for over two years whenever uncapped at 
the rate of about 400 barrels per day of about 28 
degrees. This company owns its own pipe line 
to Casmalia, a station on the Southern Pacific, 
whence the oil is distributed north and south. Mr. 



A. Phillips is the successful manager of this com- 
pany in the field here. 

I he Pinal Oil Company is paying another 
monthly dividend; and has only halt its wells on 
tap. 

Mall & Hall are at last making better head- 
way on the Coblentz Oil Co.'s well. Solid shale 
formation with layers of asphalt shows it to be 
s milar to the neighboring proven oil territory. 

\\ e hope to hear something from the Pennsj 1- 
vania Oil Company; they are in oil and coming 
to the level of the productive oil bearing stratum 
of this territory. 

Of the Recruit Oil Co.'s borings in Cat Can- 
yon, we hear but little. They are down 2600 
feet and still deeping. L. E. B. 



COALINGA. 



Coalinga, Cal., Nov. 15, 1905. 
Pittsburg Coalinga well No. 2 is down 1800 
feet in 8-inch drive pipe. 

Well No. 1 of the Arline Oil Co. has been 
making very fair progress with its fishing jobs 
and within the next week expect to pull the 8- 
inch casing. 

W. K. well No. 1 is over 2400 feet deep, with 
4%-inch pipe. 

Prof. E. T. Dumble, vice-president and gen- 
eral manager of the Kern Trading and Oil Co., 
and Prof. J. Owen, general field manager of 
same, spent a couple of days in the field looking 
after the interests of their company. 

Wabash well No. 6 has shut the water off 
between 1085 and 1100 feet and is now drilling 
ahead. 

North Eastern Oil Co. is pulling their Sc- 
inch casing. 

Kaweah No. 2, after a delay of four or five 
days, having its old rig replaced, has again re- 
sumed drilling. It is thought that this well will 
be drilled a little deeper than its No. 1 well. 

St. Paul Fresno Oil Co. is setting up two 50- 
barrel tanks. 

The rig for No. 2 well of the R. H. Herron 
Co. on the W. M. & M. lease, formerly the R. 
V. Ellis lease, is completed, and the company 
expects to start drilling shortly. 

Californ'a and New- York Oil Company has its 
new boiler fully installed, one of the best equipped 
in the field. Its No. 1 well furnishes the neces- 
sary gas to fire the boiler. The company com- 
menced to spud in its water well last Monday. 
This will complete a well planned water system. 
We know of no property in this field more eco- 
nomically managed. Its No. 1 has been a per- 
sistent producer; one of the marvels of the field. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Well No. 2 continues to improve and has added 
about 200 barrels to the daily production. 

Work on well No. 1 of the California-Mon- 
arch Oil Company, the well that created such 
excitement a few months ago, is progressing very 
satisfactorily. Well No. 4 shut off the water last 
week with 10-inch drive pipe at 1119 feet, and is 
now in the first oil asnd at 1245 feet. Well No. 
12 has 1485 feet of 10-inch drive in and expect- 
ing to shut off the water any day. Well No. 13 
is cleaned out and is 1950 feet with 8-inch drive. 
The management reports everything going nicely 
and production increasing. 



Foreign Production of Petroleum in 1904 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



DIVIDENDS. 

Oil companies listed on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange have declared dividends as 
follows : 

Monte Cristo 01 

Caribou 07 

The Murchie gold mine at Nevada City is 
driving ahead on the 400 drift and the winze is 
pushing its way below the 700. Exceptionally 
good results are found as development work pro- 
gresses, producing a very high grade of free mill- 
ing ore. 

At the Empire gold mine at Gold Valley, sink- 
ing and drifting continues and conditions there 
show that the ore is richly mineralized. The 
chlorination plant is now in full operation and is 
producing the desired results. 

The tank steamer Argyle was cleared Nov. 4 
for Honolulu with 25,000 barrels of crude oil in 
bulk, valued at $35,000, as its cargo. The tank 
barkentine Fullerton was also cleared the same 
date for Honolulu with 15,000 barrels of crude 
oil, in bulk, valued at $21,000 as its cargo. Both 
vessels were loaded at Port Harford by the Union 
Oil Company of California. 

The first rig has been erected on Lake Titicaca 
in the Peruvian Andes by the Los Angeles oil 
magnates, and drilling will soon be begun. The 
company had put down several shallow holes, and 
from one to twenty feet deep oil of 41 gravity was 
taken out in that section, bringing $5 to $6 a 
barrel. The principal owners of the Titicac Oil 
Company are M. H. and C. F. Whittier. 

The Transport Oil Company operating in the 
Sunset district, struck oil in its No. 2 well on 
Monday at a depth of 1100 feet. Although only 
1 1 feet in the sand the well flowed at a rate of 
250 to 300 barrels the first day. Drilling will 
continue through the sand. An excellent well is 
assured. 



The section of the annual report of the United 
States Geological Survey devoted to the foreign 
production of petroleum in 1904 has been re- 
ceived from the compiler, and, through the cour- 
tesy of the Survey the Reporter's correspondent 
is enabled to present the abstract given below. 
This feature of the report is exceedingly compre- 
hensive, and it contains much matter relating to 
the developments of 1905 as well as 1904. Fol- 
lowing is an advance abstract of this section of 
the report: 

Canada. — Although there are a number oi 
localities in Canada in which petroleum is known 
to exist, extending from Newfoundland to the 
Pacific Coast, in Newfoundland and in the prov- 



troleum and natural gas on the eastern flank of 
the Rocky Mountains, extending from the United 
States line to the Arctic Ocean, which in the 
future will, in all probability, produce large 
quantities of petroleum. 

One of the most important events in the his- 
tory of petroleum production in Canada was the 
passing of an act by the Canadian Government, 
June 8, 1904, reducing the duty on refined pe- 
troleum from 5 cents per imperial gallon to 2% 

cents, and at the same time crude petroleum was 
put on the free list, which formerly paid 5 cents 
per imperial gallon duty, and the government at 
the same time agreed to give a bounty of ll/o 
cents per imperial gallon on all crude produced, 




Party of Eastern Investors who recently came 
A. L. Wisner properties — Steady and 



to California to investigate into the merits of the 
natural flow of oil from Cal. N. Y. No. 1. 



inces of New Brunswick, Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
Cape Breton, Alberta and British Columbia, the 
main supply continues to come from Lamberton 
county Ontario. 

The new Leamington field produced 25,241 
barrels in 1904, which was an increase of about 
24,000 barrels over that of 1903. This field is 
located near the former natural gas field in the 
southeastern portion of Essex county. The 
Moore field is noted for the first time with a 
production of nearly 37,000 barrels, and is lo- 
cated in Moore township, Lamberton countj', 
which county produced 85 per cent of the total 
output of petroleum in Canada. There were 
several new wells drilled in the New Brunswick 
field that were productive of a lubricating petrol- 
eum. A well producing 12 barrels of petroleum 
per day "was drilled in southern Alberta, near 
South Kortany Pass. 

There are numerous natural showings of pe- 



amounting to 52^ cents per barrel, which has 
resulted in increasing the price paid the producer 
of about 12% cents per barrel. 

For the past three years there have been active 
operations in New Brunswick, near Mamram- 
cook, a few miles south of Moncton, by the New 
Brunswick Petroleum Company. 

There are two fields now being operated four 
or five miles apart, known as the Dover and St. 
Joseph's College. In both of these fields there 
have been about 70 wells recently completed, 30 
of which were completed in the Dover field, and 
35 in the original St. Joseph's College field. Dur- 
ing 1904 there were frorra 18 to 25 of these wells 
pumped in each of the fields, most of the produc- 
tion being from 30 wells, and amounting to about 
50 barrels per day. There is considerable varia- 
tion in the depths of the wells, as they vary from 
300 to 500 feet. The petroleum is found in a 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



rather close sand rock. Many of them have been 
loed. 
There are two varieties of petroleum produced, 
one quite hlack and the other dark green. The 
gravity is nearly the same, from 35 degrees t.. 37 
degrees Baume, ami probably of a paraffin base. 
A refinery has been commenced. Very little has 
been marketed. 

The following is a statement of the production 

of crmle petroleum in Canada for the year 1903 

and 1904 hy districts: 

1903. 1004. 

District — Barrels. Barrels. 

Petmlia 350.390 271 

Oil Springs 56.405 75,530 

Botbwell 48,880 47,654 

Moore 36,971 

Leamington 1,190 25,241 

Dutton 21,483 14,217 

Thamesville 5,027 

Wheatley 1,995 4,490 

Raleigh 1,161 3,274 

Pelee Island 1,023 

Blytheswood 660 

Comber 97 

Total 481,504 492,492 

Mexico. — Thus far only a limited quantity of 
petroleum is produced in Mexico, although nu- 
merous companies have developed petroleum. The 
scarcity of coal and the heavy government tax, 
amounting to about $4.35 per barrel on crude 
petroleum and about $9.50 per barrel on refined 
products, is an incentive to find it within the bor- 
ders of the republic. 

There are numerous seepages and showings of 
petroleum back on the main land and along the 
coast line of the Gulf of Mexico reaching from 
the extreme northeastern portion of the State of 
Tamaulipas to Yucatan. They are especially nu- 
merous north of Tampico, along the coast and 
extending west 50 miles to the foothills of the 
mountains. There are also numerous surface in- 
dications reported in the States of Oaxaca and 
Chiapas. The petroleum is generally of a heavy 
gravity and black in color. The most successful 
operation at this date is in the State of Tamaul- 
ipas, fifty miles west of Tampico, operated by the 
Mexican Petroleum Company, where about fif-' 
teen wells have been drilled and petroleum found 
at about 800 feet. Recently some of these wells 
have been drilled deeper, and at about 1,700 feet 
a lighter gravity petroleum was found, reported 
to he of 1,000 barrels capacity per day. A num- 
ber of large iron tanks have been erected at this 
locality and a refinery operated which produces 
asphaltum chiefly. In the State of Vera Cruz 
several wells have produced petroleum in limited 
quantities. Prospecting is still going on. 

There are good showings of petroleum in the 
San Juan Bautista district. State of Tabasco. 
Further northeast, in the State of Campeachy, 



there arc jeeps and spring from which a superior 
article of petroleum has been taken. 1 ! 
tional Tehauntepec Railway has drilled a num- 
ber of wells, and in some of them found petrol- 
eum; and thej have arranged to dull sum.- of 
them deeper, hoping Fi flow oJ I 

gravity, There seems to he- little doubt that this 
republic will in the near future produce consid 
erahle fuel petroleum, which will in part supply 
the coal that is imported and the crude that i< 
now used on some of the locomotives tin fuel 
which is produced in Texas. 

Cuba. — There are numerous indications of pe- 
troleum in Cuba, with a range in gravity from 
that of naphtha to solid bitumen, but as yet no 
commercial development has been produced. 
There are numerous deposits of asphaltum and 




California Monarch No. 1, Sec. 31, 19-15, show- 
oil gushing over derrick and running down a 
ravine. 

shales highly charged with hydrocarbons scatter- 
ed over nearly all of the provinces in the island. 
There seems to be a peculiar condition brought 
about by the volcanic heat that has partially dis- 
tilled the bitumens, whose lighter products have 
been condensed in the crevices of the higher and 
cooler portions of the strata where they are now 
found. How ever, there seems to have been little 
real work done in a swstematic manner by per- 
sons who understand how to make a thorough 
test of the many localities where there are sur- 



of both petroleum and natural 

Santo Domingo.— In the southern central 

portion ol this republic three n 

Azua a well was completed in November, 1904, 

which flowed a considerable quantity of i 
cum at a depth of between 930 and 940 feet. 

The well was drilled by the West India Petro- 
leum Mining and Export Company, of Azua. 
The gravitj is 920 or 22' ._. degrees Baume. It 

contains 2 1 - per cent of sulphur, and in many 
ways is similar to the petroleum found at Beau- 
mont, Texas. Active operations are expected in 
this locality during 1905. 

Trinidad. — This island has not developed any 
light petroleum commercially, although several 
wells have found a limited quantity, dark in color 
and high in gravity. The island continues to 
produce its usual quantity of asphaltum, which 
is exported in quantity to the United States, and 
is used extensively in paving streets and in roof- 
ing. 

Its source is from a lake or basin threequarters 
of a mile from the sea, four miles in circumference 
and of unknown depth, whose internal source 
supplies what is removed, so that there is no 
perceptible change in its level. Liquid asphalt, 
quite hot, accompanied with sulphuretted hydro- 
gen gas, continually boils up in its center. 

Venezuela. — There are numerous deposits 
of asphalt and heavy petroleum reported in Vene- 
zuela, which are immediately south and west of 
the remarkable deposits of asphaltum on the is- 
land of Trinidad. Southwest of Lake Mara- 
caibo there are natural springs of heavy petro- 
leum. Asphalt, petroleum and natural gas are 
reported on the islands of Pederanales, Pesquero 
and Del Plata. The petroleum found on the is- 
land of Pesquero is said to be quite fluid, having 
a specific gravity of 22 \U degrees Baume. No 
commercial production has yet been reported. 

Argentina. — The production of petroleum in 
this republic has almost ceased, as the wells failed 
to produce in sufficient quantity to supply the rail- 
road, which, after a successful trial, returned to 
the use of coal. There are some valuable as- 
phalt deposits, but too far inland to enable them 
to operate successfully. 

Brazil. — Thus far no deposit of petroleum is 
known to exist in Brazil, though very extensive 
deposits of hydrocarbon shales, containing 33 per 
cent of volatile matter, are known to exist. 

Colombia. — Numerous springs of petroleum 
are reported in Colombia as occurring at Rio 
Ajboledos, near the mouth of Magdalena River, 
near Curaharador, and on the L'soda and Iquana 
rivers. No commercial development has been 
made. 



3 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Ecuador. — Ecuador is reported to possess a 
rich petroliferous region near Santa Elena, 
though it has not as yet been exploited. The 
oil is of a very heavy character, having a specific 
gravity carrying between 0.97 and 0.985. A 
large spring in which petroleum is said to flow 
continuously is reported near the Pastaza River, 
forty miles southwest of Canelas. 

Peru. — Peru is the only country in South 
America that refines crude petroleum and secures 
benzine and refined and lubricating products. The 
entire production, however, was only 40 per cent 
of the quantity imported from the United States. 
There are works at Talara and Zorritos. The 
fuel petroleum produced at Talara is exported 
into Chile and there used as fuel on the salt-haul- 
ing railroad of Tarapaca. There were 12,270 
tons or 73,500 barrels of crude petroleum re- 
ported to have been exported from Talara in 
Northern Peru into Chile, replacing the coal that 
was formerly imported. 

The statement of the production of petroleum 
in 1904, in the Zorritos oil field of Peru, fur- 
nished by Mr. Faustino G. Piaggio, who is oper- 
•ating in that field, shows that the production of 
crude petroleum was 2,080,000 gallons; of re- 
fined, 365,000 gallons, and of benzine and gaso- 
line, 46,200 gallons. 

Russia. — The total production in Russia dur- 
ing 1904 was 78,500,905 barrels, an increase in 
1904 over that of 1903 amounting to 2,909,649 
barrels. There was a decline in the production 
for the two years previous to 1904 amounting to 
over 4,500,000 barrels per year, nearly 95 per 
cent of which comes from a limited area neai- 
Baku, on the Caspian Sea. Near the close of 
1904 there was a disastrous strike and an oil fire 
of incendiary origin, which cut down the produc- 
tion for December nearly 4500,000 barrels less 
than that of November. The strike which had 
for some time interfered with active operations 
occurred on December 26, and continued until 
after New Year's. In the mean time 129 rigs, 
mostly producing wells, were destroyed, involv- 
ing an immense loss of structures and of crude 
petroleum. 

There were 239 wells completed in 1904 at 
an average depth of 1,260 feet, whose average 
production was 384 barrels per day. There were 
only 189 wells drilled an average of 1,296 feet, 
whose average production was 317 barrels per 
day in 1903. The increased depth and the fall- 
ing off of the production of the flowing or spout- 
ing wells amounted to but 5y 2 per cent of the 
production in 1904, as compared with 9 per cent 
in 1903. There were 1,555 producing wells that 
at times produced petroleum in 1904. One thou- 
sand four hundred and forty-three were standing 



idle, 327 were being cleaned out and repaired, 
279 were being drilled, 66 were being drilled 
deeper, and 31 wells were trial pumping. 

The total quantity of petroleum exported was 
almost identical with that of the previous year, 
but considerably less than in 1902. There is, 
therefore, a large accumulation of refined pro- 
ducts, mostly kerosene, at Batoun. Of the re- 
fined products, Russia only consumes 5,780,000 
barrels. On the other hand, the consumption of 
fuel oil or mazoot, which is crude petroleum from 
which a small percentage of the lighter products 
have been removed by distillation, amounting to 
nearly 35,000,000 barrels. There was a general 
increase in the price of crude and refined pro- 
ducts, amounting to about 40 per cent in 1904 
over that of 1903. However, the question of 
prices cannot always be relief upon, as there are 
constant sales at less than the price quoted as 
current. 

The market was generally depressed through- 
out the year. One of the depressing effects dur- 
ing 1904 was the large increase in the produc- 
tion of crude petroleum in the United States and 
the decline in the price of export petroleum. The 
internal troubles in Russia and the increased de- 
mands by laborers has caused a general depres- 



sion in business, which has had its effect' in the 
petroleum district. Owing to the great demand 
for Russia petroleum for qiluid fuel, nearly 50 
per cent of the production is consumed for that 
purpose. 

The Grosni field, which has produced for sev- 
eral years, showed a considerable increase in 
production in 1904 over that of 1903. The new 
Bereki field, 170 miles north of Baku, mentioned 
last year, has developed a flo wof hot salt water, 
which has interefered with the wells discourag- 
ing. 

There are indications of the possibility of the 
island of Tcheleken becoming an important fac- 
tor in the petroleum world. Most of the pre- 
liminary work has been completed and there are 
already many reports of oil tsrikes in different 
parts of the island. Messrs. Nobel Brothers have 
started to erect four large iron tanks and the 
equipment of the electric central of this com- 
pany has been advanced so far that it will soon 
be completed. The company sent several wagon- 
loads of paraffin, prepared from Tcheleken oil 
to St. Petersburg, and the quality is considered 
excellent by consumers. 

During the past two years petroleum has been 
found in wells recently drilled in the western 



BE YOUR OWN PR0M0T0R 



We have just secured the control and sale 
of fourteen mining claims, adjoining in one 
group, at Bullfrog, Nevada. The claims 
lie close to and south and east of the Orig- 
inal Bullfrog and the Bullfrog Extension, 
two of the big mines that have installed 
hoisting machinery and are vigorously open- 
ing up enormous ledges of phenomenally 
high grade ore; and these fourteen claims 
lie next to and east of the Big Bullfrog, 
which has already opened up a big ledge of 
ore, and has installed a very complete plant 
of hoisting machine^'. 

The claims we offer are well located, as 
will be shown by the map that we will 
send on your request. In each of the four- 
teen claims of this group we are going to 
sell a three-fourths interest, retaining one- 
fourth interest ourselves. For each one- 



fourth interest sold a good and sufficient 
deed will be made to the purchaser. When 
these several interests are sold a company 
will be incorporated, and each buyer of a 
one-fourth interest in each claim will share 
equally in the promotion stock of the com- 
pany in proportion to the interest he holds. 
You can buy a one-fourth interest in half a 
dozen different claims if you prefer; or a 
three-fourths interest in any one claim, but 
we do not want to sell any one of the claims 
outright, preferring to keep them in one 
body. 

Here's a chance to get a great big block 
of stock in a company to be incorporated, 
for a small amount of money. The com- 
pany will be started free of debt and own- 
ing its property. Maps and further facts 
sent on request to prospective purchasers. 



DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

RIALTO BUILDING, A-IO 
SAN FRANCISCO, * * CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



portion of Turkestan, Central Asia, province of 
Terghana, district of Tehiraion. The quality is 
shown h\ analysis of Mr. Rojosine to he midway 

tween American and Russian crudes. The 
specific gravity is 87; equal to 31 deg. Baume. 

The island of Sakhalin on the southeastern 
border of Siberia immediately north of the Jap- 
anese island of Hokkaido or Ezo. Petroleum de- 
posits are reported in obth the southern and the 
northern portions of this island. According to 
the description of the mining engineer, L. Batzc- 
vitch, deputed to Sakhalin, the petroliferous area 
is situated on the northern extremity of the island 
on the eastern slope of the mountain range which 
traverses the middle of the island from north to 
south, and here are to be found outcrops of pe- 
troleum and deposits of asphalt. For determin- 
ing the character of the formations several shafts 
were sunk, and it was ascertained by their geo- 
logical age the formations belong to Miocene de- 
posits of the Tertiary system; and, as is the case 
in most oil fields, here also are to be noted anti- 
clinal folds in the strata. 

Analysis have been made which have proved 
that Sakhalin crude oil has a specific gravity at 
17.5 deg. C. of 0.899, and represents an oxida- 
tion of a lighter crude to be found at a greater 
depth. The specific gravity of the fractions re- 
mind one of Baku oil, and the fractions received 
up to 250 deg. C. represent a high class illumi- 
nating oil, of which a yield of about 30 per cent, 
can be obtained from the crude. 

The petroleum deposits in southern Sakhalin 
are situated among the hills covered with bogs on 
both banks of the river Niuta, and the petroli- 
ferous formation is covered on top with deposits 
of recent origin. The oil comes out on the sur- 
face in the valleys. It stretches along for a dis- 
tance of two miles, forming a continuous row 7 of 
large and small shining black patches, which 
stand out clearly among the surrounding verdue. 
The width of this belt is only several sagenes. 
It is presumed that the oil pools were formed in 
those places where the axis of the anticlinal run- 
ning from north to south has been washed away 
and the oil bearing formation appears on the sur- 
face. The deposits on the river Niuta have not 
been worked yet, but claims are already staked 
out, and Mr. Kleie, who has secured a conces- 
sion about 25 miles from the town of Niutovo, 
has already made arrangements with an English 
company for its development. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 




Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C. 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Gal. 



WM. WAI, LACE B. W. CHARLESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARLBSWORTH 

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Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




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OFFICE AND WORKS:— WARREN, OHIO 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Opportunities in Mining 



The magnificent future of the mining industry 
was nicely exemplified in an interview with a 
mining man recently, published in a western pa- 
per. The mining man in question was asked in 
what profession he would bring up a young man 
in order to insure hi mthe greatest future. The 
answer was as direct as it was iirm. The mining 
man had been a lawyer in the East in his younger 
days and had seen quite a little of the world and 
the possibilities for a young man just starting 
out in life. He had watched the course of the 
mining industry for years and stated that the 
future of the mining business was greater and 
offered greater opportunities for 5 r oung men, with 
the proper training, than did any other line of 
business in the country. This man was a failure 
as a lawyer. He did not lack ability, but he 
failed to get the proper start because the field 
was overcrowded. He realized the possibilities 
of the mining business. He in reality began his 
business career over again by learning everything 
in his 'power about mines, mills and smelters. 
To-day he is worth a fortune. He owns mining 
property that will no doubt greatly increase his 
wealth. His sons are attending mining schools. 
During vacation days these young men are em- 
ployed hitting the drill in the mines, supplement- 
ing their theoretical knowledge with practical 
work. They know that this knowledge will be 
worth much money to them in the future. They 
know that new mining camps are being found 
each year and that the day will come when they 
can go into a new camp, and with their knowl- 
edge of mines, secure grounds that may bring 
them a fortune. Of course this technical knowl- 
edge is not always required, as is shown by the 
thousands of men throughout the mining States 
who are independently rich, some of whom can- 



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FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
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Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



1! 



not even read. But the man who knows the 
mining business and can tell the difference be- 
tween country rock and a vein has a greater 
chance to succeed than the man who changes 
from a farmer to a prospector in a night. Dur- 
ing the past twenty years the production of 
precious metals has quadrupled. The prediction 
is made that even a greater increase will be scored 
during the coming period. 



The Standard Oil Company has declared a 
quarterly dividend of $10 a share. The previous 
dividend was $6 a share, and the dividend at this 
time last year was $7 a share. The above dec- 
laration brings the total dividend for the year 
to $40 a share. Last year it was $36. 



Recent Patents 



The following recently granted patents of in- 
terest to the oil and gas trade, are reported ex- 
pressly for the Pacific Oil Reporter by J. M. 
Nesbit, Patent Attorney, Park Building, Pitts- 
burg, Pa., from whom printed copies may be 
procured for 15 cents each: 

Oil well derrick, S. M. Foltz, Ramson, Ohio, 
801.372. 

Pumping jack, Forest Smeed, Bradner, Ohio, 
801,408. 

Oil-applying device, C. S. Young, Newton, 
Mass., 801,955. 

Metallic packing (2), John Badeker, Omaha, 
Neb., assignor to Badeker Metallic Packing Co., 
same place, 801,959 and 801,960. 

Packing expanding device, Fads Johnson, Bay- 
onne, N. J., and Wm. McDermott, Port Rich- 
mond, N. Y., 801,985. 

Well strainer, G. B. Kisner, Belmar, N. J., 
801,995. 

Oil well device, C. E. Down;., Mannington, 
W. Va., 802,182. 

Oil separator, J. N. Stumer, Buffalo, N. Y., 
802,243. 

Well drilling machinery, Mert McCain. 
Portland, Ind., 802,521. 

Well drilling machine, W. R. Martin, Bar- 
berton, Ohio, assignor to National Drill and 
Manufacturing Co., Chicago, 802,870. 

Oil well packer, T. W. Phillips, Jr., Butler, 
Pa., 802,880. 

Casing spear, John Stegner, Lewisville, Ohio, 
803,450. 

Apparatus for sinking wells, Dory Hickok, 
Gardena, and Charles Killefer, Los Angeles, 
Cal., 803,484. 



ORIGINAL MOUNTAIN 

He BULLFROG EXTENSION MINING COMPANY is on Original 
Mountain, which is the most active part of the camp of Bullfrog. The company 
has installed a very complete hoisting equipment. They have also started shaft 
No. 2, which has been vigorously pushed with a double shift of men and has 
been vigorously pushed with a double shift of men and has already opened up 
the rich green ore that has made the Original famous. This shaft is only a few 
feet from the side line of the Original Bullfrog. The BULLFROG EXTEN- 
SION has enormous ledges ranging from milling values to many thousand dollars 
per ton, as shown by assay of picked samples. World-famous engineers' reports 
will be sent on request, verifying the recent phenomenal strike of tellurium ore. 

A little stock left at 35 cents per share. A big advance November 25th. 
This same stock is now selling on the San Francisco Stock and Exchange Board 
at 37 to 41 cents, the first instance in the history of the Exchange where their 
price is higher than that of a company. 

Those who bought this stock in the summer can now sell it at an advance of 
100 per cent. We candidly believe that those who buy now at 35 cents can make 
a similar or a greater profit in the next few months. 

The company owns a great mine and it is paid for. They have big ledges of 
rich ore. We are confident that there is nothing better in Nevada in any com- 
pany at any price. This stock will make you money. 

Try it. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 



Rialto Building, A 10 



San Francisco, Cal. 



MANANA 

is the time many of you are going to advertise. Manana is Spanish for the time that never 
comes — to-morrow. 

New possibilities and opportunities for business development come only to those who act 
to-day. 

If a thing is worth doing at all it is worth doing now. The main thing is to make a 
start. To begin advertising to-day instead of to-morrow brings results one day nearer — or brings 
you one day nearer finding out if results are to be had. It identifies you one day earlier as one 
of the old advertisers who have built up a prosperous business by judicious advertising. To 
begin to-day gets you in touch with people who are going to buy, next week or next month, 
just the kind of a machine you sell. 

Change your advertising copy frequently. If you should see the same news printed in 
your morning paper day after day you would soon stop reading it and get another. Just the 
same with the man who reads your advertisement. If he sees the same ideas expressed each 
week you lose his attention. Change your copy frequently and the results of your advertising 
will increase. 

Call upon us for advertising rates and particulars, and do it to-day. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



W. K. OIL COMPANY. 

Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Coal- 
inga, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 12th day of October, 1905, 
.in assessment of two and one-half cents (2%c.) 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the 
W. K. Oil Company, payable immediately to J. 
W. Pauson, Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, Room 501 Parrott building. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
22d day of November, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 15th 
day of December, 1905, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. 

J. W. PAUSON, 

Secretary. 

San Francisco, Cal., October 17, 1905. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Pittsburg Oil Company 

Location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Location of works, Coalinga, 
Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Pittsburg Oil Company, held on the 23rd day of 
October, A. D. 1905, an assessment of four (4) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of this corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the company, at the office of the com- 
pany, rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Any stock upon which this 
assessment shall remain, unpaid on Saturday, De- 
cember 2, A. D. 1905, will be deiinquent and adver- 
tised for sale at public auction, and, unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, 
December 28th, A. D., 1905, at 11 A. M., to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. J. LAYMANCE, Secretary 

Office — Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the California 

Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, Nov. 15th: 

Associated bonds — 

2000 bonds at $92.00 

Associated stock — 

2280 shares at 56 

6781 shares at 57 

1000 shares at 58 

Arline — 

200 shares at 45 

Claremont — 

1300 shares at 1.00 

500 shares at 1 .02y 2 

800 shares at 1.05 

1000 shares at ....... 1.10 

Chicago Crude (New) — 

100 shares at 07 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchasa of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



STOC KS 

I handle Mines and Oil Lands and Act 
as Fiscal Agent fop Good Securities 

D. L. HEALY 

BROKER 

Member of San Francisco & 
Tonopah Mining Exchange 

534 MILLS BUILDING 
Telephone Main 5747 6an Francisco, Cal 



INVESTMENTS 



SAN JOSE CREMATION ASS'N. 

Now Incorporated. 

PRICES OF STOCK TODAY, PER SHARE $10. 

Prices December Next, $15; July, 1906, $20; 

December, 1906, $25, or Par. 

The Oakland Association has proven a great suc- 
cess, yielding in dividends last year 18 per cent to 
first investors. Prices advanced in three years 
from $10 to $27 per share. Equal or better results 
may be expected from the San Jose Cremation 
Association. 



Pays 7% per cent or $160 per share, two months' 
accrued interest. 

160 shares of Oakland Crematory Association at 
$27 per share. Has paid eight dividends since 
March, 1904, of 30c each. Dividends hereafter 
semi-annually, December and June. 



300 shares Columbian Oil Co., at 50c. Par value 
$1. Nineteen wells In operation. Dividends to be 
paid this fall. 



30,000 5 per cent bonds of the Turlock Irrigation 
District at par, denomination $400 each; issued 
1902, expire in 1942. 



Water front property at $55 per foot. 



125 shares of the Phoenix Savings Building and 
Loan Co. 



Business property under a lease paying 6 per 
cent on $50,000. Will sell for $36,000. 



FOR STOCK AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 

W. E. BARNARD, 

746 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

As a special inducement to new subscribers and to induce delinquent subscribers to "settle up" we 
will give as a premium to all new subscribers to the Pacific Oil Reporter, or to old subscribers who 
pay their subscription one year in advance, a copy of the Coalinga Map, printed on a fine quality bond 
paper, without extra charge. These maps sell for 50c. and are well worth the money. Subscribe 
for the Pacifie Oil Reporter and secure one free. 

SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

• ••• 190.. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Gentlemen: 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil Reporter for months, commencing 

with the issue. S inclosed herewith in payment thereof. 

NAMB 

Subscription Price 
OneYear, - - $2.50 ADDRESS :. 

Six Months, - - 1.S0 

Three" - - - 1.00 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



IS 



Four — 

3000 sharfs at 

Home — 

100 shares at 

Independence — 

500 shares at 

200 shares at 

1500 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

7100 shares at 

Monarch — 

500 shares at 15 

Oil City Petroleum — 

1700 shares at 75 

Twenty-Eight — 

100 shares at 8.00 

100 shares at 8.50 



.30 

.50 

.18 
.19 
20 

.75 



Following are the latest 
of oil companies listed on 
and Oil Exchange: 

Alma 

Arline 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . . 

California Standard 

Caribou 

Central Point Con 

Chicago Crude (New) .. 

Claremont 

Forty 

Four 

Giant 

Hanford 

Home 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kern 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va. 
Oil City Petroleum . 

Peerless 

Piedmont 

Reed Crude 

Senator 

Sovereign 

Sterling 

Superior 

Thirty-Three 

Toltec 

Twenty-Eight 

Union 

Wabash 

West Shore 

Wolverine 



quotations for stocks 
the California Stock 



Bid. 

.40 
.40 
.04 
.56 
.40 



. 1.75 
.07 

. 1.05 
.45 
.28 
.50 

,190.00 
.48 



13.00 
.17 



13.50 
.09 



.09 
.14 

.75 



. .70 
, 6.75 

.03 

.24 
. 1.60 

.20 
. 1.25 

.05 
. 5 . 00 
. .60 
. 7.50 
.150.00 

.30 
. 1.05 

.30 



Asked. 

.46 
.08 

.57 

7.50 



1.10. 
.50 
.30 



.50 
.20 
16.00 
.18 
.20 

.12 
10.00 

.12 
.17 
• 77i/o 
.04 
.75 
7.50 
.08 



.25 

2.00 

.06 



8.50 
162.00 

1.65 
1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Mala I65S 



MAPS 

The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to 810.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
tor Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX 237 -. 




WANTED 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

OH Well Tools 

OH Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

J Fishing Tools 



W. E. YOULB 



SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO. CAL. 



H. B. GUTHREY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 
^^==^^= in any country :z^=^^= 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which Is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, Coalinga, California 



14 PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RELIABILITY OUR MOTTO 



BARLOW & HILL 



The up-to-date Map Makers 



BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



15 



Private looms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317-319-321-323 

Piae St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST=CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MT'G. CO. 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



"7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 



Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 2791 g an Francisco 



4. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

41O, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Franelsct 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry the uargesl stock. Onr price! Ate 
Bq tillable. 

Tel. Main. 1188. 

PATENT S — Unlted States and 

■ Foreign. Trade 

Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, - 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 






drudqci 

into J 

pastime 





Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

are perfect in every respect. The sportsman is never 
disappointed in the working: of his gun if it's a STEV- 
EN'S — they ate safe, strong, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

We will send von ourvaluaMe 140-page book, tell- 
ing all about STEVENS anus, shutting, hunting;, 
notes "n the proper care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FSEE PUZZLE! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, on receipt of catalog price. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 

1'. 0. 110x4093. 
CHICOPEE EALLS, MASS., U.S.A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for thr pro- 
motion ot any legitimate ptoposi- 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing, Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, P&tttts or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon tram* The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 

of machine for oil and gas works. It . , „ .... „„„,. , .... 

mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests ran 9 e from S"a"°w water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON.OHIO 

Harron, Rickard & McCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



' ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 

Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 

Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZZZZZI CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers ssll it, because 
It is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCALE EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 



ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 



Phone James 7116 



California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Oil Chemists 

TESTS 

CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM 

Calorific Value, Fractional 
Distillation, Refining, Vis- 
cosity, Freezing, Asphel- 
tine, Sand and Water, Etc. 

Kerosene, Asphaltum, Boiler 
Feed and Drinking Water. 

Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
. and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 





»t4 







Vol. 7, No. 4« San Francisco, Cal., November 25 » 1905. Price lO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
• AN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

reid two cycle gas engine 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean? 
ing out, pumping, pulb 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jipply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, November 25, 1905 



Number 4 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER [F THE BEST POSTED oil man in . Cali 

fornia was to-da? .i^kol whal the production of 
Published Weekly. 

petroleum oil would amount to 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. . 

CR>IMi in I ''lb In' would say that lie 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. ..___, ,. ... , . TI . , , 

' Mil) OI duln t know. I» he was asked 

Mxria R. Winn. Proprietor. STATISTICS, as to the consumption or ship- 

E. S. Eastman. Editor and Manager. .. ments he would be still more 

at sea. In fact anj question that might be asked 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS | )jm rc l at | vc to t hc oil iniuStrj WOuld meet With 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California _ ^.^ display of ignorance that wmll(i 

Telephone, Bush 176. , 

shame a representative oil man ot any other part 

TERMS. of the United States. In the other principal oil 

One Year $2.50 producing States the oil man has arisen to the 

Six Months • s : tuat ; on anc j has been the means of having ade- 

1 hree Months » •UU 

Single Copies 10 quate laws enacted to compel producers, shippers, 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. an( J transportation companies to report the daily 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft statistics of their business. Organizations have 

or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil been effectC( , t0 still f urt her facilitate the com- 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 

31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied piling of intelligible reports covering every branch 

by writer's name and address, not necessarily for oj : t j, e :| business. The result is self apparent. 

publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. p rodu ^ shipper and consumer are each enabled 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- fQ wrn tneir business according to conditions. 

ifornia, as second-class matter. , T , 

- Prices are governed by supply and demand, it 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. ^ demand exceeds production prices go up, and vice 

Following are the latest quotations for Califot- ,,,,••• • j u 

k ,, ,v , L , versa. In California prices are governed by man- 

nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- . , , . , ,, t - •, 

. , , ioulation. If one ot the big handlers ot oil says 

nized buyers: ' 

COALINGA. that oil is worth only 15 cents per barrel, 15 

" rice cents goes. If the consumer gets it for a fifth of 

Oravitv per barrel. . 

22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 its value that is his good tortune-and the pro- 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22' i duccr's misfortune. The middleman makes about 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 the same profit. What is the trouble with Cali- 

KERN RIVER. fornia oil men 3 Are they asleep or only dream- 

14° gravity or better 18c j ng ? Are they willing to have their ultimate 

SANTA MARIA. destiny dictated to them or will they crawl out 

24 deg., up to but not including 2S 20 (:t t | lrjl . f QSS ;j s hell am | be up and doing something 

25 deg., or better - 22'/ a fQ rc | it . vc themselves from the present oppression 

eastern quotations. ^ and untim ely end? Will they be slaves to mo:>- 

,ona ,'".'" .', 8 opoly and autocracy or will they free themselves 

Pennsvlvama '■->" _ .., 

c j c j 138 from the bonds ot capital? Oil men ot California 

Corning 1.10 your destiny is in your own hands. Your grand- 
Newcastle 1-35 fathers would be ashamed of you and the mani.ev 

Cabell 1-18 ; n which you submit to the fancies of your un- 

North Lima l) 4 |; m ; tec | imagination. The bludgeon over your 

South Lima 1)cads .^ Qn , y ; mag j narv . vou are j n possession of 

Indiana it) ' . . . 

on the club — all vou have to do is to wield it. 

somerset SV 

Ragland 4 q Armies have won victories by organization : 

Corsicana, light 8*5 kings have been crowned and dethroned by or- 

Corsicana, heavy 50 ganization; our Presidents have been elected by 

Canada 1.34 organization : the unsurpassed labor conditions of 

Kansas Fuel Oil 55 ^ count we „ broug h t a b ou t solely by organ- 

30 to 301., gravity +0 . 

30'.. to 51 gravity " 43 izatton; your own lamentable condition has been 

31 to 31 ' 3 gravity 46 brought about bv organization — will vou continue 

31% to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 to allow organization to rule you or will you dic- 



tate your future bj organization. Oil men of 

California, you can go down to the depths of fail- 
ure and bankruptcy and rot in your well worn 
ruts of humdrum existence and no one will pity 
you unless you organize to help yourselves. An 
iron-clad organization of oil men in this State 
would bring oil to the dollar mark in sSt months. 
Will you have the dollar oil or will you have 
fifteen-cent oil? 



FROM TIMES IMMEMORIAL the popu- 
lation of this country has been largely composed 
of a class of people who eagerly 
THE catch at any scheme that prom- 

MINING ises "something for nothing." 

FAKER. It is through the knowledge 

of the existence of just such a 
credulous public that the stock jobber and faker 
is now enabled to thrive and prosecute his dis- 
reputable and dishonest occupation. Aided by 
the numerous questionable publications of the day 
and the comparatively free use of the United 
States mails He is enabled to flood the country 
with "get rich quick" schemes in oil and mining. 
From the advertisement of a novelty house, offer- 
ing a conglomeration of trash with a rolled gold 
ring "all for ten cents," to one of the "skin-'em- 
quick" oil company offering ten thousand shares 
at two cents per share, the general public grasp 
with an eagerness that only the laws of a State 
or nation can expect to cope with. One would 
naturally suppose that, after a person of ordinary 
intelligence had bitten the hook half a dozen times 
with unpleasant results, the experience would 
have a tendency to influence prudence, but this 
class of humanity fails to show the development 
of that sense of caution so strongly manifested by 
the "finny tribes," which fact, together with the 
"sucker every minute" theory, enables the faker 
of mining stocks to "ply his trade" successfully. 
The biggest liar heads the class of his so-called 
profession. We recently knew a man who had 
purchased stock in as many as seventeen corpora- 
tions, whose credited holdings were not, in any 
instance, within thirty miles of any piece of re- 
cognized oil property in the State. The party 
admitted that he bought the stock wholly on the 
strength of so many prospectuses and because it 
was "cheap.". The sucker well deserves to lose 
everj cent invested — and he surely will — but he 
has placed himself in the position of an imbecile 
or lunatic who is in sore need of a guardian to 
look after his financial affairs. If the above 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



losses and evil attributed thereto were confined 
alone to the fool investor we might let the mat- 
ter pass on the P. T. Barnum theory that the 
public is fond of being swindled, but, unfortun- 
ately, the blow falls upon the industry so grossly 
misrepresented. For this reason, and this reason 
alone, has California — followed by many other 
mining States — taken up the matter of legislation 
that is aimed to protect the chiefest industry of 
our country. Prof. Aubury's address, delivered 
at the mining convention last week( which we 
print on another page of this issue) will give the 



reader a fair insight into what may be expected 
along these lines in the future. The reputable 
oil and mining journals of the State are co-oper- 
ating with the State Mining Bureau in an at- 
tempt to stamp the illegitimate mining flotations 
from the coast. Although in effect less than a 
year the law referred to has worked wonders and 
the stock jobber, once so predominating here, is 
seeking cover with an eagerness that promises his 
early extinction. And woe be unto those who are 
caught napping. 



The Prevention of Mining Fraud by 
State Legislation 

By Lewis E. Aubury, 
State Mineralogist of California. 

Mr. President and Members of the American juries done by them are incalculable. The pos- 

Mining Congress: sibility of huge returns from small investments 

Now that mining in general is causing more appeals strongly to the average person with little 



attention to be drawn towards it than probably 
any other industry, in my opinion a necessity has 
arisen for the enactment of stringent laws which 
will protect the investor in mining properties. 
Protective laws should have been passed a gen- 



or no knowledge of mining conditions, and it 
often becomes an easy matter for the faker with 
his flowery prospectus to secure capital from gul- 
lible persons. 

But few recognize the great injury to mining 



eration ago, and had they been, mining would not investments which has been accomplished in this 

now be suffering to the extent that it is from country by the fake promoter. We can see the 

the acts of unscrupulous promoters. While fully result in the millions of dollars of capital which 

recognizing the efforts of the Government are at present passing us and seeking investment 



through the postoffice authorities in endeavoring 
to suppress the "wild cat" promoter, the "fake" 
operators are so numerous in the United States 
that there is a necessity for prompt legislation 
in the mining states which will end the opera- 
tions of these individuals. The task of sup- 



in our Sister Republic, Mexico; in South Ameri- 
can countries, and in British possessions. I 
would not wish to create the impression that all 
of the capital seeking investments elsewhere is 
caused by the fact that the foreigner has beer, 
"bitten" so often in this country that he is seek- 



pressing the illegitimate operator is such a stu- ,n S otr >er fields, but I do claim that a large pro- 

pendous one, that while the Postal Department Portion of this capital would be invested in this 

is using the best means at its command to prose- C0un t:O' had not so many illegitimate mining 

cute persons for the fraudulent use of the mails, schemes been foisted upon the public in the past, 

strong efforts should be made to either extend Not until confidence has been re-established in 

the necessary aid to that department, or to enact our mines by the passage of such laws as have 

such State laws as will provide for the prosecu- been suggested, so that the investor can feel that 

tion of the fraudulent promoter, where glaring he will be protected, do I look for the tide to 

misrepresentations are made by him. You are turn our way and not seek other channels. Now, 

probably all familiar with the style of pros- l e t us rid ourselves of these leeches, and the 

pectus with which this class of promoters flood sooner the better, and when this has been ac- 

the public at times, and of the losses sustained complished, mining will have been placed on a 

by credulous persons who have been induced to higher standard, and the legitimate promoter will 

purchase stock through reading this glowing lit- have some chance of enlisting capital to aid him 

erature. Probably no other business is so af- m developing his mining property. As it is, the 

flicted with parasites as in mining, and the in- investor with no knowledge of mining is not 

~ ™" "" ■" """ — "" ™ — ■" ~ - ^ — — — generally able to distinguish the good from the 

Note.— This paper was read at the session of bad, and it is useless to tell him of the necessity 

the American Mining Congress held in El Pas.., for securing expert opinion before investing. He 

Texas, November 14-18, 1905. listens to the tale of the wily faker, who speaks 



of guaranteed dividends, fabulous assays, etc., 
etc., and obtains expert advice after he has in- 
vested, and when the promises made him fail to 
materialize; when he realizes that he has been 
handed a "gold brick" with brass trimmings, he 
forever abjure:, mining and mining operators, 
and loses no opportunity to condemn the same. 
If, on the other hand, he had made a profitable 
investment in a legitimate proposition, there is 
a strong probability that his capital could again 
be enlisted in mining, and the industry would 
have gained a friend instead of an enemy. 

At the last session of the California Legisla- 
ture, I had the honor of presenting a bill, and 
which became a law, which aimed to put a stop 
to fraudulent practices. The law reads as fol- 
lows: 

"Section 1. Any superintendent, director, sec- 
retary, manager, agent, or other officer, of any 
corporation formed or existing under the laws 
■ if this State, or transacting business in the same, 
and any person pretending or holding himself out 
as such superintendent, director, secretary, man- 
ager, agent, or other officer, who shall wilfully 
subscribe, sign, endorse, verify, or otherwise as- 
sent to the publication, either generally or pri- 
vately, to the stockholders or other person; deal- 
ing with such corporation or its stock, any untrue 
or wilfully and fraudulently exaggerated report, 
prospectus, account, statement of operations, 
values, business, profits, expenditures or pros- 
pects, or other paper or document intended to 
produce or give, or having a tendency to produce 
or give, to the shares of stock in such corporation 
a greater value or less apparent or market value 
than they really possess, or with the intention of 
defrauding any particular person or persons, or 
the public, or persons generally, shall be deemed 
guilty of a felony, and on conviction thereof, 
shall be punished by imprisonment in State prison, 
or a county jail not exceeding two years, or by 
fine not exceeding five thousand dollars, or by 
both. 

"Sec. 2. All acts and parts of acts in con- 
flict with this act are hereby repealed." 

A\ hile it is yet too soon to report as to the full 
benefits of this law, I will say that up to the 
time of its enactment, California was flooded 
with mining prospectuses, many of them contain- 
ing the most glaring misrepresentations, and 
some of the daily press printed columns of mining 
advertisements, the inconsistency of which was 
very apparent. Since the passage cf the bill, 
with but few exceptions, the fraudulent and ex- 
aggerated prospectus has disappeared from Cali- 
fornia, and the faker has gone to other fields. 
Now that he may have invaded your State, keep 
him moving by enacting such laws a. will pro- 
hibit him from doing business aiming you. 1 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



;>ren informed thai the Si 
tun h; i the example set b) 

and enacted a similar law. While thi I 
law ma; not be fully in accordance with your 
secure one dealing with the subject, ami 
have tlie penalty sufficiently heavj SO as to deter 
the take operators from working in your State. 

In suggesting such State legislation, I i 
after a full consideration of its practical utilitv, 
ami the benefits which will accrue to the mining 
industry throughout the countrj therefrom. As 
the object of such laws should not permit of de- 
feat, it i> not anticipated that any amount of 



j ; «i . I that it is in possible to 
to protect gullible persons from 
purchasing "gold bricks," wild cat mining 
or any other plated investment, While I am 
willing to admit a large number of 
ist who need thi oi guardians, yet I be- 

lieve that it is due to the mining industry of the 
I nited States that we use every means in our 
power to place legitimate mining on the hi 
plane possible, and while we may have been 
dilatory in passing needed laws which would pro- 
tect the investor, let us make a beginning now. 
There is no time like the present. Let mining 



Johnnie Mining District 




Flowing Wells hos. 1 and 2 of the California Diamond Oil Co., 
Sunset District. 



opposition would be encountered in their enact- 
ment. 

It is occasionally found that in some mining 
communities whiclv temporarily profit from the 
operation of fake concerns in their midst, that 
an attempt is made to uphold them, but such 
attempts invariably react upon the community or 
district where support is given to the faker. As a 
general rule, however, most mining communi- 
ties frown upon the methods of the faker, and 
would welcome any restraining laws which would 
prevent him from operating among them. 

It is possible that my suggestions regarding the 
enactment of State laws which will restrain 01 
obliterate the mining faker, may meet with some 



be freed from the barnacles which have attached 
to it, and let us rid ourselves of a class who 
are not miners, and never will be, but will con- 
tinue to prej upon the industry unless some means 
are adopted to annihilate them. 

In this paper, I have suggested State Legisla- 
tion, and it may be asked, why not federal legis- 
lation? To this I will say that the latter would 
he most desirable, but there are difficulties in the 
way, and that it might take years to accomplish 
the object sought. Let us try State legislation 
first, as that can undoubtedly be secured imme- 
diately. National legislation we can look for in 
the future. 



K 

The Congress Mining Company, of which 
"Jim" Butler is president, has installed a camp 
with John Ross in charge as superintendent. Tin-. 
property was formerly known as the ( 'In spa 
mine and is developed to the 200-foot level. 
Some 11! the old working shafts will be utilized 
bj the new company. Some very rich ore bodies 
were opened up under the old management, but 
the company went to pieces as the result of a 
fatal shooting affray, which grew out of dis- 
honesty on the part of some of the partners. Mr. 
Ross, the new superintendent, was employed in 
the mine under the former regime and is thor- 
oughly familiar with the property. 

Col. Jackson, an old-time Nevada mine super- 
intendent, but now a resident of Los Angeles, 
paid the camp a visit recently. It was his first 
visit to the district and he expressed himself in 
very strong language "endorsing the future of the 
camp. . 

Robert Hays Smith and O. J. Myers, two well 
known oil men of the Coalinga field, were recent 
visitors to Johnnie. Both gentlemen are negotiat- 
ing for properties with a view to forming com- 
panies. 

James Stirling, a noted mining engineer, recent- 
ly from Australia, has just completed a very ex- 
haustive report on the Johnnie mine. About one 
month's time was spent in exploring the mine and 
the surrounding territory. The report is very 
elaborate in its detail and will be profusely illus- 
trated with halftones and pen sketches. It is the 
first report of the kind dealing with the geology 
and petrology of the district and will doubtless 
serve to stimulate new interest in the Johnnie 
camp, as well as serve a useful purpose in dis- 
seminating information about a section which has 
been hitherto overlooked. 

Concluding a very exhaustive report on the 
Johnnie Mine Mr. Stirling says: 

"The geological features of the district imme- 
diately surrounding the Johnnie Consolidated 
mining area, and the result of the mining opera- 
tions already carried on at the lower levels of 
the Johnnie mine, justify the belief in the down- 
ward continuity of the payable ore bodies, and 
that the locality is one which offers very favor- 
able conditions for successful mining enterprises. 
The indications of the formation of the metallic 
auriferous contents of the lodes by ascending so- 
lutions, along lines of fissure produced by great 
earth movements which may extend to profound 
depths, indicates a condition of permanency 
which augurs well for the future of deep mil 
* * * The ore chutes of the Johnnie mine 



rACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



..e been sufficiently developed to prove their 
richness and downward continuity to the 600- 
foot levels, with every probability of further con- 
tinuance as greater depths are reached." 

The Johnnie district is being extended toward 
the south by recent discoveries. About three 
miles south of the town Charlie Lamphear made 
a very important discovery recently -of a vein of 
malachite ore which assayed eleven per cent cop- 
per and $8 in gold. He also located two gold 
claims adjoining on the west of the copper loca- 
tion which showed a strong ledge of ore assaying 
better than $10 to the ton on the surface. To 
the west of the Lamphear locations a few miles 
other prospectors have recently made discoveries 
which indicate that the mineralized zone of the 
Johnnie district extends in a southwestern direc- 
tion for -at least five miles from the town of 
Johnnie. This section is being closely prospected 
by some of the best experienced prospectors from 
other camps and we shall not be surprised to 
hear of some further discoveries being made 
within the next month or two. 



E. C. Tilsley of Santa Monica, Cal., is organiz- 
ing an automobile service to connect Johnnie 
with the Santa Fe railroad at Ivanpah and the 
Salt Lake road at Leastalk. The White auto- 
mobile will be used, as it has been demonstrated 
that the steam machine is preferable to the gaso- 
line machine on the desert. Mr. Tilsley says 
he will make the run from Leastalk to Johnnie 
in eight hours, crossing the mountains at State 
Line Pass. This line ought to receive a good 
patronage and doubtless will after the service 
becomes known. At present the travel into the 
district is by the stage line running from Good 
Springs Siding on the Salt Lake road to Manse, 
22 miles south of Johnnie, and from thence by 
private conveyance. From the north passengers 
leave the Bullfrog and Las Vegas stage line at 
Miller's Well, 12 miles north of Johnnie. Good 
Springs is 74 miles and Ivanpah 94 miles from 
Johnnie. Leastalk is the junction point of the 
Salt Lake and Santa Fe roads about 10 miles 
south of Ivanpah, Cal. 



Mews from the Field 



SANTA MARIA. 



Special Correspondence. 

Santa Maria, Nov. 22., 1905. 

THE WESTERN UNION OIL CO. 

This property on the Careaga ranch, contain- 
ing several thousand acres of land, is in the 
southern anticline of the Santa Maria oil fields. 
This company was organized in Los Angeles and 
is the pioneer in the field. As early as 1899 A. 
H. McKay, the promoter and former of the 
company, engaged Mr. Mulholland of Los An- 
geles to explore the field, and upon the strength 
of his very favorable report the company felt it- 
self justified in proving the territory. This was 
done at a considerable expense, as it was not till 
a third well was bored and completed in Aug- 
ust, 1901, that the territory was proven, and the 
first of a series of subsequent gushing wells was 
discovered. The Western Union Oil Co. deserves 
special credit for the persistency with which, un- 
der difficulties and heavy expenses, it explored a 
new field, upwards of $100,000 being expended 
before any paying oil was found. Subsequently 
about twenty wells were drilled, several of them 
were strong gushers, but when the gas subsided 
they were found to be relatively small producers, 
i. e., 40 to 50-barrel wells. They were bored 
to from 1500 to 1700 foot levels, set to a com- 
mon jack and the oil of 21 to 22 degrees gravity 
pumped over a pipe line to the ocean at Gaviota 
Landing. Some of the oil for local purposes was 
pumped to Careaga, a station on the narrow 



gauge, whence it was distributed in cars for local 
use along the line. 

More wells were still put down, and about two 
years ago the experiment of deepening the wells 
was begun. This led to the most valuable de- 
velopment for the field. In fact, we believe it is 
to the credit of the La Graciosa Oil Company, 
adjoining property, that the first deep well is to 
be credited to, they having failed to find oil in 
any appreciable quantity in the upper levels. Go- 
ing down to the 3100-foot level the La Gracoisa 
Company suddenly developed a flowing well of 
400-barrel capacity. 

Then the Western Union began to deepen 
some of their shallow wells, and all subsequent 
wells were dug at once to the lower strata, 3200 
to 3600 feet. Their latest wells, numbered 26, 
27 and 28, are wonderful producers. Mr. E. E. 
Henderson, their local superintendent, last year 
developed a 3500-foot well which flowed nearly 
1000 barrels a day when uncapped. By going 
along the northwest corner where the anticline 
is apparently at its nearest, Mr. A. Cole, the 
present superintendent, has even developed 1600- 
barrel-a-day wells. Just think of it, a single 
well flowing without the least pumping, 75,000 
gallons of high grade oil daily! And these wells 
diminish but slowly even when gushing. They 
are of 25 to 27 degree gravity at these lowest 
levels, and contain considerable distillates, gaso- 
line and coal oil ingredients. To be told that 
wells flow out way beyond 1000 barrels daily 



seems almost increditable, but such is the case, 
and it can be readily substantiated. 

The Western Union now delivers in the neigh- 
borhood of 100,000 barrels a month, mostly to 
the Standard Oil Company under recent con- 
tracts, and the full capacity of the wells is not at 
all utilized. 

The formation drills easy in four and one-half 
to five months some of these deepest wells are 
finished up. The cotnpa^-v is now paying regular 
dividends to its stockholders. It is a Los An- 
geles incorporation of which John D. Hooker is 
president and manager; J. D. Bicknell, vice- 
president ; Morris Alber, secretary, and A. Cole, 
superintendent. 

From the Santa Maria fields, Port Harford is 
receiving for shipment 15,000 barrels of oil daily. 
Half of it flows from the Standard Oil Com- 
pany's pipe line, the rest from the Union Oil 
Company's pipe and the narrow gauge trains of 
the Union's tankage. Besides this the Brookshire 
Company has its pipe line running to Bettevavia, 
the spur of the Southern Pacific, and the Gra- 
ciosa Oil Company has a pipe line to Casmalia 
Station. 

From Port Harford vessels or steamers take 
the oil direct to San Francisco, to Honolulu and 
even to Atlantic points by way of the Horn. 

This is about the anniversary of that remark- 
able gusher of the Union Oil Company. It is 
now. twelve months since that famous Hartnell 
gusher commenced flowing night and day without 
exhausting itself. It is said to have yielded over 
1,500,000 barrels of oil during the time. Last 
Friday on the Folosm lease of the Union Com- 
pany another gusher was encountered, but it was 
soon placed under control and capped. This will 
• prove another fine territory and joins the Pinal. 
J. F. Goodwin, the superintendent of the Pinal, 
and some other local men are about to develop an 
adjacent piece of oil land in the heart of the 
proven oil territory. They are naming it the 
Pine Land Oil Company. It is presumed they 
will put some stock on the market. 

The narrow gauge has recently added another 
daily oil train from Orcutt to Port Harford. 

The Graciosa Oil Company is bringing suit 
against the county tax collector (having paid its 
taxes under protest) enjoining him from taxing 
oil and oil property. This is an important suit 
and of far reaching interest to all oil men all over 
the coast. The question raised being that the 
land is already taxed and that its products shouI3 
not be further taxed. It may take some while be- 
fore the question is decided, for if the case is 
even lost in the Superior Court it will undoubt- 
edly be carried to the Supreme Court. 

L. E. B. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



7 



KERN COUNTY. 



lal Correspondence. 

Bakbksfuld, Cal. V. 23 
W ork mi the Southern 1' pe line be- 

tween this field and Delano is being rushed as 
much as possible. It is not known him soon it 
will be completed, hut the completion and test 
will he watched with much interest In ever) one 
interested in the transportation of crude nil. It 



i ho had expressed !. i this 

:ig all that has been > lain 
like Mini that the line would da .ill and more than 
had been stated it would. No one knows whether 
tlu\ -mall wager was placed or not. hut if the 
rumor is true the officials of the railroad certainl) 
have faith in the new method of transporting o 1. 
The line will he .?2 miles in length, uith hut 
the one pumping station, which will he placed 




" Hartnell Gusher" of the Union Oil Co., Santa Maria, now about one year old. This well has 
alone produced over 1,500,000 barrels of oil. 



is reported that the inventor of the process tor at the field end of the line. The Standard has 

corrugating the pipe will receive a bonus of $50,- stations every 14 miles on its line from its tanks 

000 in case the line is a success and does what he to Point Richmond, and has never been able to 

claims for it. Another idea of the faith the of- force through more than 10,000 to 12,000 barrels 

finals have in the success of this line is a report of the heavy Kern River oil even under the most 

current among the oil men that a prominent of- favorable circumstances. The Southern Pacific 

ficial and stockholder of the Southern Pacific line, it is claimed, will handle 20,000 barrels 

offered to wager an official of the Standard Oil dailj b) mixing with water. The inventor of 



I iti d m -t iiii , laims tli 
will not mix, even under the great pre 

created In the pumps, hut w 1! come OUl the 

other end separate. The Standard had b 

by Dlixin W ith water, hut the 

great trouble and expense necessarj to separate 

the two caused the abandonment of this scheme. 

If an eight-inch line with stations .ill miles 
apart is able to handle Jii.ddii barrels of oil daily, 
the problem of transportation for Kern River oil 
will be solved. The operators of this held will 
then be able to either build a line themselves or 
interest the capital necessar) to do so. 

With a pipe line either to San Francisco or the 
coast, they will be able to get their oil to market 
at a cost of only a few cents per barrel, as com- 
pared with the present rate of over 40 cent.. 
With a line of their own the producers will he 
free from the present combination of interests 
and be able to enter the markets in competition 
with any of the larger companies. 

There is no question but that the large mar- 
keters of oil find it cheaper to buy oil from tiie 
s nailer producers at 15 cents than to produce it 
themselves; otherwise they would drill up some 
of their own extensive territory as yet untouched 
b, the drill. 

Some of the companies can produce oil at 15 
ci nts and make a small profit, but there is quite 
a difference between the management of proper- 
tii i where the owners are closely looking out for 
(heir own interests, considering the cost of oper- 
ating a lease with profit to themselves and their 
stockholders, and the management of operating 
active drilling as handled by the larger com- 
panies. 

The idea is growing rapidly among the owners 
and operators, not only of this field, but other 
fields in the State, that some sort of an associa- 
tion or organization must be formed that will 
include every individual operator and producer. 
What form this association, if formed at all, will 
t ike, does not seem to be clear as yet. Whether 
it will take into consideration the marketing of 
oil by the producer or not, or to simply have all 
the information and data connected with the oil 
business, of consumption, demand, amount of oil 
produced by each field, its probable life ami ca- 
pacity, and to lay plans for the future in accord- 
ance with the supply of oil in sight, and demand 
for j ears to come. 

The large handlers of oil are of use to the 
producers only as a means of marketing their oil, 
and whatever profit has been made, and is being 
made, is at the expense of the other producers 
of the State. But by some means they have suc- 
ceeded in controlling transportation until the 
small operator who has opportunity to make 
profitable contracts, has to let them gi 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



simply because he cannot guarantee delivery. 

Information has reached here that a movement 
is on foot among the operators of the Coalinga 
district to organize a general shutdown of the 
field and thereby force the large companies in 
charge of the marketing of Coalinga oil to give 
the producer a fair price for his oil or to do with- 
out it. 

It is generally understood that the entire pro- 
duction of Coalinga oil is being marketed as fast 
as the transportation companies are able to get 
it to the consumer, and that not a barrel of the 
25,000 barrels daily production is going into 
storage. In view of these conditions it will be 
an easy matter for producers of that district to 
force the price up enough to allow them a living 
profit on their investement. 

All the oil from the Kern River field is being 
cared for as fast as produced. 

In a future article the amount of oil produced, 
shipments, oil in storage, etc., etc., will be given, 
so that the public can figure out for themselves 
what has become of the Kern River production of 
1905. 

SUNSET-MIDWAY. 

The press has given publicity to the statement 
that the Southern Pacific will join with the Santa 
Fe in extending the road from Sunset to McKitt- 
rick. 

The Sunset oil field is beginning to attract 
new attention. The extension of the Santa Fe 
branch into Midway is promised as soon as a 
construction crew finish work in other places. 
Material for the new line is already on the 
ground. An understanding has been affected 
between the Santa Fe and the Southern Pacific 
whereby the grade for the branch will be made 
to conform with the Southern Pacific track at 
McKittrick, thus promising a loop connecting 
the whole west side. A train of Southern Pacific 
officials were in Sunset last week, and a body of 
their geologist:, and surveyors are investigating 
Sunset and Cuvama country. 

Mr. J. C. Sperry is putting in a stronger rig 
on the Elkhorn and will rush work as rapidly as 
possible. Mr. Swartz is running a prospecting 
string in the Cuvama country for the Union 
Oil Co. 

The California Diamond Oil Co. has recently 
purchased the property of the Obispo Oil Co. 
The company has two of the best wells in the 
field and that is saying a good deal. These wells 
have never been perforated, but have flowed al- 
most constantly since being drilled in. 

The Jewett and Blodget refinery is running 



full blast and has orders ahead for the entire out- 
put. 

The Transport Oil Co. is bringing in a fine 
well. 

The Adaline wells are still flowing as much as 
ever. That Sunset is to be one of the most per- 
manent fields of the State is generally conceded 
by all oil men. 

No word has been received from the Webbfoot 
Syndicate, who recently put in another string of 
drive pipe and commenced operations again on 
their well in the hills back of Sunset. Oil, if 
found in this locality at all, is generally supposed 
will be of a much lighter gravity than the fuel 
oil, and therefore would not come into very much 
competition with Kern River, McKittrick and 
Sunset producers, whose oil is more valuable for 
fuel purposes than that of refining. C. W. 



be started in a few days. Well No. 2 is clear- 
ing up, having worked off a lot of sand. We are 
informed that the management will continue 
drilling its territory until fully developed, as the 
results are very encouraging. 

California Monarch Oil Company's well No. 
1 is progressing very satisfactorily. Well No. 4 
is 1400 feet deep and will be finished at 1450 
feet ; well No. 1 1 is flowing very nicely and im- 
proving. It is doing better than 100 barrels per 
day. Well No. 12 is 1500 feet deep and will 
shut off the water at this point. Well No. 13 
(Sec. 26) is going nicely at 1950 feet. 



MINING NOTES. 



COALINGA. 



Special Correspondence. 

Coalinga, Cal., Nov. 23. 1905. 
The Missouri Coalinga Co., who have been 
deepening their well for the purpose of getting a 
higher grade of oil, have gotten into the lighter 
strata at 1875 feet which promises to make this 
a flowing well, producing probably 800 barrels 
a day. 

The Union Oil Co. spudded in the early part 
of this week on their No. 7 well. 

Mr. W. A. Gray of the Home Oil Co. re- 
turned Tuesday from a trip to Los Angeles. 

Well No. 4 of the Stockholders' Oil Co. is 
1100 feet deep and drilling ahead. 

The New San Francisco Crude Oil Co. are 
building the rig for well No. 5. 

Mr. T. A. O'Donnell of the Union Oil Co. 
was a visitor to Fresno this week. 

Last Monday night a severe wind storm de- 
stroyed a number of derricks in the field. Among 
the companies who suffered loss are the El Zuno 
Puro, York Coalinga, Maine State, Genesee, 
Murdock, Home, Commercial Petroleum, Inde- 
pendence, Stockholders. Several companies were 
unfortunate enough to lose more than one der- 
rick. 

The W. K. Oil Co. are building the rig for 
their well, No. 2. A. E. S. 

California and New York Oil Co.'s Consolid- 
ated has completed its water well, having secured 
a fine body of water. The work on No. 3 will 



The Empire Gold Mines, Limited, is showing 
up a fine grade of ore in the east and west drift 
on the 500 and proves to be of good value. Sink- 
ing in the shaft continues and the ore is improv- 
ing in value. The chlorination plant is in oper- 
ation night and day treatig about five tons of 
sulphurets every twenty-four hours. 

Work continues at the Murchie Gold Mines, 
Consolidated, uninterruptedly. The latest de- 
velopment has brought a very high grade of free 
milling ore, which is also very rich in sulphurets. 



Foreign Production of Pe- 
troleum in 1904 



II. 

Austria-Hungary. — The production of pe- 
troleum in Galicia in 1904 was 827,117 tons, or 
5,947,383 barrels, as compared with 5,234,475 
barrels in 1903, a gain of 712,908 barrels. The 
remarkable production of the deep wells near 
Boryslaw has furnished a large percentage of 
Galicia's increased production, which has more 
than doubled in the last four years. 

Boryslaw has long been noted for the produc- 
tion of ozocerite of natural paraffin, which is 
mined by shafts. There were previously a num- 
ber of w-ells producing petroleum in the vicinity, 
but their capacity was small. During 1902 a test 
well was drilled to over 900 meters, which be- 
gan spouting at the rate of 3,000 barrels per day. 
A rapid development soon followed, and numer- 
ous large producers at the increased depth were 
secured. 

During the latter portion of 1904 there was 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ri in the production of tlii< 
held. which u.i* more tlian made Rood bj the 
r\ of the new pool near by, cillcil Tus- 
tanowice, three miles distant, which lie also deep 
«ell> anil shm\ quantities similar to the original 
wells in the Bofyslau pool. Nearly all of these 

wells How naturally. 

< >ne new pool was opened up in l'HI4, known 

as the Bozi field, not tar from Rowne. The first 

well in this field tapped the producing sand at 

neters in October. 1902, and at the close of 

I»II4 has produced about 10,000 tons. No. 2 well 

was drilled in October, 1903, and bj the dose of 
1904 had produced 10,660 tons: well No. 3 was 
struck in April. l')|)4, and by the close of the year 
had produced o42^ tons; well No. 4 was a lar^e 
producer, and struck the pay in June, 1904, at 
922 meters, and began to produce at a remark- 
able rate. This well at the close of the year 
had placed 29,527 tons, or 175,000 barrels, in 
tanks to its credit, the outlook for 1905 being very 
promising for this new field, as there were 46 
drilling wells at the close of 1904. 

There were a total of 294 wells drilled and 
drilling in Galicia in 1904, and 47 wells were 
abandoned, most of them permanently, making 
.HI operations. The average depth was about 
800 meters. Thirty-three wells were drilled to 
more than 10(10 meters, two to over 1100 meters 
and one deep well was drilled over 1200 meters. 
Nearly all the wells are drilled in Galicia by the 
Canadian rod method. A few used the water 
flush system, and one drilled by the Wolski hy- 
draulic boring ram. The additional cost of the 
latter system does not compensate for the time 
saved over the Canadian system. The production 
of the wells varies greatly with their age and 
the general character of the field. The largest 
productive well in 1904 was in the old district of 
Potok, which produced nearly 46,000 tons during 
the year. 

The stocks of petroleum at the beginning of 
1904 were 202,816 tons, to which there were 
added 222.251 tons during the year, making 
425,067 tons, about 2,600,000 barrels, on hand 
at the close of 1904, an increase of 109 per cent. 
Of this total 40 per cent is held in tanks at 
Boryslaw. , 

The Petrolea Company was recently organized 
to erect tanks and store petroleum, and now 
owns 37 iron tanks, with a capacity of 157 250 
tons. There are also numerous tanks erected at 
many of the producing fields and at railway ship- 
ping points. Two new pipe lines were built from 
the new field at Tustanowice to the railway at 
Boryslaw and another from Wielpole to Zagorz 
during the year. 

The average price per metric centner in 1904 
was 2.55 florins, as compared with 2.82 florins 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C. 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, CaJ. 




WM. WAt, LACE 



B. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 



WALLACE & CHARLBSWORTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, fl ft II Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, r fLl K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I Vl U PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 




WMll 




F- AN V4C AJ3AC4-T-Y 



Warren cnxBoiLErf 



*» ■■■■■■■ 

Warren 



j&stfte '■■■*"*'&'*'£?. 



\rVA 



-9HIO. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



per metric centner in 1903, a decrease of about 
10 per cent. , 

During 1904 no less than 328,000 tons of re- 
fined oil resulted from the operations at the re- 
fineries, as against 294,000 tons in 1903, and 272,- 
000 tons in the preceding year. This increase has 
naturally been disposed of in the export trade, for, 
as is well known, the home demand for kerosene 
cannot be extended to any material extent. In 
the export trade the figures for the past year, 
when compared with those of 1903, show an in- 
crease of about 80 per cent. Today the total 
number of refineries in operation is 90, of which 
54 are situated in Galicia and the rest in other 
parts of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy. There- 
fore the quantity of oil refined by many of the 
Galician refineries is comparatively small. 

Roumania. — Roumania for the past three or 
four years has made great strides in the develop- 
ment of her petroleum resources. In four years 
ending with 1904 it has doubled it; production. 
The production of crude petroleum in 1904 was 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Arline Oil Company, a corporation ; principal 
place of business San Francisco; location of prop- 
erty, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 18th day of November, 
1905, an assessment of two cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 501 Parrott 
Building. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 28th day of Decem- 
ber, 1905, will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and, unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on the 20th day of 
January, 1906, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

J. W. Pauson, Secretary 

Levied Nov. 18, 1905. 

Delinquent Dec. 28, 1905. 



Sale January 20, 1906. 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tight and Slack Work. 



OUR SPECIAL-TIES ARE 



WhiteSpruceSaves and Heading 
all ready to set up for Fish, 
Pickles or Lard packages of 
any size. 



Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 
Heading for Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Beef, Etc., Etc. 



Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading (or Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and. Courteous Attention to all Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Honlton.Ore. 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" \ >ints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bld£., 
Chicago, Ills. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 

IS THE BEST | 



Rh m^DDnivr r*n 509 mission street 
. n. ncKKurN uu. SAN FRANCI8C0 , C al. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



625 barrels, ,i> compared with 2,763,117 
barrels in 1903, a gain ..i 809,508 barrels, or 25 
per cent. To this may he added 50,000 tons 
which wrrr consumed b\ the boileis in operating 
and drilling wells. 

Tin- production is still, however, but a small 
part nf what the natural resources of Roumania 
are capable of producing tor mam years in the 
future. (iraduaJIv the improved methods of 
production, transportation, refining and market- 
ing are being introduced, which must sooner or 
later result in this country becoming a much 
more prominent factor in the world's markets 
than it is at present. The great broad curving 
of the Carpathian Mountains' base causes many 
minor swells in the strata which follow along 
their flank, producing ideal conditions for the ac- 
cumulation of petroleum over many miles of area 
within reasonable depth. A considerable portion 
of the petroleum continues to be raised in shafts 
or band-dug wells. 

One of the serious conditions which retard 
production in a measure, is the unsatisfactory 
method of transporting and marketing the re- 
fined products. Roumania is centrally located 
geographically and borders on several countries, 
and were it not for the stringent laws and taxes 
regulating the exportation, Austria and Germany 
alone would consume its entire production and 
very much more. It is to the interest of Rou- 
mania to facilitate the development of this in- 
dustry, as the residuum of the refined products 
is almost its only source of fuel, for which it 
now depends largely upon foreign countries. 

The price paid for crude in 1904 was slightly 
greater than in 1903, amounting on an average 
to 30 francs per ton. There was a slight de- 
cline in the value of the manufactured products 
marketed during the year. 

The district of Prahora continues to be by far 
the largest productive section in the Kingdom, 
and in 1904 produced 91.6 per cent of the total 
production. Th<f district of Damboritz pro- 
duced 5 per cent, Bunee 1.6 per cent, and Becan 
1.4 per cent. 

The refineries consumed 391,387 tons and pro- 
duced 109,510 metric tons of refined illuminating 
petroleum, 62,218 tons of benzine, which is a 
much larger proportion of benzine and illumi- 
nating petroleum than was secured in former 
years. There was an increased consumption of 
residuum and crude for fuel purposes on loco- 
motives and steamboats on the Danube. The 
consumption from the source was not less than 
50,000 tons during 1904. 

There is a considerable proportion of the petro- 
leum produced in Roumania hoisted out of shafts 
or pits from 500 to 800 feet in depth. The 
drilled well is fast taking their place, and there 



were ll<>4 feci of shaft* abandoned in 1904, 195 
in preparation and "!•* that were productive. 
Ot the drilled »<-lls. 150 wore abandoned iluring 

1904, 114 Hire worked upon and 224 were pro- 
ductive. 

On September 25, 1904, a very remarkable 

well was drilled in on lot No. 65, Campina, be- 
longing to the Steana Romana Company, which, 
at a depth 1 1 50 feet, began to spout furiously out 
of the 12-inch casing, throwing out petroleum, 
sand and stones to a height of from 300 to 350 
feet, inundating a large area around the well. It 
is estimated to equal 500 wagons of sand, stone 
and petroleum. The flood of petroleum went 
down the highway and was mostly saved by the 
construction of temporary dams over the ravines. 
The eruption lasted sixteen hours and then 
ceased, and the well was brought under control 
and, after being cleaned out, began to flow at 
the rate of 125 wagons per day. The prospective 
undeveloped territory of Roumania has lately at- 
tracted the attention of foreign capitalists and 
financiers. German, French, Belgian, Holland, 
Austrian and American capitalists are all repre- 
sented. The government is interested in the 
development of the petroleum resources of Rou- 
mania and many millions have been expended in 
the purchase of foreign fuel in past years. 

Germany. — The complete returns have not 
been received covering the entire year 1904 at 
this writing. The quantity reported by most of 
the companies was 89,606 metric tons, equal to 
637,332 barrels, valued at 5,804,000 marks, equal 
to $1,392,960. It is possible that complete re- 
turns will increase the quantity to slightly over 
90,000 tons. There was a large gain in the 
production of 1904 over that of 1903, which lat- 
ter was 62,680 tons, valued at 4,334,000 marks, 
owing to the increase in the production near 
Weitze, in Hanover, which began with 1900, 
since which date the production has about doubled 
in quantity. In this field about sixty wells have 
been drilled, twenty-eight of which are produc- 
ing. Their depth ranges from 450 to 1400 feet. 
The petroleum produced from the deeper wells 
is considerably lighter in gravity than wells less 
than 1000 feet in depth. The field is troublec 
with quantities of salt water near the productive 
horizons, which hampers the successful produc- 
tion of many of the wells. 

The other productive field is 300 miles south- 
west, in the province of Alsace, near Lechebroun, 
which field has for many years produced from 
140,000 to 150,000 barrels annually. Both of 
these localities produce mainly a dark, heavy pe- 
troleum which varies from 0.93 to 0.95 in spe- 
cific gravity, or from 20 deg. to 1 7 deg. Baume. 

Nearly all the crude produced in both of these 



fields is refined, and produces about 40 per cent 
nl an excellent lubricating petroleum. 15 to 20 
pel cent of spindle oil, 5 per cent of dark illu- 
minating petroleum, 6 per cent of light illumi- 
nating petroleum and 5 per cent of heavy ben- 
zine. The remainder, about 26 per cent, is as- 
phaltum and loss. 

The heavy import duty levied by Germany en- 
courages the development of the home industry. 
The present import duties on illuminating petro- 
leum is 6 marks per 100 kilograms; lubricating 
petroleum, 10 marks per 100 kilograms. Petro- 
leum intended for industrial purposes, duty free, 
except for the manufacture of lubricating, illu- 
minating petroleum, gas and that intended for 
cleaning, refining or distilling in domestic manu- 
factures and certain products thereof. , 

There has been a considerable amount of com- 
petition to supply Germany with illuminating 
naphtha and lubricating petroleum between the 
United States and Russia ; lately Galacia, Rou- 
mania, and the Dutch East Indies have also mar- 
keted an increasing quantity of their manufac- 
tured products in Germany. The United States, 
owing to the superior quality of the illuminating 
petroleums and the superior organization of dis- 
tribution, has for a number of years furnished 
about 70 per cent of its imports. In the year 
1904 the United States furnished furnished 71.2 
per cent of the imports of petroleum into Ger- 
many; Russia, 17 per cent; Austria-Hungary 
(Galacia), 4.7 per cent; Dutch East Indies, 4 
per cent; Roumania, 2.5 per cent, leaving 0.6 
of 1 per cent to be furnished by the other coun- 
tries. 

Italy. — The center of the petroleum produc- 
tion is at present the Emilia, and particularly the 
wells in the valley of the Chero, at Velleia and at 
Montechino, besides those lately taken up at 
Raglio, in the valley of the Trebbia. Other lo- 
calities of the Emilia are also productive. . An- 
other center of production is at Tocco da Cassau- 
ria (.the Abruzzi), in the valley of the Pescara, 
district of Rome. 

The refining takes place particularly at Fio- 
renzuola d'Arda, in the Province of Piacenza. 
The production was 17,876 barrels, valued at 
$7.96 per barrel, amounting to $142,298. This 
high value is due to the fact that a very fair grade 
of petroleum is produced and that the duties 
levied by the kingdom and cities is very high. 
The duty on petroleum, crude, is 8 lire per quin- 
tal ; petroleum, refined, 48 lire per quintal ; par- 
affine, 15 lire per quintal. On other goods con- 
taining petroleum the duty is established after 
an analysis made at the time of entry. There is 
also an octroi duty for each town, which in Rome 
is 6 lire per quintal, 1 lire being equal to 19.3 
cents and a quintal is equal to 220.46 pounds. 



J? 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 
W. K. OIL COMPANY. 

Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Coal- 
inga, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 12th day of October, 1905, 
an assessment of two and one-half cents (2^c.) 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the 
W. K. Oil Company, payable immediately to J. 
W. Pauson, Secretary, at th^ office of the Com- 
pany, Room 501 Parrott building. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
22d day of November, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 15th 
day of December, 1905, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. 

J. W. PAUSON, 

Secretary. 

San Francisco, Cal., October 17. 1905. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Pittsburg Oil Company 

Location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Location of works, Coalinga, 
Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Pittsburg Oil Company, held on the 23rd day of 
October,, A. D. 1905, an assessment of four (4) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of : this corporation, payable 'immediately to the 
Secretary of £he company, at the office of the com- 
pany, rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, .California. Any stock upon which this 
assessment shall remain, unpaid on Saturday, De- 
cember 2, A. D. 1905, will be delinquent and adver- 
tised for sale at public auction, and, unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, 
December 28th, A. D., 1905, at 11 A. M., to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. J. LAYMANCE, Secretary 

Office— Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the California 
Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
held for the week ending Wednesday, Nov. 22: 

ASSOCIATED— 

'2,000 bonds at . , $92.00 

5,254 shares at 55 

13,833 shares at 56 

CLAREMONT— 

" 3,400 shares at ..:..': 1.10 

' 450 shares at .".■.' 1 . 1 2 l/o 

CHICAGO CRUDE— 

2,400 shares at 08 

FORTY— 

'" 300 shares at 48 

500 shares at 50 

HOME— 

■ 500 shares at 48 

100 shares at 50 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchass of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



STOCKS 

1 handle Mines and Oil Lands and Act 
as Fiscal Agent for Good Securities 

D. L. HEALY 

BROKER 

Member of San Francisco & 
Tonopab Mining Exchange 

524 MILLS BUILDING 

Telephone Main 5747 8an Francisco, Cal 



INVESTMENTS 



SAN JOSE CREMATION ASS'N. 

Now Incorporated. 

PRICES OF STOCK TODAY, PER SHARE $10. 

Prices December Next, $15; July, 1906, $20; 

December, 1906, $25, or Par. 

The Oakland Association has proven a great suc- 
cess, yielding in dividends last year IS per cent to 
first investors. Prices advanced in three years 
frcm $10 to $27 per share. Equal or hetter results 
may be expected from the San Jose Cremation 
Association. 



Pays 7% per cent or $160 per share, two months' 
accrued interest, 

160 shares of Oakland Crematory Association at 
$27 per share. Has paid eight dividends since 
March. 1904, of 30c each. Dividends hereafter 
semi-annually, December and June. 



300 shares Columbian Oil Co., at 50c. Par value 
$1. Nineteen wells in operation. Dividends to be 
paid this fall. 



30,000 5 per cent bonds of the Turlock Irrigation 
District at par, denomination $400 each; issued 
1902, expire in 1942. 



Water front property at $55 per foot. 



125 shares of the Phoenix Savhigs Building and Business property under a lease paying 6 per 

Loan Co. cent on $50,000. Will sell for $36,000. 



FOR STOCK AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 

W. E. BARNARD, 

746 Tenth St-, Oakland, Cal. 

SPECIAL OFFER 

As a special inducement to new subscribers and to induce delinquent subscribers to "settle up" we 
will give as a premium to all new subscribers to the Pacific Oil Reporter, or to old subscribers who 
pay their subscription one year in advance, a copy of the Coalinga Map, printed on a fine quality bond 
paper, without extra charge. These maps sell (or 50c. and are well worth the money. Subscribe 
for the Pacifie Oil Reporter and secure one free. 

SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

' 190.. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 
318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Gentlemen: 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil Reporter for months, commencing 

with the issue. $ . . inclosed herewith in payment thereof. 

NAME 

Subscription Price 

OneYear, - - $2.50 ADDRESS 

Six Months, - - 1.50 

Three" - - - 1.00 



PACIFIC OIL RKPORTER 



IS 



INDEPEND1 NCE— 

17 

KERN RIVER— 

.ares at . 

MONTI CRISTO— 

in ' sliarc< at 74 

41 mi shares at 



i HI Cm PETROL] I M 

1,50 i shares at 

STERLING— 

1,000 shares at 1.40 

SUPERIOR— 

lares at OS 

Following ire the latent quotations for stocks 
of oil companies lintel on tlic Californ'a 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Asked. 

Alma 40 

Arlinc i' 1 

Apollo .Ii» 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer 54 .56 

California-Standard 40 

Caribou 6.75 7.25 

Central Point Com I . 75 

Chicago Crude New 0/ 

Claremont 1.12% 1.15 

Forty 45 .50 

Four 29 .30 

Giant 50 

Hanford 100. (HI 

Home 40 .49 

Illinois Crude .20 

Imperial 13.00 15.00 

Independence 17 .18 

Junction .20 

Kern 13.50 

Kern (New) 09 .12 

Kern River 10.00 

McKittrick 10 .12 

Monarch of Arizona 13 .20 

Monte Crista 74 .80 

Occidental of W. Va .04 

Oil City Petroleum 7(1 .75 

Peerless 6.75 7.50 

Piedmont 05 .07 

Reed Crude 24 

Senator 1 .60 

Sovereign 19 . _ ,: i 

Sterling 1.25 2.00 

Superior 05 .06 

Thirty-Three 5.00 6.50 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7.00 8.00 

1 nion 150.00 I 1 1.00 

Wabash 50 .40 

West Shore I .3(1 1 .65 

Wolverine 50 1 .00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code'* 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1552 



MAPS 

The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
tor Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable L* 

BOX 237 -. 




W. E. YOULB 



WANTED 

Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



H. B. GUTHREY 






Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 

:m==z= in any country :=== 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHREY, Coalinga, California 



14 PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RELIABILITY OUR MOTTO 



BARLOW & HILL 



The up-to-date Map Makers 



BAKBRSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



13 



PriTite loom 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



115JI7JH-32I-323 
Pile St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



Coallnga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co , Five ( 5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



>7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 



Turn 

druilqci 

into J 

pastime 

SgSE 




WHEELER & WILSON M'PB. CO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Be sure to be properly equipped for your hunting trip. 
Use the "STEVENS" and have the assurance that 
your choice cannot be improved upon, and that there 
Is no possibility of your came getting away when 
sighted by our guns. Our line : 

RIFLES, PISTOLS, SHOTGUNS 




hii'K'K 



Ask your dealer,. and|DONT Fail to send for 
insist on our goods'. If illustrated catalog. I' 



youcaunr tobtainlhem 
we will ship direct, ex- 
press prepaid, upon 
receipt of price. 
HITTHH MARK 



:levi 



f ready reference and 
appeals toall interested in 
the grand sport of sin ml. 
ine". Mailed for 4 cents in 
stamps to pay puslage. 
RIFLP! PUZZLE! This 



lovc.ty will be mailed FREE upon request 
J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 
P.O.B0X4093. Chicopeb Falls. MASS..U.S.A, 

a 




The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for thr pro- 
motion of any legitimate piopoai 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patekta or 
Railroads, we can assist yon. 

Companies incorporatid un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prutzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
PAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 3791 San Francisco 



L ZELLERJUC8 & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418. 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., • San Francisco 
Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

Wt carry the Largest Stock. Oar price, are 

Bqtii table. 
Tel. Main. IIS8. 

PATENT S — Un,ted states and 

•———«—■ Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame 
la usually advisable to have boiler 
of machine for oil and gas works. It 
mounted upon trucks separate. 




The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
erating for oil or gas. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 
it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumss, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 



STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Barron, Rickard & McCooe, California Agents, San Francisco 



16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






CABLE ADDRESS 



" ASPHALTAGE' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 



MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ■■■'■ CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG. ,17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



When writing: to advertisers, please mention The Pacific uil Reporter. 



Read 



Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describes 
California and the great West s^o 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers s;ll it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCALE EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 



ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 



Phone James 7116 



California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Oil Chemists 

T P S T 8 

CALIFORNIA PETROLEUM 

Calorific Value, Fractional 
Distillation. Refining, Vis- 
cosity, Freezing, Asphel- 
lii.e, Sand and Water, Btc. 

Kerosene, Asphaltum, Boiler 
Peed and Drinking Water. 

Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 









, U*>r»ry-* 



Vol. 7, No. 5. 



San Francisco, Cal., December 2, 1905. Price 10 Cents. 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



LESCHENS 

DRILLING CABLES /'SANDLINES. 
^CASING a" d TUBING LINES. 



BRANCH OFFICES: 



NEW YORK 



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DENVER. 







WE ARE AGENTS FOB 

LESCHBN LINES... R. H. HEBRON COMPANY 



AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean* 
ing out, pumping, pull* 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jipply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, December 2, 1905 



Number 5 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 



Maria R. ^VI^•^ T , Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastmax, Editor and Manager. . . 



OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 



TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1-50 

Three Months 1-00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

COALINGA. 

Price 
Gravity. per barrel. 

22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22J4 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 

25 deg., or better - 22*/2 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $1 .68 

Pennsylvania 1-58 

Second Sand 1-38 

Corning 1-10 

Newcastle 1-35 

Cabell 1.18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima '• -89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1.34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30' L . gravity +0 

30U to 31 gravity +3 

31 to 31L'. gravity 46 

31 ' L . to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 



J. W. Harrison, coal and metal broker, this 
city, reports that since the departure of the S. S. 
Ventura, there have been the following deliveries 
nt Newcastle coal, namely: Grande Duchess 
Olga, 2,730 tons; S. S. Kirklee, 4,690 tons; 
Montcbcllo, 3.000 tons; total, 10,429 tons. 
These three cargoes arrived here very opportune- 
ly, as very little Colonial coal remained unsold 
in first hands. There are twenty vessels on the 
chartered list to carry coal from Newcastle, N. 
S. W., with a carrying capacity of about 50,000 
tons, several of these vessels will not arrive this 
year. There have been six cargoes of British 
Columbia coal delivered here this month, amount- 
ing to 28,649 tons, with promises of a material 
increase on the quantity shipped monthly during 
the winter months. The principal quantity of 
coal arriving here recently has been delivered 
from ship's side, going direct to the consumers, 
and small dealers, thus saving the yarding ex- 
pense. The prices remain unchanged, although 
the handling of fully ninety per cent of the fuel 
received here is concentrated in very few hands, 
and an increase in prices can be readily made. 
The settlement of the labor troubles in Nanaimo 
is leading to increased shipments from that sec- 
tion, and the character of the output is said to 
show a marked improvement. Fuel oil is main- 
taining its firm hold here among steam consumers, 
its marked economy against the use of coal will 
insure it in its present position for a long time to 
come. Up to date we have had an exceptionally 
mild winter and this serves to minimize the use 
of household coals. 



A falling off of about 1,000 barrels a day in 
gross output occurred during the first two weeks 
of November. On the 15th of the month the 
production of all Texas-Louisiana districts was 
estimated at 77,025 barrels, against 78,040 bar- 
rels on October 31. 

Jennings now tops the list of producing dis- 
tricts. The Louisiana field is credited with a 
yield of 27,500 barrels of good oil and nearly 
10,000 barrels a day of roily. The output has 
ben increased through the deepening and revival 
of old wells. There were no completions at Jen- 
nings during the half-month. 

Humble declined from 26,314 barrels on Octo- 
ber 31 to 23,588 barrels on November 15 — a fall- 



ing off of 2.72d barrels. The indications arc that 
this field "ill continue to show a decrease in out- 
put. Whenever the \ it \ productive wells on the 
West side go off the effect u ill he considerable. 

Dayton developed nothing during the half- 
month, but on the contrary showed a decline 
from 625 barrels output on October 31 to 450 
barrels on November 15. Two new wells were 
completed in the shallow sand, but fell off rapidly 
after coming in and are very ordinary producers. 
The test well two miles east of the field was aban- 
doned at 1 150 feet as a dry hole. 

In the older districts the situation has not been 
materially altered. Great activity is noticeable 
at Batson and at Spindletop. The output of the 
fields has shown no change worthy of comment. 

Prices have reached the 50-cent level for oil at 
the well on thirty-day November contracts at 
Spindletop. Sour Lake contracts for light oil, 
this month, are within a few cents of the Spindle- 
top figure. The market is firm and will remain 
so until new gusher production is developed in 
Texas or Louisiana. The demand for Texas- 
Louisiana crude is around 80,000 barrels a day, 
and has been built up on the basis of gusher out- 
put. Any number of pumping wells will have 
small effect toward keeping the level of produc- 
tion up to requirements. Reserve stocks are light, 
and if there is a severe decline in output either 
at Humble or Jennings the effect upon the market 
will be immediate. 

Operators are turning their attention to wild- 
catting and several prospects have been reported 
in the last two weeks, none of which, however, 
have developed into the real thing. 

The movement of crude oil from Port Arthur 
and Sabine for the half month amounted to 239,- 
510 barrels, against 251,360 barrels in the cor- 
responding period of October. Refinery products 
shipped from the two ports in the two weeks 
amounted to 307,911 barrels, against 290,327 
barrels in the same period last month. 

A summary of field operations from October 
31 to November 15 shows 19 wells completed, 
against 16 in the first two weeks of October; 58 
wells drilling on November 15, against 32 on 
October 15, and 13 rigs up on November 15, 
against 16 on October 15.— Oil Investors' Jour- 
nal. 



4 

EASTERN EXPORTS 

Following are the exports of mineral oils from 

the Eastern ports of the United States for the 
month of October, 1905: 

Customs Districts. Gallons. Dollars. 
Crude — 

Delaware 7,775,658 430,159 

Philadelphia 2,046,610 111,193 

Galveston 1,263,158 63,181 

Total 1 1,085,426 604,533 

Naphthas — 

Baltimore 1,760 245 

. New York 208,042 27,507 

Philadelphia 1,940,41 1 131,694 

Total 2,150,213 159,446 



Illuminating — 

Baltimore 2,824,883 226,355 

Boston and Charles- 
town 85,366 9,903 

New York 41,334,548 2,754,913 

Philadelphia 27,995,729 1,492,210 

Galveston 3,084,641 188,934 

Total 75,325,167 4,672,315 

Lubricating and paraffin — 

Baltimore 180,450 18,844 

Boston and Charles- 
town 11,829 18,844 

New York 8.327,152 997,943 

Philadelphia 3,483,527 349,789 

Galveston 714 

Total 12,002,958 1,368,762 

Residuum — 

Boston and Charles- 
town 180,000 9,000 

New York 2,125,902 64,440 

Philadelphia 784,597 23,487 

Galveston 10,500 438 

Total 3,100,999 97,365 

Total Mineral Oils — 

Baltimore 3,005,333 245,199 

Boston and Charles- 
town 11,829 2,186 

Delaware 7.775,658 430,159 

New York 51,995,644 3,S44,803 

Philadelphia 36,250,874 2,108,373 

Galveston 4,358 299 252,553 

Total 103,664,763 6,902,421 

Transportation of Pe- 
troleum 

The first petroleum produced in the Oil Creek 
Valley of Pennsylvania was barreled and con- 
veyed by wagon to the creek and there loaded 
into boats and barges and delivered to points from 
the mouth of Oil Creek to Pittsburg. Large 
quantities were hauled overland to Union City, 
where it was shipped on the railroad to Eastern 
and Western destinations. A considerable por- 
tion was hauled to Shaw's Landing on French 
Creek and carried to Erie by canal. 

The railroads soon reached the main valleys 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



and provided wooden tanks or cars, but owing 
to the penetrating and salient nature of petro- 
leum, transportation by these methods was al- 
ways accompanied by a large percentage of loss 
by leakage. 

The transportation by river was also improved 
by the construction of bulk boats, which carried 
from 1,500 to 2,000 barrels in eight watertight 
compartments. While these improved methods 
removed a part of the difficulties, there yet re- 
mained the obstacles that were encountered in 
conveying the petroleum produced a few miles 
away from the lines of transportation. This for 
several years was accomplished by teams and 
wagons, and the roads were usually almost im- 
passable so that it was accomplished with great 
hardship to man and beast. 

It was these conditions that restricted the quan- 
tity of the petroleum that could be carried to 
the main lines of transportation. This condition 
of affairs caused the early operator to seek some 
source of relief. 

The first successful pipe line was constructed 
by Mr. Daniel Van Syckle, of Titusville, Pa., 
in the summer of 1865, extending from Pithole 
to the railroad on Oil Creek at the Miller farm, 
a distance of between four and five miles. In the 
fall of the same year another line was constructed 
by Mr. Henry Harley, from Bennington Run to 
the Shaffer farm. Afterwards both of these lines 
were united under the title of the Allegheny 
Transportation Company. These lines were suc- 
cessful, much to the discomfiture of the teamsters, 
who in some instances pulled the lines in two with 
their teams. These and other difficulties were 
soon overcome, and the pipe line became an im- 
portant factor in the collection and transporta- 
tion of petroleum to points of shipment by rail 
or water. 



Snooting An Oil Well 



The shooting of an oil well requires great skill 
and care. The shooter takes the nitroglycerin 
from the magazines and places the quantity or- 
dered in padded compartments of his wagon. On 
arriving at the well he arranges the apparatus 
to lower the shells. They are let down with a 
rel and a fine line of the best manila fibre. The 
first shell is suspended over the hole and the 
nitroglycerin is poured out of the can into the 
shell. Some of the shells are very long and thin 
while others are short and fat. Where the long 
shells are used it is desired to shatter the rock 
for a long distance up and down the hole, and 
when the short shells are used a blast at one 
particular point is desired. The shooter lowers 
the shell into the hole when it is filled. He knows 



by markings on his line when to slacken the speed 
with which the shell is being dropped and he 
deposits it safely on the bottom of the well. An- 
other shell is filled and lowed on top of the first 
one, and so on until all of the torpedo is in the 
well. Then the firing head is sent down. This is 
a short, thick shell sometimes not over two feet 
long, with a core of nitroglycerin surrounded by 
a jacket of sand. In the nitroglycerin is a per- 
cussion cap attached to the end of a rod which 
extends out att he upper end of the firing head. 
When this is in place the line is removed and 
the torpedo is ready for the go-devil. 

The go-devil is a billet if iron about two feet 
long, cast with three or four wings or flanges ex- 
tending along its sides. These wings are to in- 
sure that some part of the go-devil hits the iron 
rod extending down into the firing head. The 
go-devil is dropped, and when it strikes the firing 
head it explodes the nitroglycerin in the firing 
head. This in turn explodes the entire torpedo. 

Not infrequently the torpedo fails to explode, 
when a squib, a small shell of nitroglycerin, is 
sent down. A waterproof fuse extends into the 
squib and is timed to explode when the squib 
reached the torpedo. There are instances of 
record where even the squib has failed to explode 
a torpedo, which go to show the peculiar proper- 
ties of nitroglycerin. It will sometimes burn 
without exploding, but is sure to explode if 
allowed to become heated to more than ninety 
degrees in the nitrator. It is frequently exploded 
by a small shock, but again cannot be exploded 
and every nitroglycerin company has experienced 
the drilling out of a shot. When a shot is drilled 
out, the heavy drill is run down the hole and the 
torpedo smashed and crushed into the bottom; 
then a fresh torpedo is placed in the well. This 
one usually explodes without difficulty. 

One of the things which a shooter always fears 
and guards against is a premature explosion. Not 
infrequently does a shell explode as it is being 
lowered into the well. This almost always ruins 
the oil well and judgments have been recovered 
against the nitroglycerin companies in large sums 
for oil wells ruined by such accidental explosions. 
The shooter is always careful to wipe off any of 
the explosive that may have accidentally slopped 
over and run down the outside of the shell, but 
the friction against the sides of the well as the 
shell goes down often explodes It. 

That such premature explosions have claimed 
many victims is emphasized by the recent disas- 
ter at Upper Sandusky, by which the shooter, his 
helper and several bystanders, some of them chil- 
dren, lost their lives. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Mews from the Field 



SANTA MARIA. 



pondence. 

Santa M \ mber 28. 

We see taken of the Oiled Roads 

decision, bv which the claims of oiling roads was 
tn have been monopolized by a certain company, 
hut the Supreme Court held that oiling roads by 
any process was permissible. 

For cheap and durable road building there is 
nothing to equal oil when properly used. In tin's 
locality it lias made out of sandy mads as good 
roads almost as macadam, and much easier on 
the horses' hoofs. The residuum of overflowing 
wells has particularly cheapened the oiling of 
mails. 

Oil has advanced in the Fast, but we can per- 
ceive no benefit from it here. The Standard Oil 
Company is very willing to demand more for its 
products, but not to give the producer any more 
ity compels. 
There are few field nots for this issue: Brook- 
I:n ( )il Co. has a fishing job on its No. 5 well, 
_h they have met with but few accidents as 
a whole. 

The Pennsylvania Oil Co. has levied an assess- 
ment tn pay for its land. Its No. 1 is in oil 
.'.ome time, but they are deepening the well to the 
depth of the standard wells in this fine oil field. 
The pipe line passes by them and whenever the 
well is in readiness there is ready sale for the oil. 
Hall & Hall have a single well on their Foster 
lease which flows 300 to 400 barrels a day and 
will pay about $2,000 per month. 

Claremont Oil Co.'s well No. 7, about two 
miles west of Orcutt, on the southwest end of 
the Arellanes ranch, is about 1500 feet deep with 
seepages of oil. If this shows a good well at the 
usual depth of the other wells (2500 to 3000 
feet) it will have expanded the proven o : l terri- 
torj by a three-mile stretch west. Those inter- 
ested are anxious to see results. The principal 
officers of the Union Oil Co. are interested in 
this property. 

The Los Alamos Oil Development Co. is re- 
ported to have oil in its deep well on the De La 
Gueira lease at a depth of 4200 feet — an un- 
usually deep well. It will depend, however, on 
the amount of production when finished to deter- 
mine whether it will pay or not. 

The Union Oil Co. is reported to have an 
eye mi the Panama Canal route for the trans- 
portation of its oil tn Atlantic points. The fol- 
low ing is current newspaper report and we give 
it for u hat it is worth. 

"The company is reported be negotiating with 



the authorities at Washington for a right of waj 

SS the isthmus ,,t Panama for a em 
tor a pipe line about forty-tWO miles long across 
the isthmus with terminal facilities in the wav 
of wharves and oil tanks at Panama mi the P.,. h, 
coast and Colon on the Atlantic roast. 

"The expense of the line will be about $1, 

for the reason that it already has some very 
large and valuable orders tor the delivery of fuel 
oil in Europe, provided it can get the oil there 
quickly and cheaply. It is known, according to 
the Examiner, that it already has been given on 
these terms an order for 2,000,000 barrels of oil 
by one English concern. 

"It is because of the representations of this 
English firm, a firm of great financial wealth, 
together with a promise of the patronage of other 
great firms, that the Union Oil Company has hit 
upon the remarbly attractive, important and yet 
withal simple expedient of piping its oil from 
tank vessels at Panama to tank vesels on the At- 
lantic, thereby saving a remarkable amount of 
time and expending in landing California oil in 
Europe. 

"It is the saving of time and expense which 
makes a pipe line across the Isthmus of Panama 
a most significant undertaking. In the matter 
of mileague, the pipe line is most insignificant." 

L. E. B. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES 



The Hanford Oil Company has just paid a 
regular monthly dividend of $2 per share, 
amounting to $4000. 

California & New York Oil Company reports 
that it will commence spudding in its No. 3 well 
the coming week. It has installed a steam-head 
pump for its water plant which is a very complete 
system. Good supply of water at 200 feet is 
reported. No. 2 is doing a lighter oil and less 
sand ; the driller says she acts very much like No. 
1. The property is looking well and No. 1 seems 
to be doing the same, a fine producer. 

California Monarch No. 1 well spouted last 
Saturday morning. It could be heard a mile away. 
The blow out was like steam, white and most 
powerful. There was enough sand to cut into a 
large hook used in handling the casing, but not 
near as much as she made at the last blow out. 
The superintendent is very confident that he can 
control the well this time, as the hole is clear of 
all junk. It is over 1335 feet deep. Sunday 
morning it was making less gas and the oil was 
coming. The company is prepared to handle the 
oil this time. No. 4 well is ready for the per- 



forator. No. 12 well has in eight inch drive Rod 
thej expect in shut off the water this week. 

\ 25-ton smelting plant is to be installed at 
the antimony mines in Humboldt county, Nevada. 

Pen tons of ore shipped from the strike at 

Sand Springs, Churchill county, Neveda, showed 

a value Ol $20 in gold and SISlI in silver pel Mo. 

The production of gold in Nevada reached 
i0,494 in 1904, an in, rease o\ ei the pi eced 

ing year of SI .'I'M), I 44. Practically the whole 

of this increase should In- credited to the new 

camp of Goldfield, which produced over $2,300,- 
000 during the year. The returns from silver 
producers indicate an increase of $333,918, of 
which the greater part is derived from the Corn- 
stock mines. Tonopah, it is said, remains very 
productive, with an output of about $1,230,000 
of silver, commercial value. 

Chemical examination of the ore samples sup- 
posed to contain radium recently received by the 
State Mining Bureau from H. C. Jones of Kern 
county has developed the afct that none of the 
samples contain any trace of radium, according 
to State Mineralogist L. E. Aubury. Chemist 
E. B. Preston, who made the examination, re- 
ports that the specimens are made up of obsidian, 
chloropal and semiopal, all of which substances 
are of no commercial value. 

The number of producing mines in the West- 
ern tSates, exclusive of Alaska, in 1904, was 
3254. To this should be added several hundred 
producers in Alaska and probably over a hun- 
dred in the Southern Appalachian states, which 
would make a total of about 4000. The total 
number of placer mines reported is 1349 and of 
deep mines 1905. Colorado has the largest num- 
ber (567) of deep producing mines, and is fol- 
lowed by California, with 474. In number of 
placer mines, California easily leads with 711, and 
is followed by Idaho, with 263, and by Oregon, 
with 21 1 mines. California has by far the greater 
number, 1185, of producing mines, and is fol- 
lowed by Colorado, in which the number is 588. 
The ore body in the west 500 of the Empire 
Gold Mines, Ltd., continues to show up very 
promising and values are increasing. The best 
results are being obtained from the new chlorin- 
ation plant which is running twenty-four hours 
daily. The recent rains have been of much bene- 
fit to the local mining industry, furnishing a 
plentiful supply of water, which was much 
needed. 

The free milling ore bodies opened up in the 
Murchie mine increase in value as depth is at- 
tained. Exceptional values are already b 
secured. Work is being pushed forward as rap- 
idly as possible. The mine promises to become 
one cf the best gold producers in the section. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Foreign Production of Pe- 
troleum in 1904 

III. 

great britian. — Petroleum and natural gas 
are both known to exist in certain localities in 
England, but thus far no large reservoir has been 
found. For the last seventeen years or more 
there has been some production from a coal mine 
in Derbyshire, amounting to a few barrels an- 
nually. None, however, has been reported for 
1903 and 1904. It is also found in small quan- 
tities in Lancashire and Shropshire. There are 
a number of localities in which petroleum and 
natural gas with showings of petroleum have re- 
cently been developed at Netherfield, in Sussex. 



years ago was only imported to the value of 
£39,000 per annum, has now reached a figure 
bordering upon £2,000,000. During the same 
period also the American oil has shown a pro- 
gressive tendency, for the imports to the United 
Kingdom, while being under 70,000,000 gallons 
twenty years ago, now stand at 146,000,000 gal- 
lons. The import of Russian oil increased 
from 1885 to 1891, until it stood at a value of 
£785,000, but then a sudden drop for the next 
few years brought down the value to £347,000. 
The history of the downfall of the Russian oil 
trade of this country will long remain in the 
memory of a great many persons interested in the 
industry at that time — the time when the at- 
tempt was made by the Baku Standard Agency to 
introduce Russian oil, but owing to the absence 
of a distributing organization in this country the 



and there is not the least doubt that in future 
years the "other countries" will occupy even a 
more prominent position in the list of importing 
countries. 

DUTCH EAST INDIES, SUMARTA, JAVA AND 

Borneo. — Complete returns for the production 
of petroleum on these islands are difficult to se- 
cure, and the figures must, therefore, be con- 
sidered as closely approximating the production. 
Sumatra has by far the largest production, 
amounting to about 70 per cent, of the entire 
output of the islands named, a large portion of it 
being petroleum of a paraffine base. Sumatra 
also contains the largest refineries. The quantity 
of petroleum produced and of refined petroleum 
exported has yearly increased since 1900. This 
has been accomplished by the development of 
new fields after the failure of the original fields, 





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Pioneer Transportation in California Oil Fields — The Sunset Stage. 



SHALE OIL. — This industry has continued, 
notwithstanding the severe competition from the 
natural products of the United States and Rus- 
sia. The combined production of all the shale 
oil industry in Scotland and England amounts 
'auurEJEd puE 1)0 10 spjjEq OOO'OZX WoqE oj 
besides about 32,000 tons of sulphite of am- 
monia, annually. The industry has been care- 
fully and scientificially managed ; even then the 
margins of profit for the past ten years have 
been small. 

imports. — The figures covering the imports of 
petroleum into the United Kingdom during the 
years 1885 to 1904 show at a glance how rapid 
has been the development of the use of oil for 
various domestic and commercial purposes in the 
Lfnited Kingdom. Russian oil, which twenty 



oil market became greatly disturbed, and very 
little benefit fell to any one's lot. From 1895 
to 1898, however, Russian oil improved, yet it 
never reached the position it occupied in 1891. 
It was in 1899 that the combination took place 
between the leading importers of Russian oil, 
namely Ressler Waechter & Co., on behalf of 
Nobel Bros., and the Anglo-Caucasian Company, 
on behalf of the Rothchilds, under the now well- 
known name of the Consolidated Petroleum 
Company. The result has been that Russian oil 
has made headway upon the English markets, 
and today the yearly value of the products from 
that country is about £2,000,000. The imports 
from "other countries" have during the past 
decade increased enormously, mainly owing to the 
shipments from Borneo, Roumania and Sumatra, 



which made it necessary to build. many miles of 
pipe lines. 

The development in Java has not kept pace 
with that of Sumatra, and the production has 
been evenly maintained for a series of years. 
There are a number of refineries on this island 
that produce a fair grade of illuminating products. 

The islands of Borneo largely increased its 
output in 1904 over that of 1903. There are two 
varieties of petroleum produced, distinguished as 
light and heavy crude, and many of the wells are 
large producers. The two principal fields are 
Balik Pappan and Sanga-Sanga, situated about 
fifty miles apart in eastern Borneo at the mouth 
of the Mahakkam River. A refinery is located 
at Balik Pappan, the petroleum being conveyed 
fiom Sanga-Sanga by water in boats carrying 350 
tons. Owing to the wildness of the interior, the 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



dense growth of tropical vegetation and the lack 
of skilled labor the development has not been 90 
rapid as it would have been if these conditions 
had not existed. The petroleum produced in Bor- 
neo is chiefly used for fuel, and the refining is 
principally to secure a percentage of the tighter 
products contained in the crude, so that it can 
safely be marketed as fuel. The greater portion 
is transported to points of storage and consump- 
tion by the Shell Transportation Company. 

There is usually about 25 per cent, of the 
lighter products removed by distillation, the re- 
maining 75 per cent, being marketed as fuel oil. 

In North Borneo, in the British portion, pe- 
troleum is found at West Sarawak, in the dis- 
trict of Sadong. Among the smaller islands of 
this group, extending west for many miles. Timor, 



DO barrels: Borneo, 19 I'>n4, 

1,815,000 barrels; total, 1903, 6,1 .rrcls; 

1904, 8,008,300 barrels. 

PHILIPPINE INI \\[>s. — Crude petroleum is 

reported to exist in the southern portion of Luzon, 

the western portion of Panay. the central portion 
of Ncgros, and ill number of other islands that 
compose the group. Some of them are worked in 
a very crude manner by the natives. Petroleum 
is also reported to be found on the islands of 
Guimaris, Zehu and Minanao. The geographical 
position of these islands, with Borneo on the south 
and west and Formosa and Japan on the north, all 
of which produce petroleum, as well as the gen- 
eral similarity geological conditions, would in- 
dicate that it should also be found in the Philip- 
pines. The United States furnishes about 55 
per cent, of the present consumption of petroleum 
and its products. The remainder is supplied by 



During 1903 and 1904 several wells were drilled 

in the Ishikari district which indicated the pres 
ence of petroleum in quantity; later t<Ms, how- 
ever, have given rather 1 -suits. 
Hiere are indications of petroleum scattered 

a large portion of this northern island of Japan, 
and there air also indications of petroleum on the 
island (it Formosa and some small production in 
a primitive way. 

The production in EchigO and the indications 
elsewhere are usually in the middle and newer 
Tertiary formation. Their individual occur- 
rence is invariably on the flanks or along the 
crest of well-marked anticlinals. Generally these 
anticlinals are of comparatively short extent, as 
they suddenly burst up out of the level newer for- 
mations, run their course, with slight undulations, 
for from half a mile to two or three miles, and 
then suddenly plunge under the level surface of 




A part of the Kern River Field. 



Serari and Celebes contain numerous traces of pe- 
troleum and have a limited production. 

The refined products of the petroleum pro- 
duced in Dutch East India do not compare in 
quality with those of the United States, «n<2 are 
also inferior to much that is manufactureo .-n 
Russia. They are sold at prices that are less 
than those obtained for the American and the 
Russian articles. The great mass of the natives 
of these islands and of the surrounding countries 
— China, India and Siam — are satisfied with an 
inferior grade of cheap petroleum, as they con- 
sume it generally in crude clay lamps without 
chimneys. 

The production of these three islands is esti- 
mated as follows for the years 1903 and 1904 :& 
Sumatra, 1903, 4,880,000 barrels; 1904, 5,325,- 
000 barrels; Java, 1903, 680,000 barrels; 1904, 



Russia and the Dutch East Indies. 

japan. — The main supply of petroleum thus 
far developed in the Empire of Japan is found 
on the island of Nippon, in the province of 
Echigo, on the northwestern coast, about 200 
miles northwest of the city of Tokyo. There 
are other localities on this island where some 
petroleum has been produced, namely in the 
province of Ugo, in the extreme northern por- 
tion, and in the province of Totomi, about 150 
miles southwest of Tokyo. The total output 
in 1904 was 59,588,214 gallons compared with 
52,206,000 gallons in 1903. 

The island of Hokkaido or Ezo has produced 
some superior grades of crude petroleum, in a 
limited way. near the western flank of the foot- 
hills of the great mountain chain running to the 
north, in the provinces of Mikawa and Ishikari. 



the plain. There are other cases where the ridge 
of an anticlinal can be traced for ten or fifteen 
miles continuously. 

There are usually steep-dipping flanks on both 
sides of the anticlinals, which soon carry the oil- 
bearing strata to depths too great to be reached 
by the drill, or at which the strata is saturated 
with water. The depth of the wells is from 750 
to 1.S00 feet, and probably 80 per cent, of the 
production comes from drilled wells. The re- 
mainder is from dug wells or shafts which range 
in depth from 200 to 500 feet. The present pro- 
duction is maintained by the deepening of many 
of the wells that have exhausted the upper pay. 

The formation holding the crude petroleum is 
generally a loosely cemented sandstone of a 
bluish cast, with more or less small crystals of 
pure silica, and in some cases with pebbles in- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



terspersed; the formation varies from 5 to 40 
feet in thickness. These are usually beds of blue 
shale or clay capping the sandstone, and in many 
wells they follow each other in succession. A 
few of the wells flowed naturally when the field 
was new. At present nearly all of the wells are 
pumped. The life of the average well in some of 
the fields is not long, as a few weeks or months 
find the output greatly reduced from the original 
volume ; others decrease more slowly. It requires 
the constant drilling of new wells and the deepen- 
ing of others where lower productive strata have 
been developed to keep up the production in most 
of the fields. 

The petroleum produced in the early history 
of the development generally came from hand- 
dug wells, which ranged from 100 to 500 feet in 



During the last six or eight years the greater 
portion of the production has been secured by 
regularly cable- drilled wells, and some wells 
were drilled by the Canadian rod system. It is 
rather surprising that the workmen of this coun- 
try should so soon have acquired the knowledge 
that enables them to drill wells where there are 
serious difficulties encountered, and a very large 
amount of skill is required to accomplish the end. 
In several of the fields the improved method of 
pumping wells in clusters by wire rope and solid 
connections is used. There are also a number of 
pipe lines connecting several of the fields with re- 
fineries that have been laid and are operated by 
Japanese workmen. There is, however, a consid- 
erable percentages of crude petroleum transported 
from the points of production to these native re- 



lubricating petroleum is manufactured. 

The other refineries are almost entirely in the 
hands of two powerful native companies, which 
also control a very large percentage of the pro- 
duction of the crude petroleum. These are known 
as the Nippon and the Hoden companies. The 
refineries operated by these two companies, which 
find a ready sale at a reduced price, although the 
flash test of the illuminating petroleum is gener- 
ally too low for safety. All of the petroleum pro- 
duced in Echigo is of an asphalt base ; hence there 
can be no paraffin produced. The quality of the 
crude varies in the different fields to a marked 
degree. Some of it will produce as much as 65 
per cent, of illuminating products, the larger por- 
tion will produce only from 30 to 40 per cent., 




Standard Oil Refinery and Tankage, Point Richmond 



depth. These wells were roughtly cribbed with 
timber as they proceeded down. A supply of 
pure air was furnished the workmen at the bot- 
tom by means of a peculiar bellows operated 
from the top. All of the hoisting was done by a 
cable made of rice straw. 

One of the other methods of drilling is known 
as the "bamboo rig," in which large bamboo 
poles are spliced and joined together by iron 
bands and are coiled upon the outside of a large 
reel or wheel, on the inside of which one or two 
workmen raise or lower the tools by treading. 
The tools are of iron, with steel bits, and in the 
operation of drilling are raised by means of a 
lever in the upper portion of the derrick or by a 
walking beam attached to a windlass. 



fineries in tin and wooden cases on the backs of 
coolies. The heavy distillate or residuum is also 
transported in the same manner from the re- 
fineries back to the wells, where it is used as fuel. 
The locomotives in Echigo use residuals and in- 
ferior crude petroleum as a fuel, and its use in the 
crude and residual condition is almost universal 
in pumping and drilling wells and under the 
boilers of the pipe lines. 

The refineries are quite numerous in Echigo, 
about forty now being in operation. Some of 
them are primitive; others are fairly well 
equipped. The best refinery is that recently 
erected by the International Oil Company at 
Naoyetsu. It was built and is operated by Ameri- 
cans, and a superior quality of illuminating and 



and a still poorer grade from the Nutsu field will 
only give 20 per cent. This last finds a market 
as a fuel oil at Nugata and on the railroad be- 
tween Naoyetsu and Nugata. 

Japan imports large quantities of illuminating 
and lubricating petroleum and naphtha, chiefly 
from the United States, Russia and the Dutch 
East Indies. The imports amounted in 1904 to 
81,671,801 gallons, equal to 1,944,543 barrels, 
valued at 18,201,490 yen, or $9,063,345. The 
production is about 480,000 barrels of refined 
products. There are, therefore, over four bar- 
rels of petroleum products imported to one barrel 
produced. 

Thee is a government tax amounting to 0.076 
yen per gallon on the illuminating petroleum 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



products, and 10 per cent, ad valorem on parrafin 
oil, naphtha, vaseline and mineral grease. Crude 
petroleum and parrafin are duty free. The impor- 
tation from the United States is chiefly in cases; 
that from Russia is largely in hulk. There arc 
storage tanks at Nagaski, Ybkaichi, Kobe, * )sage 
and Yokohama. The storage of case oil is largely 
in the hands of the government, which has large 
warehouses at the principal ports of entry. The 
influence of the war between Japan and Russia 
has stimulated the foreign trade and importation, 
espcially that of petroleum products, as the im- 
ports for 1904 were much greater than for any 
previous year. 

India. — This country is rapidly increasing its 
production of petroleum. The output for 1904 
was 3,385,468 barrels, as compared with 2,510,- 
259 barrels in 1903, an increase of 35 per cent. 

Almost the entire production is in two dis- 
tricts in upper Burma, known as the Yengenyat 
and the Yengenyoung fields. Both of these lo- 
calities are close to the Irawaddy River. The 
Yengenyoung field is 300 miles in a northern di- 
rection from Rangoon and about 250 feet above 
the bed of the Irawaddy, although cut by several 
deep ravines. It extends for three miles in a gener- 
al northwest and southeast direction and averages 
half a mile in width. There are about seventy 
drilled wells producing in this district, and about 
100 hand-dug shafts or pits. The drilled wells 
range from 700 to 1,450 feet in depth. The other 
district, known as Yengenyat, is fifty-five miles 
farther, north up the river, and is about three- 
quarters of a mile to the west of the river. Owing 
to the scarcity of vegetation the structural condi- 
tions of this section are readily determined by the 
exposures, and a well-marked anticlinal with a 
gentle dip of 15 deg. to 20 deg. to the west and of 
from 60 deg. to 80 deg. in the east is well ex- 
posed. This can be traced many miles further to 
the north of the producing areas known as the 
Tangyi Hills by following the axis line or by off- 
setting to other parallel anticlinals. The Irawad- 
dy River breaks through one of these axis lines 
between these two fields. The parallel ridges to 
the east pi the Yengenyoung production are 
known as the Pagan and Gwegys hills, and are 
marked lines of uplift out of a comparatively level 
plain. The geological equivalent of this section 
are the Miocene and Pliocene division of the Ter- 
tiary group. The wells usually encounter a 
number of sandstones of a bluish color that are 
from ten to sixty feet in thickness. They contain 
many quartz grains and are usually capped by a 
bluish shale. 

As many as twelve separate sands have been 
found in a single well, but not more than three 




Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal, 



WM. WAI, LACE B. W. CHARtESWORTH 

WALLACE 5- CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, 
Toilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 

COALINGA, CAL. 



P&B 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 




CAR TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



FOR ALL. USES 



We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

nd can moun on wood or steel underframes. 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oi 
of all sizes up to and including 

55,000 BARRELS 



in 1 Refineries Complete Oar Specially 



WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE AND W O R K S : — W A R R E N , OHIO 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



or four have thus far proved productive. Many 
of these wells flow originally as much as 600 to 
1,500 barrels per day, but in the course of time 
they all become pumping wells, continuing to be 
productive for from eight to ten years, and grad- 
ually diminishing until their production is too 
small to be profitable. Many of the wells when 
they have arrived at that condition are drilled 
deeper, and a second or third pay streak is often 
developed, which greatly lengthens their pro- 
ductiveness. Over 98 per cent, of the production 
of India comes from these two fields. They have 
been connected during 1904 by pipe line about 
forty-seven miles in length and six inches in 
diameter. From Yengenyoung the crude petro- 
leum is carried in large iron barges to the refinery 
at Rangoon. 

Nearly all the petroleum found in Burma and 
Assam has a parffin base. The general average is 
from 5 to 10 per cent, of paraffin. The oil in many 
cases will chill on the derrick floor at a tempera- 
ture of 77 deg. F. The general specific gravity of 
the petroleum in Burma and Asam is from 32 
deg. to 38 deg. Baume, probably 36 deg. is the 
true average. Besides the usual 5 to 10 per cent. 
of paraffin, from 60 to 70 per cent, of inferior il- 
luminating product is secured, which has a gen- 
eral average of about 43 deg. Baume. A less 
quantity of a much superior grade of illuminating 
petroleum could be secured, but it is more profit- 
able to manufacture a larger quantity of an in- 
ferior quality. There is from 3 to 5 per cent, of 
heavy naphtha, from 10 to 25 per cent, of 
lubricating petroleum, and from 8 to 10 per cent, 
of residuum obtained. A very superior candle is 
made from the paraffin. 

The entire business in Burma is in the hands 
of the Burma Oil Company, which has a monop- 
oly of the industry. The Upper Assam field has 
only really started since the new refiner)' has been 
completed by the Assam Oil Company. This is 
located at Digboi, some sixty miles inland from 
Dibrugarh, on the Bramapootra River, near the 
extreme northwestern portion of Upper Assam, 
where an inferior grade of illuminating petroleum 



Flow of Natural "Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



WESTERN COOPERAGE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

STAVES and HEADING 

For Both Tight and Slack Work. 



OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 



WhiteSpruceSaves and Heading 
all ready to set up for Fish, 
Pickles or Lard packages ol 
any size. 



Fir Tight Barrel Staves and 
Heading for Oil, Lard, Pork, 
Beef, Etc., Etc. 



Fir Slack Barrel Staves and Heading for Asphalt, Lime 
Cement and Bottle Barrels. 



Prompt and Courteous Attention to all Inquiries. 



MILLS at Aberdeen, Wash, and Hoolton.Ore. 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" jiints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern BIdg., 
Chicago. His. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



READING 



(IRON) 



Drive Pipe = = Casing = = Tubing = = Line Pipe 



18 THE BEST |j 



R. H. HERRON CO. 



509 MISSION STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL- 



is manufactured, which finds a ready sale and is 
distributed down the» river as far as Gauhati. 

There have been twenty-two wells completed 
in this field, nearly all of which are producers, but 
the capacity of the refinery at present is not suffi- 
cient to test their output. The oil company here 
owns eight square miles of productive territory. 
,A superior grade of paraffin candle is made at 
Digboi, which has a much wider range of sale 
than the other manufactured products. 

There are many indications that India will 
in the future produce a much larger suantity of 
petroleum than it does at present, as the struct- 
ural conditions of Assam and Burma are favor- 
able in many localities that have not been suffi- 
ciently tested to develop the deposit of crude pe- 
troleum that underlies them. 

The development of the petroleum resources 
of Burma and Assam has exceeded the rate of 
growth in the coal trade. For 1902 the pro- 
duction amounted to nearly 57,000,000 gallons, 
and then represented a substantial inarease on 
previous years. 1903 the output rose to nearly 
88,000,000 gallons, of which "over 85,000.000 
gallons were raised in Burma. Though this is 
far from meeting the total demand in India the 
home production has already affected the imports 
rf fore'gn oil, which have steadily increased dur- 
ing the past three years from nearly 99,000,000 
gallons in 1901-2 to 80 500,000 gallons in 
1903-4. The production for Assam has risen 
from abcut 1.750,000 gallons in 1902 to 2,500,- 
000 in 1903. In addition to a low-grade burning 
oil and solid paraffin, petrol is now being manu- 
factured. 

china. — The importation of refined petroleum 
from the United States into China during 1904 
was very materially increased over that of pre- 
vious years. The quantity imported from Sumatra 
was also largely increased, while that from Rus- 
sia has largely decreased during the last three 
years. There were 41,093,567 gallons of refined 
petroleum, valued at 4,729,448, exported from 
the United States to China during 1904. The 
complete returns for 1904 are not available at 
the present writing. 

China produces a very limited quantity of 
petroleum and natural gas associated with salt 
water, but owing to the great distance of the in- 
land localities only satisfactory reports can be 
secured. For many centuries in the province of 
Szechaun wells have been drilled by a most primi- 
tive and laborious method from 2,500 to 3.000 
feet in depth that have produced large quantities 
of salt brine, and natural gas and petroleum in 
limited quantities, the natural gas being used ex- 
tensively as fuel to evaporate the salt brine. 

The petroleum obtained from the wells is of 
four different qualities. The first is of a very 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTKR 

light color, and is used in its natural state for 
burning with refined petroleum in special lamps: 

the second is ot a greenish color, and is less val- 
uable than the first ; the third is of a yellow- 
color, and the last is black, very thick and vis- 
cous. The oil first mentioned is also employed 
by the Chinese for medical purposes for various 
diseases, especially for skin diseases and rheu-' 
matism. 

The temperature of the petroleum and salt 
water, as it comes from the wells, is about 250 
deg. C, while the temperature of the atmos- 
phere is only about 40 deg. C. 

World's Production. — The following ta- 
ble gives the entire production of crude petrole- 
um in all the known countries for 1903 and 
1904, and under the head of "All other coun- 
tries" an estimate for all of the smaller coun- 
tries which are known to produce a limited quan- 
tity of petroleum, but from which it was impos- 
sible to secure returns. 

There is a remarkable increase in all the 
known countries producing petroleum. In the 
United States the increased production in the 
new fields of Kansas, Texas, Louisiana and Cal- 
ifornia has in the last two years amounted to 
more than one-half the crude of the entire world. 
The increase in the world's production in 1904 
over 1903 was 23,958,990 barrels, equal to 12.3 
per cent., as compared with a gain of 5.4 per 
cent, in 1903 over 1902 and 11.7 per cent, in 
1902 over 1901. The increase in the United 
States in 1904 over 1903 was 16,602,084 bar- 
rels. For the same period in Russia there was 
an increase of 2,909,649 barrels. There was a 
notable increase in the production of India, Rou- 
mania and Germany. Of the world's produc- 
tion in 1904 the United States and Russia pro- 
duced 89.24 per cent. ; India, Galicia and Rou- 
mania produced 5.89 per cent., leaving 4.87 per 
cent, for all the remaining countries. 

This table is one of production only, irre- 
spective of quality and value. The quality of 
the greater proportion of crude petroleum pro- 
duced in the United States is superior to any 
other in the percentage of valuable products 
secured by distillation : 

1903. 
Quantity. Percentage. 

Country. Barrels. of total. 

United States 100,461,337 51.46 

Canada 481,504 .25 

Peru and South Ameri- 
can countries 61,745 .03 

Russia 75.591,256 38.73 

Galicia 5,234,475 2.67 

Sumatra, Tava and Bor- 
neo .. ' 6,640,000 3.40 

Roumania 2,763,117 1.42 

India 2,510.259 1.29 

Japan 964,000 .49 

Germany 445,818 .23 



1! 

Italy 1,000 

All other countries .... 30.000 .03 

Total 195,203,511 100.00 

1904. 
Quantity. Percentage. 

Country. Barrels. of total. 

United States 117,063,421 53.42 

Canada 492,492 .22 

Peru and South Ameri- 
can countries 66,200 .03 

Russia 78,500,905 35 . 82 

Galicia 5,947,383 2.72 

Sumatra, Java and Bor- 
neo 8,008,300 3.65 

Roumania 3,572,625 1.63 

India 3,385,468 1.54 

Japan 1,411,975 .64 

Germany 637,332 .30 

Italy 36.400 

All other countries 40,000 .03 

Total 219,162,501 100.00 ' 

The following table is compiled upon the as- 
sumption that there were 45 per cent, of the 
refined products secured from the entire pro- 
duction of the United States in 1904, as com- 
pared with 20 per cent, refined products secured 
from the Russian pruJut-* ; on and 25 per cent, 
from the production of all remaining countries: 

1904. 
Quantity. Propor- 
United States. lion. 
Country. Gallons. Per cent. 

United States 2,212,498,656 73.1 

Russia 565,407,602 18.7 

All other countries 247,780,840 8 2 

Total of all countries..3,025,686,098 100.0 

Therefore the United States produced 2.72 

barrels of refined products in 1904 for every 

baFrel produced by the remaining countries in 

the world. 

The purest and most valuable crude petro- 
leum continues to be produced in the Appalachian 
and the Lima, Indiana, field; their refined prod- 
ucts are marketed in all portions of the world 
at higher prices than any other because of their 
intrinsic worth. A very fair grade of illumi- 
nating products is secured in Sumatra, Java, 
Galicia, Roumania and India. The Russian 
products are heavier and of fair quality, but 
recently their lighter products are in a great 
measure a by-product, necessarily removed to en- 
able the great bulk to be marketed as fuel petro- 
leum with a required flash test. The crude pro- 
duced and marketed in Texas, Louisinia and Cal- 
ifornia is not usually treated in any way, except 
to meet the requirements of the countries to which 
it is exported. 

The safe and cheap transportation by pipe lines 
to the seaboard and fro mthence by tank ships 
has carried petroleum and its products to all the 
quarters of the globe, and it is the most universal 
source of artificial light and is to a considerable 
extent a source of power and fuel. 



12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 
W. K. OIL COMPANY. 

Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Coal- 
inga, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 12th day of October, 1905, 
j.n assessment of two and one-half cents (2%c.) 
per share was levied on the capital stock of the 
W. K. Oil Company, payable immediately to J. 
W. Pauson, Secretary, at the office of the Com- 
pany, Room 501 Parrott building. Any stock upon 
which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
22d day of November, 1905, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, unless 
payment is made before, will be sold on the 15th 
day of December, 1905, to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment, together with the costs of advertising 
and expenses of the sale. 

J. W. PAUSON, 

Secretary. 

San Francisco, Cal„ October 17. 1905. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Pittsburg Oil Company 

Location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Location of works, Coalinga, 
Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Pittsburg Oil Company, held on the 23rd day of 
October, A. D. 1905, an assessment of four (4) 
cents per share was levied upon the capital stock 
of this corporation, payable immediately to the 
Secretary of the company, at the office of the com- 
pany, rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Any stock upon which this 
assessment shall remain, unpaid on Saturday, De- 
cember 2, A. D. 1905, will be delinquent and adver- 
tised for sale at public auction, and, unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on THURSDAY, 
December 28th, A. D., 1905, at 11 A. M., to pay 
the delinquent assessment, together with costs of 
advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. J. LAYMANCE, Secretary , 

Office — Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building,. San Fran- 
cisco, California 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Arline Oil Company, a corporation; principal 
place of business San Francisco; location of prop- 
erty, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 18th day of November, 
1905, an assessment of two cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 501 Parrott 
Building. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remaia unpaid on the 28th day of Decem- 
ber, 1905, will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and, unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on the 20th day of 
January, 1906, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

J. W. Pauson, Secretary. 

Levied Nov. 18, 1905. 
Delinquent Dec. 28, 1905. 
Sale January 20, 1906. 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist en purchase of Mines and Prospects 
R«f»r*oces on application 



STOC KS 

I handle Mines and Oil Lands and Act 
as Fiscal Agent for Good Securities 

D. L. HEALY 

BROKER 

Member of San Francisco & 
Tonopah Mining Exchange 

524 MILLS BUILDING 

Telephone Alain 5747 San Francisco, Cal 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Standing price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will soon be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be follow "1 bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 



W. E. BARNARD, 



746 Tenth St. 



Oakland, Cal. 



SPECIAL OFFER 

As a special inducement to new subscribers and to induce delinquent subscribers to "settle up" we 
will give as a premium to all new subscribers to the Pacific Oil Reporter, or to old subscribers who 
pay their subscription one year in advance, a copy of the Coalinga Map, printed on a fine quality bond 
paper, without «xtra charge. These maps sell for 50c. and are well worth the money. Subscribe 
for the Pacifie Oil Reporter and secure one free. 

SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

190.. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 
318 Pine Street, San Francisco 

Gentlemen: 

Please enter my subscription to the Pacific Oil Reporter for months, commencing 

with the issue. $ inclosed herewith in payment thereof. 

NAME 

Subscription Price 

OneYear, - - $2.50 ADDRESS 

Six Months, - - 1.50 

Three" - - - 1.00 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



13 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE. 

Following arc the si 
Stock anil I .nj;e in the formal s 

held tor the »>-ek ending Wednesday, \"\. 29: 

iated — 

1640 shares at 55 

1910 shares at 56 

Claremont — 

1550 shares at II- 1 j 

1 shares at 1.15 

Four — 

I shares at 



Monarch — 

100 shares at I s 

Monte Cristo — 

shares at 77 1 - 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 
of oil companies listeil on the California Stock 
and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Asked. 
Alma 40 

Arline .40 

Apollo 05 .06 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . . .56 .57 

California Standard 40 .42 

Caribou 6.75 7.25 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude New 07 

Claremont 1-12% 1.15 

Forty 45 .50 

Four 29 .30 

Giant 50 

Hanford 190.00 

Home 45 .48 

Illinois Crude .20 

Imperial 14.50 

Independence 16 .18 

Junction .20 

Kern 13.50 

Kern (New) 09 .12 

Kern River 10.00 

McKittrick 10 .12 

Monarch of Arizona 13 .15 

Monte Cristo 7^ .85 

Occidental of W. Va 03 .(14 

Oil City Petroleum 70 .74 

Peerless 7.00 7.50 

Piedmont 04 .07 

Reed Crude 24 

Senator 1 .60 

Sovereign 19 .25 

Sterling 1.30 2.00 

Superior 05 .06 

Thirty-Three 5.00 0.00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7.25 8.25 

Union 102.50 170.00 

Wabash 30 .40 

West Shore " 1.25 I . 70 

Wolverine 55 1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Us« "Western Union Cod»" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Maia 1652 



MAPS 

The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know y > 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
Tor OH or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable L- 

BOX 237_ 



WANTED 




W. E. YOULB 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

: Oil Weil Tools 

I OH Well Casing and 
Pipe 

I Engines and Boilers 

1 Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 2i, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUI_I_Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



H. B. GUTHRBY 

Oil Well Contractor 

Specifications furnished on wells of any depth 
. in any country :=== 

WATER SHUT OFF IN OIL WELLS 

Many valuable oil properties in this state saved by our process 
which is sure and permanent 

Our references are our past customers 

H. B. GUTHRBY, Coalinga, California 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RELIABILITY OUR MOTTO 



BARLOW & HILL 



The up-to-date Map Makers 



BAKERSFIELD, 



CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



IS 



Prifite loomi Phone Main 5966 Jules Wittmann 

Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



S15-3I7-319-3ZI-323 

Pile St,. S. F. 



Open Ereaings 

Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 

New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 




WHEELER & WILSON MT1 CO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SM1TB & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five ( 5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitau Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



■7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angbi.es 



Seattlb 




The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for thr pro- 
motion ol any legitimate, ptoposl- 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. IrH. 
gatlon, Mercantile, P&ttiU or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies qjcorporatbd un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 



TO 
THE 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER. 



The accuracy and reliability of STEVENS Rifles 
and Shotguns have won for them an enviable repu- 
tation the world over. Our 140-page 

BOOK ON FIREARMS, FREE. 

It contains a full description of STEVENS Arms, 
also valuable information on hunting, the proper 
rare of firearms, notes on sights, ammunition, etc. 
You should have it. Send two 2-cent stamps to 
cover postage. 

* Stevens=naynard. Jr.," . $3.00 

*' Crack Shot," 4.00 

"Stevens Little Krag," . . 5.00 
*' Favoiite, No. 17," . . . 6.00 

CLEVER RIFLE PUZZLE sent FREE. postpaid 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 

P.O.Bov 4 093. 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS., U.S. A. 






Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

analysis and refining 
tests of petroleum 
analysis of asphalt & 
pat& lubricating oils 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisci 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twint 
and Supplies of every descriptor 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry the lArgeii stock. Oar prices arc 

Bquitmble. 
Tel. Main. 1188. 



PATENT S — United States and 

«•■»•»—— Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 
of machine for oil and gas works. It , ,. „„_ , ...... 

mounted upon trucks separate. lts tests ran 3 e Trom sh a"°w water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools. Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Harron. Rickard & McCone. California Agents, San Francisco 




16 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



' ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



^MALTHA — > 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE IZ= CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL ELDG., 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 

"When writing- to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describes 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCALE EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 



Phone James 7116 



315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS - TE8TS - ASSAYS 

Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Clay 

Tank Caps and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAIV FRANCISCO 









Vol. 7, No. 6. 



San Francisco, Cal., December 9, 1905* 



Price IO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



LESCHBM'S 

DM LLING CABLES / P SAN DLI N ES . 
^CASIHG^TUBING LINES. 



BRANCH OFFICES 
WAREHOUSES! 



NEW VORK 



•DENVER 



CH ICACO. 




WE ARE AGENTS FOR 



LE8CHEN LINES... R. H. HEBRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean- 
ing out, pumping, pulb 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, December 9, 1905 



Number 6 



DAPICIf* f\\l DCDADTCD ^' le rccclU assessment levied on the capital 

rAUIML UIL nLrUnlLn gtock of ^ California-Fortune Oil Company 

Published Weekly. brings to min( | ()ne of our souni i est California oil 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. . . , , ,. , . 

. , , , _, ... . _ , ... , . , corporations which has continually struggled 
Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners Ass n. 

against adverse circumstances since the day it was 

Maria R. Winn. Proprietor. ; n a position to market its product. We say 

E. S. Eastman-, Editor and Manager. . . .. advcrs( ... Dccaiisc we cannc)t find a more fitting 

office and editorial ROOMS word under present conditions in the oil world; 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California vet the future will very likely reveal the fact that 

Teleph one, Bu sh 176. .^ (s onc of (he oil companies f ortuna te!y sit* 

TERMS. ate ,j so tn at it could not sell its oil at a market 

One Year $2.50 . 

ej_ '\t ont hs 1 50 P nc e so far below its true worth as to be ridicu- 

Three Months 1 .00 lous. The California Fortune Oil Company has 

Single Copies 10 f (]ie fines{ . f oi[ rtv ; n t h e State. 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Its four wells proved to be wondrously good ones 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 

or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil and have naturally flowed several hundred thou- 

Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms sands of barrels of oil which has been stored in 

31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied . . . , . . •u. 

, . . , , , ., , reservoirs awaiting a sale as it was not possible 
by writer s name and address, not necessarily tor 

publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. to cap the wells on account of a heavy gas pres- 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- sure " hich would have forced the cas!n S from 

ifornia, as second-class matter. them. With a ready market at even a reasonable 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. price, heavy dividends would be possible without 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- further drilling. The present price of oil does 

nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- not warrant its being marketed, while the pros- 

nized buyers: pec ts f or a g00 d market in the future are the 

coalinga. best Consumption of oil has reached or passed 

Price per barrel. ;.,... , 

22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 the P olnt of production and every source of sup- 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22y 2 ply will soon be eagerly sought out and a price 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 paid that will enable all to thrive. Fortunate 

kern river. indeed is the oil company whose property has 

14° gravity or better 18c been so located that it could not "sell" (give 

santa MARIA. away) its product. It has been impossible to 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 exhaust its territory without profit. 

25 deg., or better - 22% 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. . . . . 

Tiona ...$1.68 A peculiar situation in the California oil in- 

Pennsylvania 1.58 dustry has been recently brought to our attention. 

Second Sand 1.38 Tf ; s the fact that very few o{ those engaged in 

Corning !••« 

Newcastle 1-35 the development of the oil fields are dependent 

Cabell 1.18 or are depending on the industry for a livelihood. 

North Lima 94 Q ^ ^ contrar the industry seems to be de- 
south Lima o" 

Indiana 89 pending more or less upon the private resources 

Somerset 89 f h er igaged ; n ; t . This is rather a strong 

Ragland 49 6 & . 

Corsicana light 89 statement to advance, yet it is borne out by un- 

Corsicana, heavy 50 deniable facts, which any layman can verify if he 

Canada •••••■• A: 34 so desires. We recently had the opportunity of 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30 1 /; gravity 40 scrutinizing a list of names representing the ma- 

30V; to 31 gravity 43 jority of producers and heavy stockholders of 

3}'° 31 ^ grav ! ty lq California oil companies. Among them we found 

31 1 ,/; to 37 gravity 4V 

32 gravity and over 52 clothiers, bankers, merchants, real estate agents, 

TEXAS lawyers, doctors, and many other men of various 

Humble 34 professions and occupations. In about one case 

Batson, 22 55 ^ 

Batson, heavy i2 in ten we found the gentlemen reaping a living 

Saratoga 34 f rum the oil industry — the other nine were sup- 
Sour Lake, 21 porting it. It is quite possible that the above 

Sour Lake, heavv ■" ., , , 

Spindletop 4-5 conditions are more or less responsible tor the 



fact that many companies are willing to produce 
oil at a loss, making up the deficiencies by numer- 
ous and generous assessments. The small stock- 
holder has no voice in the matter, being supposed 
to take his medicine heroically. The large stock- 
holder is in control and it is evidenth a matter 
of personal pride with him to support a corpora- 
tion that can boast of several large producing 
wells — even if he is selling the product at a price 
that is several cents per barrel less than the cost 
of production. The various Eastern and South- 
ern oil fields have been developed by men who 
devoted their whole time to the business and ex- 
pected to make a living from it. They would 
rightly scorn a man who would conduct his busi- 
ness on a losing basis. They know what it costs 
to produce a barrel of oil and would not sell it 
without a profit. The California so-called "oil 
man" (generally speaking) is a disgrace to his 
industry. He reminds us very much of the Irish- 
man who contracted to saw a cord of wood for 
$2 and sub-let the contract for $3, stating as his 
reasons therefor that it was worth $1 to boss 
any job. He wanted to show his importance. So 
does the average California "oil man." He thinks 
the honor of being recognized as a "producer" is 
worth whatever profit he may derive from his 
private resources, or about five cents per barrel 
on the total, production of his pet oil company. 
Wake up, man ! wake up ! 



The local press has discovered that the As- 
sociated Oil Company has acquired control of the 
Pacific Oil & Transportation Company, together 
with its various possessions. The details of this 
sale were fully published in the Pacific Oil Rh- 
porter in its June 24th issue, last. No doubt the 
generous public will be glad to again hear the 
story as it seems to have been impossible for it to 
conceive that the Pacific Oil and Transportation 
Company, the Coalinga Oil and Transportation 
Company and the National Oil and Transporta- 
tion Company are for all intents and purposes a 
part of the Associated Oil Company, and are 
owned and controled by it. A business trans- 
action with any one of them would be equivalent 
to a transaction with the Associated Oil Com- 
pany. Inasmuch as all existing contracts of the 
trio of corporations went to the Associated it is 
quite possible that the matter of the Petroleum 
Development Company being called upon for the 
fulfillment of its contract can be fully explained 
by the fact that the Associated Oil Company is 
in a position to use the oil to advantage on ac- 
count of its rapidly growing business and natural- 
ly takes advantage of the contracts in its posses- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Mews from the Field 



SANTA MARIA. 

Santa Maria, Cal., Dec. 6. — Notwithstand- 
ing the quietness generally in the oil fields of the 
S ate — owing mainly to the low prices offered by 
the Standard Oil Company, and in the interior 
to the high freight rates to bring the oil to mar- 
keting points — the Santa Maria field is the only 
one where continuous development keeps up. And 
the Union Oil Company leads all others in its 
development work. As an instance of the work 
going on we find them drilling or deepening on 
five different leases, as follows: Wells Nos. 1, 
2, 3 and 4 of the Folsom lease (No. 2 of this lease 
came in as a heavy gusher last month) ; wells No. 
7, Sand 9 are going are going down on the Hobbs 
lease (one of the finished wells of the Hobbs, 
either 4 or 5, developed into a heavy flowing well 
— around 800 barrels a day). On the Fox lease 
drilling is going on in No. 4 and at the same time 
No. 1 and 3 are being deepened to the lower 
fuller yielding oil strata. Four wells are under 
the drill in the Hartnell ; this lease is where the 
famous gusher developed — a gusher that started a 
full year ago and is still actively spouting oil. 
Finally on the Santa Maria Oil & Gas Co.'s 
lease the Union is continuing further drillings. 

The Union Oil Co. has had quite a contract 
with the Standard, starting back nearly two years 
ago; this contract is about out, and as the Stan- 
dard will not give them as satisfactory a price as 
before, we understand that the Union Oil Co. 
will not deliver them any more oil. The Union 
having its own pipe line and its own ships for 
distribution can be entirely self dependent in the 
marketing of its oils. 

As we mentioned a week ago it was currently 
reported that the Union had tankage at Panama, 
with ships just getting in commission to deliver 
oil from the end of their pipe line near Port 
Harford into these ships, which would ply direct- 
ly to Panama. This would give them control of 
Mexican and Central American points, as well 
as a distributing point for vessels that would ply 
on the South American coast. With a pipe line 
across the Isthmus they would further enlarge 
their distributing facilities. With this increased 
distribution in view it is no wonder the Union is 
so heavily increasing its prospective output. 

We have in no ways any official report from 
them or any of their men, but we are right here 
in the field and see what is going on. Rumor has 
it in addition that the Union will soon be erect- 
ing a wharf at Avila Beach, in San Luis Bay, for 
the better accommodation of their vessels and oil 
ships. The Standard Oil Company (Pacific 



Coast Oil Company) has its pipe line terminating 
nearer the west end of San Luis Bay, better 
known as Port Harford. There is plenty of room 
for them all and apparently as yet an inexhausti- 
ble supply of light gravity oil to draw from in this 
northern end of Santa Barbara county. 

FURTHER NOTES OF THE FIELD. 

The Pinal Oil Company is drilling on their 
No. 1 1 well. A recent eye witness watching the 
flow of their No. 10 well reported it a hummer. 
It filled two tanks whose capacity was known in 
less than 24 hours and represents a flow at pres- 
ent of over 1200 barrels a day of 28 degree grav- 
ity oil. Even if in time it comes down one-half, 
what a well it is! Brookshire Oil Company, a 
sister company to the Pinal, and almost as suc- 
cessful, struck a snag in the way of a long fishing 
job. Their tools got stuck in one of their deep 
wells and they have been at a standstill for a 
while. 

The Radium Oil Company is still slowly peg- 
ging away at their initial well, and we wish them 
success for their perseverance. They are close to 
very fine deep wells. 

The Graciosa Oil Co. is working away at their 
several deep wells. They are an independent 
company, and do not sell any oil to the Standard. 
They have in view a nindependent pipe line to the 
coast. Half of it is already built to the Casmalia 
depot on the Southern Pacific, and when they are 
ready it is easy for them to continue to the ocean 
beach at or near the old Point Sal landing. 

L. E. B. 



KERN COUNTY 



Bakersfield, Cal., Dec. 5. — Word has been 
received in Bakersfield that the Standard Oil Cc. 
has been sending crews of firemen and engineers 
to the stations between Bakersfield and Mendota 
in view of starting the Kern River end of the line 
to work once more. If the Standard commences 
to move Kern River oil it will doubtless have a 
beneficial effect on conditions in the field. Nearly 
the entire production is being used as fast as pro- 
duced and if the Standard moves much oil through 
its line it will be in the market to replace at least 
some of the oil moved. 

Work on the Southern Pacific pipe line to De- 
lano is being rushed as fast as possible. Double 
crews are now; at work and in a short time will 
be ready for the initial run of oil. Work on the 
boiler plant and pumping station at the field end 
is rapidly being completed, so when the line is 



laid to the plant all will be ready to start the oil 
through, 

Operators in the Kern field think there must 
be a shortage of oil from the Coalinga field, as 
the Pacific Oil and Transportation Co. has called 
for 60,000 barrels of oil per month due on an old 
contract with the Sterling Oil and Development 
Co. When the Pacific Oil and Transportation 
Co. finishes its line from Coalinga to Monterey 
the Sterling ceased to deliver oil on this contract, 
and since that time has been delivering to the In- 
dependent Producers' Agncy. This sudden call 
for oil from Kern River would indicate that the 
supply of oil from other sources is not up to the 
demand. When the Pacific Oil and Transporta- 
tion Co. ceased to take the Sterling oil they gave 
as a reason that with the completion of their pipe 
line at Coalinga they could not afford to pay the 
railroad rates from Bakersfield, and now these 
shipments of 60,000 barrels per month surely 
would not be made from Bakersfield unless a 
shortage had shown up. 

John Page, general superintendent of the Stan- 
dard Oil Co.'s pipe line department on the Pa- 
cific coast, was in Bakersfield last week. Oil men 
think his presence here may have something to 
do with the starting of the pipe line from Bakers- 
field to Mendota. 

F. J. Carman is down to the 3000-foot mark 
on the Grace lease, drilling in shale with some 
sand in it. The formation is standing up and 
without bad luck Mr. Carman has hopes of carry- 
ing the hole to the 4000 foot level or until oil is 
found. 

The Petroleum Development Co. on section 
24 is still waiting for pipe at a depth of about 
2400 feet. 

The Imperial and Thirty-Three oil companies 
will finish up what new work they have laid out 
for this year. What will be done in the future 
by these companies will depend upon the condi- 
tions in the field and the outlook for the oil busi- 
ness during the first part of 1906. 

Companies composing the Independent Pro- 
ducers' Agency are getting rid of their oil nearly 
as fast as produced now and have to hold but 
very little of it in sump holes and tanks until the 
Associated is ready to receive it. 

The Peerless will commence to spud in on well 
No. 53 within the next few days. This com- 
pany keeps one string of tools at work constantly 
drilling new wells and finish one about every 30 
days. This they find necessary to keep up the pro- 
duction to the average maintained for the last 
twelve months. 

The local papers report that the Sterling Oil 
Co. will drill ten to fifteen new wells on its 
property, but inquiry from Superintendent Mar- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tin of both thr Sterling and Sovereign fail to 
prove ;im new work contemplated h\ eithei of 
them shortly. Mr. Martin think- iinlcs> condi- 
tions improve very shortly there is no likelihood 

of their doing any new work for some time to 
come. 

The Sacramento Oil Co., which has been shut 
down entirely tor some time, started up all its 
wells beginning with the first of December. 
Whether this company has made a contract for 
its production, or will store the oil as produced 
as the West Shore Oil Co. did for past year, is 
not known, but companies that have been shut 
down for some time starting up is some en- 
couragement that an improvement is in sight. 

It is generally reported that the Standard's 
contract with the Monte Cristo Oil Co.. which 
ha- expired or very nearly so, has been renewed 
for a term of years — time not stated. These per- 
sistent and regular reports such as this has led 
the producers to believe that the Standard will, 
beginning with about the first of January, enter 
the market as buyers of oil. 

Work on the Union Oil Company's reser- 
voir is nearing completion and if work 
is commenced on another at once the pro- 
ducers will be satisfied that the Union will enter 
the market in this field. The Union might be 
able to fill a one-half million barrel reservoir with 
its own oil, but if it constructs tankage for 1,000,- 
000 barrels it will have to buy oil to fill them. 

Generally speaking the Kern River field is 
showing a marked improvement in the way oi 
promising conditions for the future, and higher 
prices for the product in the near future is ex- 
pected. The theory of a shortage of oil suitable 
for fuel uses is generally entertained and this 
must eventually bring about improved conditions. 



SAN L&UIS OBISPO. 



San Luis Obispo, Cal., Dec. 6, 1905. 

The San Luis Obispo field is showing an ac- 
tivity that commences to place it among the im- 
portant oil fields of the State. Possibly its im- 
portance cannot be considered in the light of 
present supply and demand but for prospective 
future it stands at the head of undeveloped fields 
in California. Half a dozen strings of tools are 
running within a few miles of San Luis Obispo 
by corporations and individuals that have been 
successful in other fields. This alone gives the 
industry an air of stability unknown in the ma- 
jority of new oil fields that are usually developed 
by squandering, wild-cat corporations. 

The Tiber Oil Co. is down nearly 1700 feet 
with its No. 1 well, having passed through some 
700 feet of oil stratum. It is claimed that this 
well is good for several hundred barrels of oil 
daily but that it has been cased off with the hopes 



•ting a better grade of oil at .* lowei level. 
Several thousand barrels of oil have run out be- 
tween eatings which has been collected in sump 
holes. It is quite heavy, probably about 10 or 

!_' gravity, ami the company would much prefer 

a lighter oil. The hole is in excellent condition 
and the drilling will continue until a lighter oil is 
reached or the country fully tested. Eight-inch 
casing is the last string in the hole. 

The Associated ( )il Co. is erecting two derricks 
on its recently acquired property in this county. 
It is generally conceded that its land is nearly all 
oil hearing and the company is showing its faith 
by going ahead with the drill. Every new well 
adds to the extent of the field and operations by 
so prominent a corporation are gladly welcomed. 

The Santa Lucia Co. is continuing its work 
on No. 1 with every expectation of bringing in a 
good well. A considerable quantity of oil has 
already been found in this well but the best results 
will be obtained before its completion. W. E. 
Youle, the founder of the corporation and its 
principal stockholder, has full charge of the drill- 
ing ope-ations and his long experience in operating 
in the oil fields of California has inspired the other 
stockholders of the company with confidence that 
Mr. Youle is on the right road to a good oil 
well. 

Perpetual Oil Co. continues drilling uninter- 
ruptedly with promising indications in the way of 
formation, although no oil has been encountered. 
This corporation was organized by the principal 
stockholders of the Tiber Co., although its prop- 
erty is some twenty miles .distant along the same 
anticline. The well is about 1750 feet deep with 
8-inch casing and the hole is in good condition. 

Bert Rice and Wm. Logan have each organ- 
ized an oil company to operate in this county and 
derricks have been erected on- their property. 
Future developments will be reported from time 
to time. F. L. D. 



COALINGA. 



Coalinga, Cal., Dec. 6, 1905. 
The W. K. Oil Company's well No. 1, after 
being delayed for about a week, has resumed 
drilling and is now at a depth of 2450 feet. W. 
K. No. 2 started to spud in on the 27th, and the 
rig for No. 3 is being built, and it is thought that 
drilling will commence on this well in the near 
future. 

The Turner Oil Company, whose property 
consists ofh alf of section 2, has completed its 
rig for well No. 1, and the rig for No. 2 is now- 
being built. Both of these wells will be in opera- 
tion soon. 

Kaweah No. 2 is over 1300 feet deep with 10- 
inch casing. 

The derrick of Independence well No. 9 has 



been rebuilt and the well is pumping a- formerly. 

Their No. 7 ha- been cleaned out and shows 
quite an improvement in its production. 

The derrick of well No. I of the Stockholders 

Oil Company, which was wrecked in the 

storm, has been rebuilt. 

Union Oil Company's well No. 3 is now 31 II) 
feet deep. 

Nathan well No. 3 is 1665 feet deep with 
6%-inch casing. 

Coalinga Pacific No. 3 is 1450 feet deep. 

Stockholders well No. 4 has reached the paj 
sand is now about 1100 feet deep. The 7%- 
inch casing will be put in this week, and they ex- 
pect to finish this well in the near future. 



The California and New York Oil Co. will 
commence "spudding in" its No. 3 well this week 
at the south line of its property. They have com- 
pleted their water system and are now "hooked 
up" to their own water plant. They have in- 
stalled an additional boiler to their plant, which 
they have centralized, having enough gas to fire 
both boilers. Well No. 2 has made a lot of sand 
and the oil is increasing and is lighter. 

The California Monarch Oil Co. property on 
section 31 is increasing in production every month. 
Supt. Canfield reports well No. 4 has been per- 
forated and is showing up nicely. They have 
three oil sands well defined, and they propose 
thoroughly testing each sand, having perforated 
the lower sand first. Well No. 12 has the water 
shut off with 10-inch drive pipe at 1500 feet and 
is now in with the 6-inch drive pipe and going 
fine. The producing wells are making oil unin- 
terruptedly. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES 



The tank steamer Rosecrans was cleared Dec. 
5th for Honolulu with 23,000 barrels of crude 
oil in bulk, and 25 drums gasoline, valued at 
$32,600, as its cargo. The ship Marion Chil- 
cott was also cleared Dec. 5th for Honolulu with 
16,000 barrels of crude oil in bulk, valued at 
$22,400, as its cargo. Both vessels were loaded 
at Monterey. 

There has recently been a persistent report cir- 
culated that the Standard Oil Company has se- 
cured an option on the controlling interest of the 
capital stock of the Associated Oil Company. In- 
quiry at the heads of both of the above named 
corporations brings forth an absolute denial of 
the story which seems to have had no tangible 
foundation. A persistent inquiry on our part 
leads us to believe that the Standard Oil Com- 
pany or its ally, the Pacific Coast Oil Company, 
does not own a share of Associated Oil stock. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Murchie gold mines at Nevada City has 
just encountered a new pay shoot on the 400 
drift west, which has been heretofore unknown 
in the mine. It is 890 feet west of the main 
shaft. An upraise will be made on this shoot to 
the surface. 

The Empire gold mines, located at Gold Val- 
ley, in addition to chlorinating their own concen- 
trates, are chlorinating the concentrates from the 
Willoughby mine. Their chlorination plant has 
been giving perfect satisfaction. 

Oil has sold recently at Beaumont at 50 cents 
a barrel, and contracts for thirty days were made 
freely at that price. This is the Spindle Top oil 
and is the basis for other districts less the pipe line 
rate to Beaumont. Scarcity of production is 
given as the basis for the continual increase in 
price and unless new pools are found it is pre- 
dicted that crude oil will go much higher and 
possibly to a dollar. 

The recent drop of 2 cents in the price of crude 
oil, had a discouraging effect upon operators, who 
had just begun to become active because of the 
continual advances. They say the reduction is 
astonishing in the face of the fact that the Stan- 
dard's reserve supplies are low and winter is 
approaching, when operations always grow small- 
er in number. The theory the local men have is 
that the Standard takes this method of forcing out 
the hidden supplies. 

Capitalists from outside of California will, the 
first of February next, exercise options on the 
property at Whittier, Cal., of the Central Oil 
Company, taking over the entire plant, valued at 
upwards of a million dollars. Change of manage- 
ment and possible improvement and enlargement 
of the property will follow the close of this deal, 
which has been pending for a year. 

There has been a steady drain in the stocks of 
both the eastern and central western fields during 
the past month, while the runs from wells, des- 
pite increased activity, have failed to keep up the 
supply on the same lines of the summer months, 
and with the winter coming on there will grad- 
ually be a wider and wider gap between these 
items of runs and shipments or supply. 

The oil industry on the Pacific Coast has now 
advanced to such a point that there is not suffi- 
cient tonnage to enable the prompt transportation 
of the commodity. A short time ago the Union 
Oil Company purchased four of the largest oil 
carrying steamers on the eastern coast, and now 
the National Oil and Transportation Company 
has contracted with the Newport News Ship- 
building Company for a vessel that will be 400 
feet in length, 50 feet beam and 30 feet depth of 
hold. She will be able to carry 50,000 barrels of 
oil, and it is intended to run her between Mon- 
terey, which is the terminus of the company's pipe 
line, and Portland. 

The decision of the Federal Court in Los An- 



geles that people who wish to put oil on public 
roads need not pay a royalty for employing that 
process is of interest to every user of oil on roads. 
Three years ago Sacramento county stepped to the 
front, the pioneer in the matter of oiling country 
roads in Northern California. The Board of 
Supervisors, as then constituted, studied the meth- 
ods employed in one or two of the southern coun- 
ties, who had tried oil on roads, and decided that 
there was room for improvement. The oil ap- 
plying machinery used in the south did not seem 
good to the local board, and besides the parties 
who built the machine wanted a royalty for its 
use. The result was that the Sacramento Super- 
visors contrived a machine of their own that was 
much more satisfactory, did the work better and 
with less expense. The Dustless Road Company 
in the south, the owner of the patent for the road- 
oiling machine, brought suit against Sacramento 
county for the infringement of their patent. The 
suit has just been decided in favor of the defend- 
ants. This is believed to be the end of the suits 
for infringement of patent on oiled roads. 

The financial statement of the Daly West 
Mining Company of Utah for October, 1905, 
shows that the total receipts were $132,964; dis- 
bursements, $61,120; net, $70,943. The divi- 
dend requirements were $36,000, while $34,943 
was added to the surplus. 

Mexico's production of copper in the year 1903 
was 45,315 tons, and in 1904. was 50,945 tons, 
showing an increase of 5630 tons, and giving 
Mexico the second place on the list of copper pro- 
ducing countries in the year 1904, the United 
States taking the lead with 361,980 tons, the 
world's production being 651,000 tons. 

At a recent meeting of the Cripple Creek, 
Colo., mine owners, an agreement was reached 
for the construction of the proposed new drainage 
tunnel. The tunnel company agrees to dispose 
of sufficient of its capital stock to realize $800,000 
by July 1, 1906, and to start boring the tunnel 
within sixty days thereafter and continue the 
work until completed. The mine owners agree 
to pay the tunnel company, beginning on July 1, 
1907, 2 per cent of the value of all ores produced 
thereafter from the portion of the' mining prem- 
ises lying above a certain section of the tunnel. 

California is the only State in the union that 
produces magnesite, which is a native magnesium 
carbonate, composed of 47.6 per cent magnesia 
and 52.4 per cent carbon dioxide. During 1904 
the quantity of crude magnesite produced was 
2850 tons, valued at $9298. With the exception 
of 51 tons mined in Fresno and Napa counties, 
this was all derived from the deposits at Porters- 
ville, Tulare county. For 1903 the quantity re- 
ported was 3744 short tons crude, valued at $10,- 
595, equivalent to 1361 tons calcined, worth 
$20,515. The demand for both crude and cal- 



cined magnesite on the Pacific Coast is limited 
and prohibitive freight rates have thus far pre- 
vented shipments to the East. Oregon and Cali- 
fornia consume the entire native production. 

Inside of two weeks, it is said, the new 10- 
stamp mill at the Oustomah mine of Nevada ' 
county will be ready to drop stamps. Fine head- 
way is being made and everything is now under 
cover. The building is complete and the win- 
dows are being put in. All of the machinery is 
inside and nearly in position. It will be but a 
matter of a week or so before the four new 
Johnston concentrators .arrive, and they will be 
installed as soon as they arrive on the ground. 
The Oustomah will be able to handle consider- 
ably more ore than with the mill that was burned 
down. 



Standard to Construct 
New Pipe Line 

It is authentically reported that the Standard 
Oil Co. will immediately commence the con- 
struction of an eight-inch pipe line between Point 
Richmond and Mendota. This will make two 
lines of this size between the above mentioned 
points — the first one extending on to Bakersfield. 
The reason given for the construction of this 
second line is that the Standard will shortly com- 
mence piping oil from Bakersfield, using its orig- 
inal Point Richmond-Bakersfield line to its full 
capacity. This would leave no line for its Coal- 
inga purchases now amounting close to 17,000 
barrels daily. The Standard has two branch 
pipe lines from Coalinga to Mendota and it has 
formerly been possible to make use of the Men- 
dota-Point Richmond end of its eight-inch line for 
the transportation of Coalinga oil. 

The construction of a second eight-inch line 
indicates very positively that the Standard Oil 
Co. will use its Bakersfield-Point Richmond line 
exclusively for Bakersfield oil and that it will not 
decrease its receipts in Coalinga. The theory gen- 
erally entertained on the subject is that a corru- 
gated line — similar to the one being constructed 
by the Southern Pacific Railway Co. at Bakers- 
field — will be laid between Mendota and Point 
Richmond and that it will be connected with the 
Bakersfield line at Mendota, leaving the north 
end of the present line for the' transportation of 
Coalinga oil as at present. Then, if the corru- 
gated system proves a success on a long distance 
run, the Bakersfield end of the line will be re- 
placed with it. 

The general activity on the part of the several 
marketers of oil is very encouraging to the pro- 
ducer, who is nearly tired of waiting for an im- 
provement. It is confidently believed that with 
the starting up of operations over the Standard's 
long idle pipe line a more ready market will be 
afforded for Kern River oil, if not a slight im- 
provement in prices at the wells. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



An Interview with J. E. Kerr, a Business Man of per ton. The ledge is a big blanket Ledge that 



this City, who has Large Mining Interests in 
the Several Camps of Nevada 



pitches under the hill and mining engineers who 
have examined the property for the company state 
that it has every characteristic of permanency. It 
would take a generation to mill even a part of the 
ore on this property. 

"This big ledge not only passes through the 
Bullfrog Extension, as shown by the workings on 
that property, ami the Original Bullfrog, but has 
been found on the west in the West End Exten- 
sion, which is a splendid property. In fact, on 



The editor of the PACIFIC On. Reporter call- mine the world has ever known when the same 
ed at the office of Mr. Kerr, in the RialtO Build- amount of development work is taken into con- 
ing, and asked for his opinion of Nevada, as .Mr. Slderation. For a time during the summer the 
Kerr had just returned from an extended trip Original Mountain seemed rather quiet, but now 
on mining business. Among other things, Mr. there is more activity there than in any other 
Kerr, in speaking of the situation, had the fol- part of the camp. By Original Mountain 1 
lowing to say: mean the first discovery made by Short) Harris 

-What impresses the practical business man and the property now known as the Original the little fract!on ^"6 hct "« >n these Properties, 

who goes into the mining camps of Southern Ne- Bullfrog. A few days ago the, were about ready orc is bein 6 taken ollt fram a de P th oi 35 *> 50 

vada, especially if he has been there a number ot to start up a very complete hoisting plant. You feet that sho "' s ■«* values ° f * 500 to $2700. 

ask why that stock hasso fallen off in price during Thcre is great activity on Original Mountain 

the past few months. If you would examine the and sevcral bi S mines will - be developed. I have 

mine you would not ask the question. It has had backed mv faith and J ud g m ent in Bullfrog by the 

about one-half dozen different bosses within the P urchase oi much property and also own a great 

last year and each one seems to have had ideas of deal of P ro Perty at Goldfield. 
his own, hence there has been no uniform plan ot "By the way, Goldfield is not getting half a 

development. Well posted men in the camp say show. It is a wonderful camp, with many won- 

that it was unfortunate, as it is unquestionably a derful mines, but some of them are being handled 

great property and from now on will be handled D y men wno are congenially handicapped, 

impressed with the magnitude of the growth of on a different basis. Further, some of the men who are the controlling 

this town of the desert in the space of a year- "The property lying north, east and south of factors in the bi S mines ar « wholl y lackin S in 

well graded streets which are well lighted ; ample the Original I purchased about a year ago and commercial training and executive ability. Some 

water facilities; good hotels, banks, stores, and incorporated the Bullfrog Extension, in which I Properties there of mighty magnitude are lying 



times within the last year or two, is the vast 
amount of money that is being spent. Take Bull- 
frog as an illustration. I was there a little over 
a year ago, about the time the outside world had 
learned that a great gold discovery had been made 
in some indefinite spot in Nevada that had been 
christened Bullfrog. When I went in there at 
that time it was a fearfully hard trip and there 
were only a few scattering tents. Now one is 



all the conveniences of a modern city. 

"There are many such towns in the Bullfrog 
District already. The cost of supplies and ma- 
terials for the mines as well as the food products, 
including cost of freight into the camp, represents 
an investment of several millions of dollars. The 
last of November, I was informed that there were 
320 union miners working every day. It was es- 
timated that there were probably an equal num- 
ber scattered throughout the district, working in 
the various mines, who did not belong to the 
union. 

"The town of Bullfrog seems quiet, but it is 
the quietness that comes with the better class of 
citizens who have money to invest in the mines 
and who are coming as representatives of com- 
panies and are there for business. The scallawag 
element is not at all numerous at the present time, 
though they were quite plentiful only a few 
months ago. Bullfrog has this drawback. In 
the summer it is as hot as hell or hotter. During 
the winter they have about nine kinds of climate 
in twenty-four hours. It is a hard place to live 
in, but the gold is there and there is lots of it. 

"There are a number of properties on Bonanza 
Mountain that are rapidly developing into great 
mines. The Gibraltar is one of these. I do not 
select this for any particular reason except as an 
illustration, as it is being handled in a thoroughly 
practical way. Ladd Mountain will "make 
good." Montgomery Mountain has the greatest 



am largely interested and I am frank in saying 
that I believe it is developing into the greatest 
mine of the camp, with the exception of the Mont- 
gomery Shoshone. It has a solid, clearly defined 
ledge of over 42 feet, carrying streaks, of very 
high grade ore and the values are increasing with 
depth. On behalf of the company I have just 
made expenditure of several thousand dollars for 
a very complete hoisting equipment, also the con- 
struction of a number of buildings on the prop- 
erty. Shaft No. 2 is already showing up splen- 
didly. It is located only a few feet from the north 
side line of the Original Bullfrog and the same 
ledge will be struck at about 90 feet. I have al- 
ready had assays from this shaft better than $126 



almost dormant, when they should be turning out 
hundreds of thousands of dollars every month. 
A mining engineer of unquestioned ability and 
reputation, whom I would not care to quote in 
this interview, told me privately that he knew 
one mine that had enough ore in it to keep a 
100-stamp mill going for twenty years. Many 
of the mine owners are putting up the convenient 
complaint of the overcharge made by the railroads 
for shipping out the ore. It is more or less of a 
bluff in stock manipulation. 

"More mills should be at work to handle the 
oxidized ores which can be worked at a handsome 
profit on ore that will go $20 or more, as illus- 



WANTED 



100 Men to join us on the right kind 
of a Mining Proposition 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 

A 10, Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



trated by the clean-up at one of the mines recent- 
ly, where $20 ore was handled at a profit of $8. 
There ought to be one thousand stamps dropping 
in Goldfield to-day. 

"One of the most important things in the camp 
is the recent find in the Florence mine of sulphide 
ores, indicating that depth and permanency are 
assured. This sulphide ore has also been found 
in other mines. The Combination mine seems to 
be the only one of the camp that is persuing an 
aggressive business policy backed up by business 
men and as a result it has been paying dividends 
for more than a year at the rate of 10 cents 
per share per month. I could name to you not 
less than six mines of this camp whose shares are 
positively worth twice what they are now selling 
for on the market. A man familiar with the 
mines and having the money, has the chance of his 
life to get in and clean up a profit of 50 to 100 
per cent on his money invested in the next year or 
two. I made that statement a year ago and 
some of my friends laughed at me and said I was 
crazy, but I bought heavily of the good stocks 
and on some of them I have already cleaned up a 
profit of 800 per cent in a year and I have not 
lost a dollar on one of them. The mining en- 
gineer I referred to a few moments ago, in dis- 
cussing the matter with me and several others, 
stated that he had every reason to believe that in 
three years not less than 5000 miners would be 
employed and there would be at least 2000 stamps 
dropping in the two camps of Goldfield and Bull- 
frog. 

"In my judgment the very greatest thing for 
these camps is the construction of the Clark road, 
building from the south to Bullfrog, also the ex- 
tension of the Tonopah road from Goldfield to 
Bullfrog and the building of a road from Austin 
to Tonopah, which will give an outlet by the way 
of the Gould's Western Pacific line now under 
construction. Another railroad project of which 
not much is heard is the one that will probably 
be built at an early date from Mina, the terminus 
of the Broad Gauge and Tonopah Road, in an 
almost due westerly direction to Carters in 
Tuolumne county, California. A feasible route 
it is said can be obtained over the mountins. 
This it is reported'will be built by the Santa Fe 
in connection with the Tonopah railroad, and the 
Guggenheims, which will give a short cut to the 
trust smelters on the Coast. 

"It is unnecessary for me to say here anything 
about Tonopah, for all the world is familiar with 
its wonderful mines. Godless, waterless, desert- 
cursed Nevada is redeemed by the law of com- 
pensation and she is and will continue to surbUY 
pensation and she is surprising the world, and will 
continue to do so for many years to come, by her 
wonderful production of minerals." 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 




Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets. 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Gal, 




WM. WALLACE E. W. CHAR1.ESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHABL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Ti.i and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, W% A W% Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, m~ /Ll K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I Vt U PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 



<^>m&k^ 




r^ANV4£A£AC J-T-Y T 



"' : *~'. rftfcfBrfr^ 1 ' ' 



n ciTY.jipiLCfnAnTRKd 

HIO. 



^JXPS^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



VSS1 SSM1 \ I NOTIQ . 

Arline Oil Company, ■ corporation; principal 
place of business San Francisco; location nt prop- 
erty, Fresno County. California. 

■;cc is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 18th day of November, 
an assessment of two cents pet share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately to J. \V. Pauson, Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 501 l'arrott 
Building. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 28th da] of Decem- 
ber. 1105, will he delinquent and advertised tor 
sale at public auction, and, unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on the 20th day of 
January, 1906, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

J. W. Pauson, Secretary 

Levied Nov. IS. 1005. 

Delinquent Dec. 28. 1905. 

Sale January 20, 1906. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 
THE PITTSBURG OIL COMPANY. 
Location of principal place of business, San 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Coal- 
injia. Fresno county, California. 

NOTICE — There is delinquent on the fid- 
lowing described stock for assessment No. 2, 
levied on the 23d day of October, A. D. 1905, 
the several amounts set opposite the names of the 
respective shareholders, as follows : 
No. No. 

Name — Cert. Shares. Amt. 

J. M. Merrell 37 1500 $60.00 

.38 11500 60.00 

39 2000 80.00 

40 2000 80.00 

41 1000 40.00 

42 1000 40.00 

43 1000 40.00 

46 1000 40.00 

Geo. Schwinn 4 1000 40.00 

56 4000 160.00 

57 10000 400.00 

78 1000 40.00 

80 1000 40.00 

01 5000 200.00 

102 1000 40.00 

100 1000 40.00 

Mrs. M. A. Reams.. 7 5000 200.00 

O. McHenrv 26 6573 262.00 

Chas. St. Clair 34 630 25.00 

T. Wahlhaus 36 252 10.08 

T. H. T. Watkinson.. 40 5000 200.00 

50 5000 200.00 

51 2000 80.00 

52 2000 80.00 

53 500 20.00 

54 500 20.00 

H. T. Miller 03 1000 40.00 

04 1000 40.00 

05 1000 40.00 

06 1000 40.00 

07 1000 40.00 

08 1000 40.00 

F. W. Stonsland .... 00 1000 40.00 

In accordance with the law and order of the 
Hoard of Directors, made on the 23 day of Oc- 
tober, A. D. 100g, so many shares of each parcel 
of said stock as may be necessary will be sold 
at public auction at Room 30-40, Chronicle 
Building, San Francisco, California, on THURS- 
DAY, the 28th day of December, A. D. 1005, 
at 11 o'clock A. M., to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment thereon, together with the cost of ad- 
vertising and the expenses of sale. 

M. J. LAYMANCE, Secretary. 
Office, Rooms 30-40 Chronicle Building, San 
Francisco, California. 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Toil, I Holm Co., Aiuytmod ChcmllU) 

P. O. Box S27 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchass of Mlnsa and Prospects 
References on application 



MAPS 

The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



318 Pine Street 



San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at -$1.00 per share. — Standing price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will soon be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be followed bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 02c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1022, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1042. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 



W. E. BARNARD. 



746 Tenth St, 



Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 10 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1006. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



SAN FRANCISCO STOCK AND OIL EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the California 
Stock and Oil Exchange in the formal sessions 
for the week ending Wednesday, December 6th, 
1905: 

Associated Oil Co.— 

1 ,061 shares at 56 

2,000 shares at 57 

Claremont — 

1 ,250 shares at 1:15, 

Forty — 

1,000 shares at : .45 

Home — 

400 shares at 45 

130 shares at 46 

475 shares at 47 

Linda Vista — 

1,000 shares at 13 

Oil City Petroleum — 

500 shares at 74 

Piedmont — 

1.000 shares at .06 

Twenty-Eight — 

100 shares at 7.50 

150 shares at 7.75 

Union — 

10 shares at 165.00 

Following are the latest quotations for stocks 

of oil companies listed on the California Stock 

and Oil Exchange: 

Bid. Asked. 
Alma 25 .50 



Arline 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. , 
California Standard 



.05 
.56 
.40 

Caribou 6 . 75 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude New 07 

Claremont 1.10 

Forty 45 

Four 30 

Giant 50 

Hanford 190.00 

Home . ' 45 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 16 

Junction 

Kern 13.50 

Kern (New) 09 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 12 

McKittrick 10 

Monarch of Arizona 13 

Monte Crista 75 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum 73 

Peerless 7 . 00 

Radium 15 

Piedmont 05 

Reed Crude 24 

Senator 1 . 60 

Sovereign 19 

Sterling 1.25 

Superior . . . . : 05 

Thirty-Three 5.00 

Toltec 60 

Twentv-Eight 7.25 

Union 162.50 

Wabash 30 

West Shore 1.50 

Wolverine 35 



.40 
.10 
.57 
.42 
7.25 



1.15 
.48 
.35 



.48- 
.20 
16.00 
.18 
.20 

.12 

10.00 



.12 
.15 
.85 
.05 
.75 
9.00 

"!07 



.25 
!66 



8.25 

170.00 

.39 

1.65 

1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal, 

Telephone Main 1553 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX ™ 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULB 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leal*. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern BIdg., 
Chicago, Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



Prime loom 



none Main 5961 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, Ji.oo. 



S15-317-3I9-32I-323 

Pine St,. S. F. 



Open Erenings 
Music Sundays 



•••Will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MT1 CO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



17 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

IIO Montgomery Street 



Brancbes: 



Portland 



Los AnuEI.es 



Seattle 





Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

are perfect in every respect. The sportsman is never 
clisiii'p.iiritcd in the working ofhis jjun if it's a STEV- 
ENS — they are safe, strung, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

We will send you our valuable 140-pncc book, tell- 
ing all about STEVENS arms, shooting, hunting. 
Dotes on the proper care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FKKE PUZZLE! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, on receipt of catalog price. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 

P. O. Bos 4093. 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS., U.S. A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for thr pro- 
motion of any legitimate ptoposl- 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patetut or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 



TO 



THE 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prntzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. ZELLERfiACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry the L*rgen stock. Oar prices ere 
Equitable. 

Tel. Main. 1188. 



PATENT S — United States and 

■——■—»■—— Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 
of machine for oil and gas works. It , .___ ... . .. . . 

mounted upon trucks separate. . '*■ tests . ran 9 e from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools. Reamers, Sand Pumps* 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

liarron, Rickard & McCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



" ASPHALTAGE" 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



-MALTHA- 



RAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE = CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 

"When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describes 
California and the great West so 
well; none is mori beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers ssll it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCAL F EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 



California Engineers Supply Co., 



Phone James 7116 



315 California St., 

San Francisco, CaL 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, SURVEYS 

Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases; Salts; Clay 

Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
asd inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SJUV FRANCISCO 





s^\ > _ 



d) 



This Paper not > 
to be taken from 

t ! ^ >-• ' ♦ » ♦ - 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



A.LESCHEN &S0NS ROPE CO. 

920-932 NORTH FIRST ST. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



BRANCH OFFICES S WAREHOUSED: 
NEW YORK ■• CHICAGO •• DENVER. 



WIRE ROPE LESCHEN'S 

OF every DRILLING CABLES a* SAND LINES, 

DESCRIPTION. a^°CASING A H p TUBING LINES. 




WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean' 
ing out, pumping, pull' 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



Pacific 



For Prices and Particulars Apply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 

Agent ------- 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, December 16, 1905 



Number 7 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. . . 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1.50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 
Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

COALINGA. 

Price per barrel. 
22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. . 22j^ 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 

25 deg., or better - 22% 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $1-68 

Pennsylvania 1-58 

Second Sand 1-38 

Corning l-l" 

Newcastle 1.35 

Cabell 1-18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 30 

Canada 1.34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30y 2 gravity 40 

30V 2 to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 3iy> gravity 46 

3iy 2 to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 

TEXAS 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy 32 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop - < < . 45 



\ prosperous oil man of this city recently 
called upon one of our subscribers and re- 
quested the loan of his copy of The Pacific 
( HI Reporter. "Why don't you subscribe for 
the journal," said the subscriber, "it is well 
worth the money and I know that during 
these dull times it deserves whatever sup- 
port those who have prospered in the oil 
business can give it?" "Ob I" replied the bor- 
rower, "the Pacific Oil Reporter is published 
by the Standard Oil Company, and 1 
wouldn't give it my support." There is no 
way an ignoramus can show his stupidity in 
such an elegant manner as by bis ignorance 
of the topic at hand. We do not for a mo- 
ment suppose that the ilustrious gentleman 
in question would wilfully misrepresent 
facts. He simply lacks that conception of 
things which allows the man of ordinary in- 
telligence to draw a correct conclusion. Per- 
haps he judges from his own instincts in the 
matter and knows that no oil publication 
could thrive on the support the few intelli- 
gent oil men in this State would ordinarily 
give it. It is to the loyalty of these few 
that we are enabled to thrive and no thanks 
to the general run of oil operators. It would 
be silly to deny the many stupid charges 
made against us. Those who read The Pa- 
cific Oil Reporter know where we stand and 
those readers represent the intelligent oil 
man of the day. 



With oil bringing 40 cents at Batson and 
Humble, 45 cents at Sour Lake and 50 to 
52 cents at Spindletop, Southeast Texas 
operators have, been stimulated to greater 
activity in going after new production. '1 he 
result shows in the summary of field opera- 
t i ons — 76 wells drilling on November 30, 
against 44 drilling on October 31. 

That Humble is the favorite district in the 
pursuit of new production is shown by the 
records. Thirteen wells were drilling in this 
field on October 31 and on November 30 the 
number had been increased to 37— a clear 
gain of 24. All the other Texas districts 
show marked activity compared with the 
dull months of the late summer. 

Conditions at Jennings, the prolific Louis- 
iana field, which boasts two wells that have 
produced more than 2,000,000 barrels each — 
the Wilkins No. 2 and the Evangeline No. 
1— have not changed materially, but five new 
derricks are up in that territory and by the 
middle of this month things will be hum- 
ming over there. Jennings production on 
November 30 was 25,850 barrels, an increase 
over the record of October 31 of 676 bar- 
rels. 

The number of wells completed in Texas- 



Louisiana districts' in November was 30, be- 

ing exactly the same as tin- 1 Ictober record. 
New derricks up on November 30 numbered 
18, again the same as the figures for the 
month before. 

The gross output of all the fields on No- 
vember 30 was 75,516 barrels, against 78,040 
barrels on October 31, a decrease of 2,524 
barrels. For the month the total yield is 
put at 2,305,600 barrels, against 2,475,810 
barrels in October, a decrease of 170,000 
barrels. 

Rail shipments of Texas oil in November 
amounted to 533,891 barrels, against 785,- 
146 barrels in October, and the port move- 
ment of crude oil was 431,654 barrels, 
against 526,450 barrels in October. 

Jennings rail shipments increased from 
470,302 barrels in October, to 544.014 barrels 
in November. Fully one-fourth of the oil 
shipped by rail from Jennings came to the 
Beaumont district, where it was unloaded 
into the tanks of the pipe line companies. 
The movement of Jennings oil by pipe line 
and barge to the Mississippi River increased 
from 175,000 barrels in October, to 191,000 
barrels in November. 

The gross movement and consumption of 
Texas-Louisiana oil in November was 2,- 
360,599 barrels against 2,616,898 barrels in 
October. While there was an apparent 
shortage in the Texas-Louisiana districts in 
October, the heavy movement of Jennings 
oil to Beaumont for re-shipment made it a 
question whether there was an actual short- 
age. Allowing for an increased movement 
to Beaumont from Jennings in November, 
it would appear that instead of a shortage 
last month there was a surplus of probably 
100,000 barrels. 

Among the prospective fields, Hoskins 
Mound is claiming principal attention. The 
well near Rockland, seventy-two miles north 
of Beaumont, and the well drilling on the 
east side of the Trinity River below Liberty, 
are among the promising prospects that arc 
being watched. 

Prices were not changed in November 
after the posting of new quotations on the 
second of the month. Contract oil this 
month is bringing 50 to 52 cents on Spindle- 
top, 43 to 45 cents at Sour Lake, 40 cents 
at Batson and 40 cents at Humble. 

Following is the summary of the opera- 
tions in the Corsicana district for the month 
of November : Wells completed, 1 1 ; wells 
drilling, 4; rigs up, l; wells abandoned, 4; 
wells dry, I ; wells producing, 10. — Oil In- 
vestors' Journal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



AMALGAMATED OIL COMPANY'S OIL FIELD 



Little Known, Yet Equals in Size and Production Many 
of the Important Oil Districts of the State 



If the Amalgamated Oil Company's oil of Los Angeles. In proven area it embraces 
field had been located in the State of Texas about 2200 acres, lying on the north side of 



instead of in Califronia its coming in would 
have been heralded to the world in numer- 
ous contorted reports, and the minds of the 
public would have been so burdened with 
vague tales of hundred thousand barrel gush- 
ers that a description at this time from our 
pen would be but an insipid comparison. 



a well defined anticline, which runs in an 
easterly-westerly direction for a distance of 
nearly five miles. On the extreme eastern 
end of the anticline the sand is encountered 
at a" depth of about 1300 feet and wells drill- 
ed in this section of the field have thus far 
proven to be the smaller producers. The 
sands deepen to the west, gaining in thick- 



under a well defined artesian basin. Its 
depth at this point is, in all probability, too 
great for successful exploration. 

The oil stratum is composed of Monterey 
shale and a true oil sand which is very pro- 
ductive. For . fuel purposes the oil sur- 
passes anything yet found in the State. It 
is absolutely free from sediment and water, 
no deductions whatever being made. No 
water has yet been found in the oil stratum 
and no trouble is looked for from this source. 
All the wells drilled in the deeper portion 
of the field show a tremendous gas pressure 
and it has been found expedient to finish 
them in the top of the stratum. Even in 
this case many of them have gone beyond 
control. No. I well broke loose soon 




Scene in the Amalgamated Oil Company's Oil Field near Los Angeles. 



With different conditions existing in this 
State, where oil gushers are not uncommon, 
it seems that this particular' district is the 
least known of any of the important oil fields 
of this, or any other, country. With a pro- 
duction of about 8,000 barrels daily, and a 
capacity of many times that amount ; with a 
proven area equal to many of the important 
oil fields of the State, it has practically re- 
mained unnoticed except to the companies 
which were bringing it to its present mag- 
nitude. 

Location and Formation. 
The Amalgamated Oil Company's oil field 
is located about ten miles west of the city 



ness and productivity. In wells drilled 
furtherest to the west a depth of 3150 feet 
has been reached showing the oil stratum to 
be one of the deepest in the State. The 
sands in these wells are over 700 feet in 
thickness, while the more shallow wells on 
the eastern extremity show about 300 feet 
of productive stratum. There is about a mile 
of property west of the company's most 
westerly well that is yet virgin soil. Judg- 
ing from the line of development, the thick- 
ening sands and the increasing gas pressure, 
the largest producers in the field will be 
developed on this property. Just to the 
west of the Amalgamated Oil Company's 
holdings the stratum evidently takes a dip 



after entering the oil sand and spouted 
18,000 barrels the first 24 hours, the 
oil and sand going a hundred feet over 
the top of the derrick, cutting casing head, 
crown blocks and everything that came in 
contact with it like a sand blast. This well, 
is still flowing 2,000 barrels daily. No. 24 
well, Salt Lake, spouted beyond control for 
several days and has averaged 800 barrels 
daily for ten months past. No. 32 of the 
same company was another gusher. It came 
in some four months ago and has averaged 
1,800 barrels daily since that time. Other 
wells of the company run from 100 to 400 
barrels each, although few of them have ever 
been cleaned cut since they were brought in. 



/ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Nearly all tbi I the Amalgamated 

« >il Company arc flowing ones, which brings 
the cost of production down to the very 
minimum. Many of the wells Mow from an 
eight-inch casing without packing. Com- 
paring this field with Kern River, as one is 
apt to do in making comparisons of an oil 
field, it is in ti" respect second to it except 
in present dailj production. The productive 

stratum is as thick, or thicker, the oil is of 

much better quality, and the cosl of drilling 

is very little more. 

Early History. 
As early as 1880 an immense body of nat- 
ural asphaltum or bitumen was discovered 
near the southern limits of the propertw now 
owned by the Amalgamated Oil Company, 
or near the apex of the anticline. The own- 
er of the property, a Mrs. Ida Hancock, suc- 
cessfully mined several thousand tons of the 
bituminous matter and sold it to the Los 
Angeles and Independent Railway, of which 
former Senator Jones was the principal own- 
er. It was used for fuel on the locomotives 
with good results and is said to have netted 
a good sum of money to its owner, but with 
the change in ownership the railroad adopt- 
ed other fuel. Afterwards many tons were 
mined and used for paving streets in Los 
Angeles as well as for plastering adobe 
houses. A pond of considerable size now 
marks the spot wdiere the excavations were 



made. I'rom l li is- time up to the inception 
of the present development 111'- district re- 
mained in oblivion. 

Development of the Present Field. 
In [903 the Salt lake- » >il Company, now 
owned by the Amalgamated Oil Company, 
began operations in this field — having se- 
cured practically all the territory embracing 
the recognized oil district. The early wells 
put down were the smaller producers. They 
were located in the shallowest part of the 
field and probably ran from 100 to 300 bar- 
rels each in initial production. As develop- 
ment moved to the west it was soon demon- 
strated that it was a remarkable field. Many 
of the wells started off at from 5,000 to 18,- 
000 barrels the first twenty-four hours, hold- 
ing up exceptionally well in production. 

Taking advantage of a ready market the 
first shipments were made by tank wagons 
and electric railway to Los Angeles, where 
the oil brought from 60 to 70 cents per bar- 
rel. Forty thousand barrels of wooden tank- 
age was erected, which was sufficient for 
the early operations of the company. Thus 
it was that in the spring of 1904 the Salt 
Lake Company found itself with an immense 
oil field, but with a comparatively limited 
market and very inadequate transportation 
facilities. An alliance with some one of the 
large handlers of oil was its best move and 
was soon effected. 

(Continued next week.) 



Mews from the Field 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria, Cal., Dec. 13, 1905. 

But little news to note this week in the 
field. The Union as usual leads in develop- 
ment. Some more tanks and other improve- 
ments at Orcutt are spoken of. A long 
wharf at Avila, their shipping point in San 
Luis Bay, is expected to be begun in the 
near future. They are asking the Super- 
visors for certain privileges, in return the 
Supervisors are trying to speak for a com- 
mon wharf. Strange as it may appear the 
county of San Luis Obispo and all the tribu- 
tary agricultural and oil territory of north- 
ern Santa Barbara County have not a single 
wharf or landing place at tide water in San 
Luis Bay. The county has at last voted 
bonds to erect a wharf, but it has not yet 
been begun. 

The Tort Harford wharf is owned and 
controlled by the steamship company and no 
connection can be had to it except by freight 



over their car line. The Standard and the 
Union have made arrangements whereby 
their steamers can land at Port Harford 
wharf and oil pipe connections made. The 
Government is year by year increasing the 
breakwater to the port, but it is claimed it 
is shoaiing the water and the wharf has to be 
extended. 

In the field the L T nion has struck some 
very heavy yielding wells lately. Some 
wells that start out with a 2000 barrel pro- 
duction and over in a day. As a result they 
have shut down for the present their pump- 
ing wells and will draw on their flowing 
wells for present requirements. In conse- 
quence several men have recently been dis- 
chargd. 

Of the Graciosa Oil Company's doings 
nothing need be said, as full publicity has 
been given to their intended operations. 
They have a series of fine wells of the high' 
gravity oils found in this field, and if thev 
were to refine on their premises or on the 



near by tin \ could command consider- 
able outside oil. 

The Pacific Coast Oil Co. (Standard) is 
offering a mere trifle for oil in this field not 
covered by previous higher contra 

The editor called attention in his last issue 
to the penurious prices paid for oil by the 
Satndard Oil Co. In this field 22% cenl 
only is offered at the wells for 25 to .71.. 
gravity oil. Oil that is distillable into gaso- 
line, distillate and coal oil and when these 
distillable's are abstracted the residue is a 
good fuel oil. It is used even as it is for 
fuel, only it burns away a little faster than 
heavier oils. If the oil were not under pres- 
sure and would flow readily the oil at the 
depth found could not possibly be sold at? 
these low prices. L. E. B. 



COALINGA. 



The California and New York Oil Com- 
pany's property (formerly the P. M. D. & 
O.) is looking very thrifty, their water 
plant a success, their improved boiler plant 
doing first-class ; No. 1 the "same old girl ;" 
No. 2 still improving and No. 3 drilling. 
Surely this looks like successful manage- 
ment. 

The California Monarch Oil Company's 
well No. 1 came in again on the 6th inst. 
They had cleaned her out to bottom; the 
tools were out and she had "the right of 
way" when she swung into action at 1 a. m. 
with a load of gas whose column reached 
the top of the derrick. Gradually the oil 
commenced to come in with the gas; at 6 
p. m. she was doing better than 1000 barrels 
per day. A mass of spray was carried by 
the wind over the hillside. They are sav- 
ing about two-thirds of the oil when the 
wind blows. When calm they save nearly 
all. It is expected she will quiet down after 
some of the gas is worked off, when they 
will get her under control. A very inter- 
esting sight. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



A new steel vessel, to be known as Barge 
No. 4, is under construction at Point Rich- 
mond, and is to be launched in about two 
weeks. It will have a capacity for 2000 bar- 
rels of oil in bulk. The boat is to be fur- 
nished with a motive power of two gas en- 
gines of 125 horsepower each. It will be 
used for transporting oil to up-river points. 

Hail's No. 16, Fullerton oil field, is down 
nearly 600 feet, with I2 t : .-inch casing. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The oil industry of Texas has gotten down 
to a safe and sane basis, and there is little 
jeopardy in the undertaking of the present 
day operator. The prices now are consider- 
ed very satisfactory, though there is always 
a bullish element in all fields who object to 
the existing order of things and wait for a 
rise before selling. With Spindle Top 
selling on contract at 50 cents and other 
fields in proportion, it begins to look as if 
the business was on a pretty sound basis, 
but this result has been achieved more 
through the fact that Humble is ever de- 
creasing its output and that Dayton is. slow 
in making good, than to any other factors. 
Another rise is likely to come at any time, 
for oil companies are close as clams and do 
not do any forecasting in the matter of rises. 
One never knows what the market will be 
until it uis on the board. 

Producers in the high grade oil fields of 
the country hardly know which way to turn 
to increase their production. It is easy to 
increase their holdings, but when they com- 
mence to drill they are compelled to keep 
the drill moving all the time, and they are 
unable to keep their demand up to what it 
should be. The daily production is falling 
off very rapidly in the fields comprising 
southern New York, Pennsylvania, West 
Virginia, southeastern Ohio, northwest Ohio 
and Indiana. The Kentucky field alone is 
increasing its daily output and stands a 
chance of being one of the leading fields of 
the country within a very few years. The 
Illinois field, although close to 300 wells 
have been drilled, is yet an unknown quan- 
tity. The fields of Kansas, Indian Territory 
and Oklahoma are not up to what was ex- 
pected of them, hence the trade is more than 
puzzled to know where to reach out. Wy- 
oming is known to contain oil in small quan- 
tities, but like Utah and Idaho is not ripe to 
be opened up as yet, owing to there being 
no facilities to handle the crude should it be 
found in large quantities. 

The Canadian oil fields of Ontario are not 
equal to the demand of the Dominion alone, 
and the refiners over there have been com- 
pelled to come to the United States to secure 
the crude to keep their refineries running, al- 
though Western Canada is known to con- 
tain oil in large quantities, but owing to the 
heavy expense of getting the crude to the re- 
fineries, the oil can be bought much cheaper 
in the Ohio field, as the freight haul is much 
less and again there is no duty on the crude 
product. 

Columbia Oil Company of Fullerton is 



more than 200 feet down in its new well on 
the southeast corner of the lease adjoining 
Santa Fe's No. 47, and close to Hall's No. 
16. A light oil gusher is expected. 

On Hall's lease, C. Robb and C. B. Wil- 
son are drilling well No. 15. The hole is 
down 1500 feet with 7%-inch casing. Oil 
sand has been struck and there are good in- 
dications of a spouter. The Hall lease is 
producing over 20,000 barrels a month and 
most of the output is sold to the Union Oil 
Company and shipped to San Francisco for 
refining. One-eighth of the production is 
refined by Hall on the lease and the distillate 
and gasoline are shipped to Los Angeles in 
carload lots. 

Black Oak. 

The unwatering of the Maltman mine, 
which has now been taken over by the Black 
O. G. M. Cons., has been accomplished and 
active work in the drifts and upraise begun. 

Empire. 

Jerry Curtis, foreman of the Empire Gold 
Mines, Limited, went over to the Horse- 
shoe Bend mine last week to look at the 
property. Superintendent T. K. Code and 
Foreman Jerry Curtis of the Empire Gold 
Mines, Limited, are recognized among the 
ablest miners in the State. The managers 
of the Empire are noted for their ability in 
securing the best men in the business. 

Muchie. 
Attorney C. F. Humphrey, one of the 
largest stockholders in the Murchie Gold 
Mines in Nevada City, visited the property 
last week, and on being interviewed re- 
ported conditions the same as usual, which 
in itself is good news. 

United Tonopah and Goldfield Mines. 

The Freedom, the property of the United 
Tonopah and Goldfield Mines, is showing 
up quite well. Very nice ore was received 
from the property last week. 

Central Tonopah and Goldfield Mines. 

Central Tonopah and Goldfield Mines has 
commenced the sinking of a large working 
shaft last week on their property, situated 
almost in the heart of Tonopah. It is un- 
derstood that the shaft is to be sunk to a 
considerable depth to afford the best fa- 
cilities for handling ore. 

BULLFROG. 

The Bullfrog Extension Mining Company 
last month installed a 25-H.-P. Fairbanks 
gasoline hoist on their incline tunnel and 
they are now piling great quantities of ore 
on the dump. When this tunnel first cut 



the ledge it was only a few feet wide, but it 
has now widened out to 42 feet and is in- 
creasing as depth is cbtained. At i6o-foot 
depth an upraise was made to the surface 
of about 80 feet that will give good air in the 
mine for many months to come. In this up- 
raise the width of the ledge was proven to 
be over 42 feet wide. The hanging wall is 
prophyry and the foot wall is lime. The 
company has put heavier rails and cars in 
the tunnel and has also built blacksmith- 
shop, hoist house covering their machinery, 
also office building and comfortable winter 
quarters for the miners. 

The tunnel is being sunk on the west end 
of the Last Chance claim and runs in a 
northerly direction under the Original Bull- 
frog mountain. They are also sinking shaft 
No. 2 at the west end south side Delaware 
claim No. 2, about 1000 feet from their tun- 
nel. The shaft was started early in Novem- 
ber and it is already 83 feet deep, well tim- 
bered all the way down. A number of 
stringers have been cut showing values 
above $126 per ton. It is expected to strike 
the main ledge at about 90 to 100 feet. This 
conclusion is arrived at by the pitch of the 
ledge as shown in the workings of the Orig- 
inal Bullfrog that joins them on the south, 
also in the ledge found in the shaft of the 
Bullfrog Fraction that lies to the west. 

The Builfrog Fraction is now taking out 
some very rich ore, some of it showing free 
gold, showing assays from $300 to $2700. 
The Fraction is a very small piece of ground 
that was overlooked in the original location 
and consists of about two acres. 

The Bullfrog West Extension are sinking 
a shaft on Delaware Claim No. 1. This prop- 
erty joins the west end line of the Bullfrog 
Extension, also joins the Original Bullfrog. 
Their shaft has not yet reached the ledge 
but they have cut several stringers that 
show many colors in panning. 

The Original Bullfrog shipped in a very 
complete hoisting plant some time ago, but 
have been delayed in getting it ready by the 
lack of certain parts of their equipment, but 
it is expected to be in operation in a very 
few days. The company has had a number 

DO YOU OWN DEAD MINING 
STOCK? 

If you have any dead ones, write us the 
name of the company and how many shares 
you have and how much cash you paid for 
them. Then we will show you how to save 
your money. 

Debenture Surety Company (Inc.) 

Aio Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



of 'different superintendents and 

seem to have had any uniform plan ..r sys- 
tem of development, but it is now given out 
that the shaft which lias already reached 55 
feet in depth will be Mink several hundred 
feet and cross-cuts made and work vigor- 
ously pushed. The mine shows evidence of 
proving a great one as they have a very 
large ore dump from which any of the green 
ore gives assay values over $100. 

The Big Bullfrog, lying south of this prop- 
erty about one half a mile, has in a good 
hoist and are constantly carrying forward 
their work. This is the third hoist in use 
on the Original Mountain and a great deal 
of work is being done. 

The company known as the Original Bull- 
frog Extension, which is really not an ex- 
tension of the Original, has two well lo- 
cated claims lying north of the Bullfrog Ex- 
tension. It suspended work early in No- 
vember, apparently from lack of money. If 
this company could sink their shaft from 
300 to 400 feet in depth, they would un- 
questionably strike the big blanket ledge 
that has been found in all the adjoining 
properties. 

The Goldfrog Big C Mining Company, 
lying north of the Original Bullfrog and ad- 
joins the Bullfrog Extension on the north 
and west, have been carrying forward work 
in their tunnel. At about 150 feet, an eight- 
foot talc ledge was cut showing fair values. 
A second talc ledge was cut at 175 feet. 
This ledge is highly mineralized and shows 
fair milling values. The company will drift 
on both of these ledges and they anticipate 
striking a pay shoot of high values that is 
characteristic of the big talc ledges of Gold- 
field and Bullfrog. The company is well 
equipped with cars, track, comfortable win- 
ter quarters for the miners. This company- 
is also carrying forward work with a double 
shift of men on four claims that it owns in 
Goldfield. 

On Bonanza Mountain, lying north of the 
town of Bullfrog, splendid development 
work is going forward on a number of the 
big properties. 

The Denver is showing up remarkably 
well and has made a shipment of about 45 
tons of ore that is believed will average bet- 
ter than $500 per ton. This is particularly 
gratifying for a number of reasons and par- 
ticularly so, for it gives the lie to those who 
through their lack of competency of worse 
forfeited their bond on this property and 
tried to give the Denver, as well as the 
entire district, a black eye. The Denver is 
proving to be a big property. 



Another big mine on ibis hill 1- the Gi- 
braltar that has five distinct 1 Work 
ling forward by tunnel on a number of 
thc~<- ledges and a big cross-cut tunnel has 
been started low down on the mountain side 

that will cut these exposed ledges at right 
angles. There are a number of splendid 

rties "ii Bonanza Mountain that arc 
being vigorously developed and they are 
showing splendid values. 

The companies on Ladd Mountain are 
pushing their work and developing a num- 
ber of good properties. 

The Montgomery Shoshone on Mont- 



gomery Mountain is now generally recog- 
b) mining engineers as the greatest 
mine in the historj of the world for the 
-ante amount of development. The magni- 
tude and value; of this property is simply 
inding and the chances are very favor- 
able for opening up a number « if big mines 
closely adjoining this property. 

There are now 330 union miners constant- 
ly at work in the camp and it is estimated 
that there is almost as many more working 
who do not belong to the union. Moneyed 
men are going into the district in search of 
good properties and good investments. The 



82 PER CENT GOLD 

is the value of the seam of fabulously rich ore recently discovered in 
the Bullfrog Extension Mine. The property is known and acknowledged 
to be one of the very best of the entire Bullfrog district. The shares of 
this company is the best to buy in Bu/lfrog to-day because the mine is 
a sure wrinner. Yes! An absolutely sure winner. A great mine has 
already been developed. A prospectus, reports of engineers of national 
reputation, press notices of the greatest papers of the United States will 
prove to you that the mine is one of the greatest of the district. Write 
for this matter to-day. Don't delay. Only a small block of stock offered 
which can be placed only to a limited number of subscribers. 

A SPECIAL OFFER. 

You can secure a small block of stock to be paid for on the most 
liberal plan ever offered on-a first class stock. The money from the sale 
of this stock is to drive .the tunnel an extra 1000 feet in 1906, to further 
open up the enormous ore bodies which in the tunnel have already 
widened out to 42 feet and is a solid ledge of quartz that shows better 
values and greater width with every foot of work done. 

The work is pushed as fast as men and giant powder can do it. The 
company has the most complete hoisting plant of the Bullfrog camp 
and is piling ore on the dump every day that means dividends for years 
to come. 

Shaft No. 2, started in November, is 83 feet deep, and it has been 
sunk in less time and at less expense than any shaft on Original Moun- 
tain, and possibly the entire camp. This shaft has already struck values 
assaying over $126 per ton, and it will strike the main ledge at about 
100 feet in depth which carries values of $300 to $2700 per ton as shown 
by the ore taken from the shaft of the Bullfrog Fraction Claim and the 
Original Bullfrog, both join the Bullfrog Extension. The ore bodies 
found in the Bullfrog Fraction and the Original Bullfrog consist of a 
big blanket ledge which pitches to the north and passes directly under 
the property of the Bullfrog Extension. 

The mine is paid for and the company owns a complete hoisting 
plant, shaft house, blacksmith shop and office building all paid for. 
Work constantly going forward under capable mine management super- 
vised by one of the best known mining engineers of Nevada. 

The directorate of mining and business men of known integrity and 
ability is especially strong; the President and Secretary are well known 
bankers of San Francisco. No share holder need ever say that mining 
is a gamble if he will buy shares in such a mine as that of the Bullfrog 
Extension, that owns a mine that insures payment of dividends for years 
to come. 

Write or wire us for particulars. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A-IO, RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, * * CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



camp contains a number of first class hotels 
that would be a credit to the large cities of 
the country. 

With the completion of the Clark road 
from the south and the Tonopah road from 
the north, very much increased development 
will take place in the mines of this camp and 
it will also result in the immediate installa- 
tion of a number of mills. There would 
have been two or three mills already at work 
if it Had not been for the expense of trans- 
portation of heavy mining machinery across 
the desert. 



COAL ARRIVALS. 



J. W. Harrison, coal and metal broker, 
this city, reports that since the sailing of the 
S. S. Sierra, there have been the following 
deliveries of Colonial coal here from New- 
castle, N. S. W., namely : Balmoral, 3800 
tons ; S. S. Cape Antibes, 3540 tons ; total, 
7340 tons. There are three vessels fully due 
from Newcastle and seven vessels already 
afloat. The chartered list from Australia 
calls for twenty-four vessels, with a carrying 
capacity of about 68,000 tons. Four steam- 
ers have been chartered to carry coal to this 
port. 17,769 tons of Colonial coal were de- 
livered here last month ; for the same month 
in 1904, 29,874 tons arrived here from New- 
castle. 36,427 tons of British Columbia coal 
were delivered here last month. The coal 
deliveries at this port during the present 
year wdl be fully thirty per cent less than 
the quantity received here in 1904, this does 
not signify that our manufacturing inter- 
ests have shrunk to that extent, as the deficit 
has been more than made good by the in- 
creased consumption of fuel oil. The de- 
mand for household coals have, largely in- 
creased this month, caused principally by 
the short spell of frosty weather, hence the 
stocks on hand have been materially dimin- 
ished. The steamer cargoes recently ar- 
rived from Australia have come to a good 
market, as immediate delivery from steamer- 
side was taken by consumers at full prices. 
Wholesale prices for all grades of fuel re- 
main unchanged, British Columbia products 
dictate current values, all shipments from 
that section are now made by steamers, at 
fairly good rates of freight, provided gen- 
erous deliveries are taken from steamer- 
side on arrival here. 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Arline Oil Company, a corporation; principal 
place of business San Francisco; location of prop- 
erty, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 18th day of November, 
1905, an assessment of two cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 501 Parrott 
Building. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 28th day of Decem- 
ber, 1905, will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and, unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on the 20th day of 
January, L906, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

J. W. Pauson, Secretary. 

Levied Nov. 18, 1905. 

Delinquent Dec. 28, 1905. 

Sale January 20, 1906. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 




Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C. 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WM. WALLACE E. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




P&B 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, 
Toilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 

COALINGA, CAL. 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 




CAR TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 
of all sizes up to and including 

55,000 BARRELS 



FOR ALL. USES 

We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 

7,000 " 

8,000 " ... 

and can mount on wood or steel underframes. OH iefilierieS Complete Out Specialty 

WARREN CITY BO I LEI R WORKS 

OFFICE AND WORKS: — W ARREN, OHIO 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



DELINQl 1 N I SAL] N< >i i> 
1 HE PITTSBURG OIL COMPANY. 



Location of principal place of business, S.m 
Francisco, California. Location of works, Cod- 
ings, Fresno county, California. 

NOTICE — There is delinquent on the fol- 
lowing described stock for assessment No. - 
levied on the 23d day of October, A. D. l" 11 ^, 
the several amounts set opposite the names of the 
respective shareholders, as follows: 

\ No. 

Name — Cert. Shares. Aim. 

f. M. Merrell 37 1500 $60.00 

38 11500 

39 2000 80.00 

4ll 2000 80.00 

41 1000 40.00 

42 1000 40.IKI 

43 1000 40.00 

4o 1000 40.00 

Geo. Schwinn 4 1000 40.00 

56 4000 160.00 

^7 1(1000 400.00 

78 1000 40.00 

80 1000 40.00 

91 5000 200.00 

102 1000 40.00 

100 1000 40.00 

Mrs. M. A. Kearns.. 7 5000 200.00 

O. McHenry 26 6573 262.00 

Chas. St. Clair 34 630 25.00 

T. Wahlhaus 36 252 10.08 

J. H. T. Watkinson.. 49 5000 200.00 

50 5000 200.00 

51 2000 80.00 

52 2000 80.00 

53 500 20.00 

54 500 20.00 

H. T. Miller 93 1000 40.00 

94 1000 40.00 

95 1000 40.00 

96 1000 40.00 

97 1000 40.00 

98 1000 40.00 

F. W. Stonsland .... 99 1000 40.00 

In accordance with the law and order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 23 day of Oc- 
tober, A. D. 190g, so many shares of each parcel 
of said stock as may be necessary will be sold 
at public auction at Room 39-40, Chronicle 
Building, San Francisco, California, on THURS- 
DAY, the 28th day of December, A. D. 1905, 
at 1 1 o'clock A. M., to pay the delinquent as- 
sessment thereon, together with the cost of ad- 
vertising and the expenses of sale. 

M. J. Laymance, Secretary. 
Office, Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Building, San 

Francisco. California. 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 

formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, December 13th: 

Associated Oil Co. — 

(1,127 shares at $ .56 

352 shares at at .57 

Arline — 

500 shares at .30 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(or Todd Holm Co., AtMyert and Chcroltts) 

P. O. Box 227 
G0LDFI8LD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase of Mines and Prospect* 
References on application 



MAPS 



The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



318 Pine Street 



San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 

4000 Shares in the Famous Brookehire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stamhng price $1.25. 

ISiHHI 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will SDon be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be follow-H bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
/Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

T46 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 

FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Claremont — 

50 shares at 

300 shares at 1 

Chicago Crude — 

3,000 shares at 

Forty— 

1,200 shares at 

2,800 shares at 

100 shares at 

Home — 

400 shares at 

130 shares at 

475 shares at 

Independence — 

1,500 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

1,200 shares at 

100 shares at 

500 shares at 

Oil City Petroleum— 

500 shares at 

Radium — 

1,000 shares at 

Twenty-Eight — 

70 shares at 7 



1. 10 

I2l/ 2 

08 

43 
45 



45 
46 
47 

16 

75 

77V2 

80 

73 

15 

25 
50 
75 



200 shares at 7 

170 shares at 7 

Union Oil Co.— 

10 shares at 166.00 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 



.40 

13.50 

.09 



Bid. 

Alma 25 

Arline 25 

Apollo 05 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . . .56 

California Standard 40 

Caribou 6.75 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude New 07 

Claremont 1 . 10 

Forty 42 

Four 30 

Giant . ..' .50 

Hanford .....190.00 

Home .45 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 15 

Junction 

Kaweah 

Kern 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 12 

McKittrick 09 

Monarch of Arizona 13 

Monte Cristo 75 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum 70 

Peerless 7 . 00 

Radium 15 

Piedomnt . . 06 

Radium 10 

Reed Crude 24 

Senator 1 .60 

Shawmut 

Sovereign 19 

Sterling 1.25 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5.00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7 .00 

Union 165 .00 

Wabash 30 

West Shore 1.50 

Wolverine 35 



Asked. 
.50 
•30 
.10 
.57 
.42 
7.25 



I . I2l/ 3 

•45 " 
.35 



.48 

.20 

16.00 

.18 

.20 



. 10 
10.00 



.15 

■77V2 
.05 

•75 . 
7-50 



.07 

.20 



.40 
.25 



.06 



10.00 

167.00 

.39 

1.65 

1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 155S 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX m 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULB 



Good Second hand 

Rigs 
Oil Well Tools 

I Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago. Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



Prifile loon* 



Ptione Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



315-317-31^-321-323 

Piae St,. S. F. 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



Open ETeoiogs 

Music Sandajs 



• • 1 vl 1 Y 1 • • 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MTfi. GO. 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Const 



Coalinga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 

Sold to 

Viva Co Five ( 5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (d) 

■7 
Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 




Branches: 



Portland 



Los Anuei.es 



Seattle 




Be sure to lie properly equipped for your hunting trip. 
Usctlie "STEVENS" and have the assurance that 
your choice cannot lie improved upon, and that there 
is no possibility of your game getting away when 
sighted by our guns. Our line : 

RIFLES, PISTOLS, SHOTGUNS 




KU'-H.H 



Ask your dealer, and 
insist on our goods. If 
you cann' t obtainthem 
we will ship direct, ex- 
press prepaid, upon 
receipt of price. 



DONT FAIL to send for 
illustrated catalog. Itisa 

1 11 ... 1. of read \ reference and 
appeals toall interested in 
the grand sport of shoot- 
ing. Mailed for J cents in 
Slumps to pay postage. 



HIT THE MARK with our RIEI.E PUZZLE! This 
clever novelty will he mailed FREE upon request. 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 
P.O.B0X4093. Chicopbb Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 

Ct 




The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for th* pro- 
motion of any legitimate proposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Pat a its or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prutzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT& LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the -.argeei stock. Oar prtc*. ere 
BqniUble. 

Tel. Main. 1188. 



PATENT S — Unlted States and 

t^mm^—^mm Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 
of machine for oil and gas works. It . ,, .. .. „ „__ ... . .. , . 

mounted upon trucks separate. . '*■ tests . ran 3 e from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools. Reamers. Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Barron, Rickard & IHcCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



MALTHA 



THE- 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZ= = CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 

When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 



Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magazine describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
It is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting, 
1M QSC A I- P EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: j 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 



Phone James 7116 



California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, SURVEYS 

Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases; Salts; Clay 

Tank Caps and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 






10 t 



STATE 



Vol. 7, No. 8. 



San Francisco, Cal., December 23, 1905« Price lO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED I8S7. 



A.LESCHEN & SONS ROPE CO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



V £ 



LESCHEN 



• 



DRI LLING CABLES 
S^AND LINES, 



^CASING a^TUBINC UN 



WH?E ROPE 



*»*& 





BRANCH 


offices: 


NEW 


YORK — CH1CAOO ~> ft 


flMflri 


^^^ 


ffljifffflSBi 




I 


! - - 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION . 



^%^3 WrZ. 






- 



WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HEBRON COMPANY 



AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



W&@M0M®Z&&f®MM 

The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean- 
ing out, pumping, pull' 



■0M0. 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, December 23, 1905 



Number 8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. . . 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 .50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

COALINGA. 

Price per barrel. 
22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22j^ 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 

25 deg., or better - 22% 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $1 .68 

Pennsylvania "... 1.58 

Second Sand 1.38 

Corning 1.10 

Newcastle 1.35 

Cabell 1.18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1.34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 301/2 gravity 40 

30V 2 to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 31V? gravity 46 

3ly 2 to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 

TEXAS 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy 32 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 




HE oil producers' association 
which has been agitated for 
some weeks past is rapidly be- 
coming a reality. Already some 
one hundred names have been subscribed, 
which in many instances represent the 
names that stand foremost in integrity 
among the oil operators of the State. It is 
the intention of the new organization to take 
over the California Petroleum Miners' As- 
sociation with its envirnoments ; the resigna- 
tion of the present directorate having been 
promised. Failing in a satisfactory arrange- 
ment of this kind a separate and distinct or- 
ganization, with headquarters in San Fran- 
cisco, will be established. It is proposed 
that the Association be managed by and 
wholly in the interest of the producers. All 



the support of the Association — a body of 
several hundred men representing the inde- 
pendent producers of California. Circulars 
are being sent out from the committee 
headquarters requesting those interested to 
sign up. Some two weeks ago we published 
an editorial on "Crying Need of Statistics," 
showing where the producers of this State 
stand as compared with other oil producing 
States. It is now up to the producer to de- 
cide, and they are deciding almost unani- 
mously in favor of the Association. There 1 
is no reason why the State of California 
should be the last and least in protecting its 
oil operators. It is the producer's fault alone 
that such a condition does exist. With re- 
liable figures always at hand it will not be 
necessary to submit to the bluffing of a few 



We, the undersigned, favor the organization of an Association 
favorable to the producers' side of the question, with headquarters 
in San Francisco and will pay a membership fee of $5 and monthly 
dues of $1 for at least twelve months. 

NAME STREET NO. CITY 



Form of return card being sent out by the Oil Producers' Association. Fill in your 
name and address and mail to "Committee Headquarters, Oil Producers' Association, 
11 Montgomery St., (Space 8) San Francisco." 



important matters will be balloted by mail. 
There will be no possibility of "selling out." 
The purpose of the organization is to gather 
reliable statistics of the oil industry in Cali- 
fornia and arrange for the official publication 
thereof; to lend its aid in the enactment and 
enforcement of adequate laws providing for 
reliable reports from producers, marketers 
and shippers of petroleum oil ; to determine 
the consumption of California oil and its re- 
lation to production and the establishment 
of prices therefor. In fewer words, it is to 
be an information bureau conducted by men 
of reliability and integrity, who will exert 
their greatest efforts to show the producer 
of crude oil where he stands. Any person 
who has $100 invested should become a 
member of this organization. The Associa- 
tion will be antagonistic to no one. On the 
other hand, producer, marketer and consu- 
mer will be alike benefitted. Considerable 
enthusiasm is being shown on all sides by 
the producers. Within thirty days practi- 
cally everybody in the State directly or in- 
directly interested in the oil industry 
should have pledged themselves to 



men whose capacity for such work seems 
unlimited. "Figures won't lie, but liars can 
figure like hell," and have been figuring for 
the past three years to see how long they 
could keep the producer in ignorance of the 
industry he claimed to represent. And the 
producer has been sitting down waiting for 
some philanthropist to make him rich. But 
such work is at an end. Show the producer 
where he stands and he can take care of him- 
self. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



On Saturday, January 6th, we shall issue 
our annual special edition of the Pacific Oil 
Reporter, giving the statistics for the year 
1905 together with well written articles on 
all the oil districts of the State. This edi- 
tion will not be a "hot air" product, but one 
of reliable statistics and authentic detailed 
information which will be of interest to all 
connected with the oil industry. Advertis- 
ing rates on application. Copies of the 
edition can be procured from the office of the 
journal at 25 cents each, $15 per hundred, 
$125 per thousand. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



AMALGAMATED OIL COMPANY'S OIL FIELD 



Associated Oil Company Gets Control Securing a 
Large Additional Supply of Oil 



(Continued from last week.) 
AMALGAMATED ORGANIZED. 

During the above period of successful de- 
velopment a few of the larger stockholders 
of the Salt Lake Oil Company had bought 
up practically all of the stock held by some 
one hundred of the smaller investors. Thus 
it was that when the Associated Oil Co., 
one of the largest marketers of fuel oil in 
California, saw an opportunity to secure an 
interest in the Salt Lake field the affairs of 
the companies was in excellent shape for the 



large daily production and several steel 
tanks, with a total capacity of 400,000 bar- 
rels, were constructed. One of these is the 
largest steel tank in California, having a ca- 
pacity of 66,000 barrels. The limietd equip- 
ment of the electric railroad and the slow 
method of team transportation became in- 
adequate and a pipe line became necessary. 
The construction of the pipe line involved 
a question of considerable importance to the 
future successful development of the district. 
A line that would meet with the require- 



Company experienced a remarkable year's 
growth of business. The corporation found 
a new customer in the Southern Pacific, 
which received much of its oil from the Los 
Angeles distributing station. When the San 
Pedro, Salt Lake and Los Angeles road 
commenced to require fuel the Amalgamated 
was favored. Recently the Santa Fe, re- 
quiring an additional amount of fuel, has 
turned to the Amalgamated and loading 
racks are being constructed on a site just 
across the tracks from its initiary distribut- 
ing plant, recently purchased for the pur- 
pose. A 20,000 and a 50,000 barrel tank 
have been commenced on this additional 
property. 

ASSOCIATED SECURES CONTROL. 
It is not to be wondered at that the As- 




66,000 Barrel Tank of the Amalgamated Oil Co., the largest Steel Tank in California. 



speedy closing of the deal. The terms hav- 
ing been agreed upon the Amalgamated Oil 
Company was incorporated to acquire a por- 
tion of the capital stock of the Salt Lake Oil 
Company, which, in reality, amounted to the 
acquisition of the 2200 acres of proven 
oil "land, production, and a large ad- 
ditional market. Of the capital stock of the 
Amalgamated, the Associated Oil Company 
owned about one-half and had two repre- 
sentatives on the directorate. The transac- 
tion took place in July, 1904. Immediately 
the company commenced to reach out for 
the control of the fuel oil trade of Lower 
California. The 40,000 barrels wooden 
tankage became insufficient on account of 
the bringing in of several new wells with a 



tnents at the time might, or might not, prove 
adequate six months afterwards. After con- 
siderable debate an eight-inch line was de- 
cided upon and fortunately so for it will 
soon be needed to its full capacity. A site 
for the Los Angeles terminous was secured 
in a most advantageous position as it lies 
contiguous to both the Southern Pacific and 
Santa Fe railroad tracks. Tanks were 
erected on this property and the pipe line 
completed and the corporation settled down 
to a steady and growing business, having 
become one of the leading marketers of fuel 
oil in the State. Every department was 
strained to its greatest capacity in catering 
to a constantly increasing trade. 

With a new impetus the Amalgamated Oil 



sociated Oil Company would not sit idly by 
with only a portion of the stock of a cor- 
poration like the Amalgamated. Little sur- 
prise was therefore manifested when it was 
authentically learned that the former com- 
pany had secured the controlling interest in 
the latter, and had full representation 
on the directorate ; the retiring members be- 
ing J. D. Wood and J. E. Bamburger. It is 
said that the Associated has about nine- 
tenths of the capital stock of the Amalga- 
mated. 

The present directorate is composed of 
the following well known oil operators: 

Burton E. Green, president. 

C. A. Canfield, vice-president. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



W. S. Porter. 

B. E. Green. 

F. H. Buck. 

F. B. Henderson, general manager. 

SECOND ONLY TO ASSOCIATED. 

With the one exception of the Associated 
i hi Company the Amalgamated is the 
st producer and marketer of fuel oil in 
California. It is one of the best equipped 
and with an extension of its pipe-line sys- 
tem, now well under way. will be second to 
none. The company is producing and mar- 
keting 8.000 barrels of oil daily and when it 
is considered that this production and mar- 
ket is the result of less than three years' 
work, some idea of the rapid growth of the 
field can be grasped. Thirty-four wells have 
been developed on the property and eight 
strings of tools are running. As the pres- 
ent development is in the most productive 



part of the field the present production will 
doubtless be nearly doubled within a brief 
period of time. Owing to the |" 

Of the field it would In- poSSlb 

bring the production up to equal that of the 

Kern River field in less than a year l>\ 

mg a dozen strings of t,„:is running for that 

period of time. The company has pursued 
a wise policy of keeping the wells wide 
apart, only one will being drilled on each 
three and one-half acres. This insures tin- 
company against draining its territory and 
is also a great safeguard against losses by 
fire. The derricks are placed a uniform dis- 
tance apart, giving the field a neat appear- 
ance. The company easily secures its own 
water supply by drilling a few hundred feet, 
the water being of good quality for all pur- 
poses. 

(Concluded next week.) 



News from the Field 



SANTA MARIA. 



Special Correspondence. 

Santa Maria, Cal., Dec. 20, 1905. 

Fuel oil is demanded up in British Co- 
lumbia, right in the heart of the territory of 
the coal barons of the Pacific coast, rignt in 
the land that supplies a great part of the 
coal that is still used in California for do- 
mestic service and for foreign steamers call- 
ing at seaports. As a result of the active 
work done by the Associated and Union 
companies during the lasts ix months in 
Washington and Oregon the manufacturers 
of Canada are anxious to share in the bene- 
fits to be derived from a generous supply of 
the best and cheapest fuel on earth. 

The above remarks are taken from last 
Sunday's Los Angeles Times in its, weekly 
review of the oil industry. 

The Associated Company is not yet in the 
field here as an oil producer, though they 
will be some of these days; but the Union 
Oil -Company has the prepondering produc- 
tion over all the several producers. They 
are the only ones that have some appreci- 
able storage capacity here. And yet the 
Graciosa, Western Union, Pinal and Brook- 
shire have flowing wells in reserve, too. 
The Union, however, has the best facilities 
for distribution and is continually finding 
further outlet for its production ; that is why 
we cite the above item. The Union Oil 
Company has about twenty-five wells that 
are yielding oil in this field and several in 



the adjoining Lompoc anticline. These wells 
are very deep, and as we have before stated, 
many of them are prodigous bearers, some 
yielding 500 to 1000 barrels each per day 
and flowing out without pumping. They 
are at present using only about one-third of 
their wells, the rest being saved for future 
emergiencies, and they are still drilling on 
their three best leases, the Folsom, Hobbs 
and Fox. They have recently shut down on 
their non-flowing wells, and are taking de- 
liveries from their flowing ones. 

The Graciosa Oil Co. — This company still 
continues drilling though they are delivery 
little if any oil. They are connected with 
the large English syndicate so much spoken 
of lately, and are drilling only to have an 
accumulated amount of oil at their com- 
mand when ready for their refining propo- 
sition. 

The Pinal is going down on their No. 1 1 
well. They have scattered their wells pretty 
well throughout their territory and have a 
fine proven field. Another monthly dividend 
has been issued and they expect them to 
continue right along. 

The Brookshire Co. is delivering some oil. 
In drilling on their No. 6 well they encount- 
ered a serious fishing job and are still at it. 
Till recently the Brookshire has been sup- 
plying the Union Sugar Company's factory 
and extensive irrigation plants, but the 
LTnion Oil Company underbid them for fu- 
ture contracts. 

The Claremont Oil Co. on the Arellanes 



ranch is down close to 2000 feet. In this 
rly part of the field very deep wells 
been encountered, necessitating in sev- 
eral instances a boring of 4000 feet. 

The Palmer Oil Co. (E. E. Henderson, 
superintendent) in the easterly part of the 
is down about 1000 feet in formation 
that holds up quite well.. 

The Associated Oil Co. on the Newhall 

lease, about three miles southwest of the 

I larei I :i 3000 feet down, testing 

a new field, not very far from the Southern 

Pacific station at Casmalia. 

L. E. B. 



COALINGA. 



Special Correspondence. 

Bakersfield, Cal., Dec. 20, 1905. « 

The last month of the year does not show 
any new development work started, or con- 
templated for the new year by any of the 
companies in the Kern River field. The 
present depressed condition of the field and 
the business in general throughout the State 
gives no encouragement to owners to fur- 
ther increase their production. The ma- 
jorities of the properties in the Kern River 
field are, and for the last year have been op- 
erated, if not at an absolute loss, with but 
little or no profit to the owners. If oil com- 
panies find it impossible to make a profit at 
the present price of oil with wells already 
drilled, there is no inducement to add the 
extra cost of drilling new wells to an already 
losing proposition. 

Oil for the last week or ten days has been 
shipped from the field in quantities that 
take the entire production, an average of 
200 cars per day have been moved for some 
time past, at an average of 200 barrels to the 
car. This movement of oil shows the de- 
mand is exceeding the supply produced. The 
average daily production of the field is less 
than 40,000 barrels, and if the present move- 
ment keeps up for any length of time, the 
operators are sure the reserve oil in storage 
will have to be drawn upon to supply the 
demand for shipment. 

The following real estate transfer is of in- 
terest to the men having interests in this 

Held: 

"John Enos to Union Oil Co., $1000. 
southwest quarter of southeast quarter sec- 
tion 6, 29-28, subject to rights of way grant- 
ed." 

This, as will be seen is a deed to another 
ten acre tract of land adjacent to the 500,000 
barrel reservoir which the Union Oil Co. has 
just completed. The operators in the field 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



do not know what use the Union Oil 
Co. has for another ten acres unless it is to 
build another reservoir on, and if another 
one is built they are confident that it will 
be but a short time before the Union is in 
the market for Kern River oil. No prepar- 
ations whatever have been made so far as 
can be seen to show the Union has any in- 
tention of building any more reservoirs 
other than the purchase of this land. 

The Peerless Oil Co. is completing an- 
other power plant on the southwest quarter 
of its land. This will enable the company to 
drill up the balance of the lease without 
more power plants. 

The deep well drilled by F. J. Carman has 
been abandoned at a depth of 3200 feet. At 
this depth a flow of salt water was struck 
which seemed to do away with the theory of 



put everything around the well out of com- 
mission for several days. The flow of gas 
was so strong that rocks, sand, gravel and 
boulders were thrown hundreds of feet in 
the air and millions of feet of gas was wast- 
ed. The flow was so strong that the sand 
thrown up with the gas cut the steel drive 
head to pieces ; cut the wire rope in two be- 
fore the drillers could get it out of the way ; 
cut the temper screw to pieces and blew off 
and cut up most of the upper part of the 
derrick which is 84 feet in height, while 
mountains of sand and boulders are piled up 
around the derrick. No oil has shown up so 
so far, but Contractor J. A. Jones, who is 
putting down the well, thinks when the gas 
pressure is partially exhausted the oil will 
then commence to show up. While such gas 



places them in a position of influence which 
is reflected through their oil operations. 

The California & New York Oil Co.'s well 
No. 3 is over 200 feet deep and going nicely. 
No. 2 well is steadily improving, adding to 
the production. Well No. 1 is as regular 
as the days, a great producer. The com- 
pany has rig No. 4 up and ready for the 
driller. The report is current that this com- 
pany has some very nice contracts for its 
oil at good prices. 

E. Denicke has returned to this city from 
Massachusetts, where she has been ill for 
several months. She has resumed her du- 
ties as secretary and treasurer of the Cali- 
fornia Fortune Oil Company, one of the 
soundest of our California oil corporations. 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MINERAL OIL FROM THE PACIFIC PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE SHIPMENTS TO ALASKA 

AND HAWAII DURING OCTOBER, 1905. 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS. 

Domestic Exports from — 

Alaska 

Puget Sound 

San Diego 

San Francisco 840,000 



Mineral, Crude. Naphthas, Etc. 

Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. 

220 73 

2 2,122 522 



10 



8,500 8,243 1,370 



Illuminating. 
Gallons. Dollars. 

38,520 8,042 

367 58 

1,180 213 

32,737 4,091 



Lubricating. 



Residuum. 



Gallons. Dollars. Barrels. Dollars. 

1,395 291 



3,284 

108 

29,824 



543 

43 

9,436 



1,689 



118 



Total Domestic 840,010 

SHIPMENTS TO ALASKA. 

From Puget Sound 1,626 

From San Francisco 

SHIPMENTS TO HAWAII. 

From Los Angeles 672,000 

From San Francisco 3,461,000 



8,502 10,555 1,965 72,804 12,404 34,611 10,313 1,689 



118 



178 31,780 
990 



5,293 
102 



51,942 9,951 
537 82 



4,647 
519 



1,882 
227 



22,400 

115,388 15,980 



2,007 22,100 3,979 4,818 

Reported expressly for Pacific Oil Reporter by Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Statistics. 



1,274 



another sand underneath the shale in which pressure is no sure indication of a body of The tank barkentine Fullerton was clear- 
he had been drilling for the last 1200 feet, oil sand underneath, yet it is one of the best ed last week for Honolulu with 15,000 bar- 
Much regret is expressed that the deep sand indications possible and from the pressure rels of crude oil, in bulk, valued at $21,000, 
failed to materialize in this well. Mr. Car- if any oil is found at all it is very likely to be as its cargo. The cargo was laden at Port 
man has a good depth of sand at about 1500 in great quantities. As soon as the gas can Harford by the Union Oil Company, 
feet, and he will pump from this sand. The be controlled the drilling will be continued Oil companies listed on the California 
oil obtained in this is lighter than the aver- until the oil sand is reached, or the well is Stock and Oil Exchange have declared divi- 



age oil of the field, and is expected to make deepened as far as possible. 

as good wells as other wells of the field. 

In the hunt for the deep oil oil of very light 
gravity this sand was cased off, knowing it 
could be used in case the deep drilling 
proved unsuccessful. 



C. W. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



dends the past week as follows: Caribou, 
7 cents ; Home, 2 cents ; Oil City Petroleum, 
1 cent; Twenty-Eight, 15 cents; Union Oil, 
50 cents; United Petroleum, 80 cents. 
The Murchie mine, near Nevada city, has 



California Monarch Oil Co. — Well No. 1, 
which has had some phenomenal flows, is J us t completed the enlarging of its ditch 
The test well at McKittrick, which is be- well in hand. This company, having made and installing of a ten and six inch airline 
ing drilled by the Fearless Oil Co., on last some very advantageous contracts for its P ; P e which connects with their 14-drill corn- 
Saturday morning struck the greatest flow oil, is pushing its production. Its Nos 2, 3, pressor, recently installed. 
of gas ever found in the Kern county oil 4, 5, 6, 7, 10 and 11 are producing. No. 12 Miners have been in great demand in 
fields, at a depth between 900 and 1000 feet, was perforated a few days ago and is among Sierra county, as the Empire and Sierra 
after going through 65 feet of the very hard- those now producing. The management, Buttes are working full force and will con* 
est and stickiest of blue clay. The gas flow having large mining interests on the Coast, tinue doing so throughout the winter. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Johnnie Mining District 



Special Correspondence. 

This district is just recovering from its 
first real excitement. It escaped at the time 
its northern neighbors were undergoing the 
trying ordeal about a year ago. It remain- 
ed for two prospectors named Fred Bowlers 
and Tommy Osborne to start the ball roll- 
ing. The former was working for Los An- 
geles people, while the latter was in the em- 
ploy of Harry Ramsey and Frank Ash of 
Tonopah and Goldfield fame. Bowler was 
the original discoverer and kept his find a 
secret for several weeks until Osborne came 
upon his tracks and then the secret was let 
out. 

The new find is in the low foothills at the 
base of Spring Mountains, about seven or 
eight miles southeast of the town of Johnnie. 
Locations have already been made covering 
at least six miles in length on the formation. 
For swift work the few prospectors who 
were first on the ground made a record. The 
writer has not been on the ground yet and 
being naturally of a skeptical turn is not 
inclined to credit all the reports. The speci- 
mens brought into town and exhibited do 
not seem to warrant some of the assay re- 
turns said to have been obtained. Bowler 
and Eddards, who are partners, sent rock to 
Los Angeles that assayed as high as $917. 
Two feet of ore is said to have averaged 
$485. Another three-foot vein averaged $10. 
The ore is quite refractory. 

It is said that the ground has been run 
over for years by prospectors and was con- 
sidered unpromising. Bowler made the dis- 
covery in much the same way that Jim But- 
ler did at Tonopah — had an assay made of 
rock that was considered worthless. 

I shall write again of this find after I have 
been over the ground. 

The most important item of news from 
this camp in my estimation is the bonding of 
the Lamphear group of four claims (two 
gold and two lead) to John Y. McKane. 
This marks the advent of the Schwab syndi- 
cate into this district and is believed to be 
but the beginning of extensive operations 
of the steel magnates in Johnnie. The group 
was bonded for $50,000, the value being 



placed principally on the two lead claims, 
which are the only ones so far made in the 
district. A four-foot vein carrying an aver- 
age of about 40 per cent lead and 16 ounces 
silver is being opened up. 

A new two-story hotel is being erected in 
Johnnie to accommodate the traveling pub- 
lic. It is being constructed of adobe by Sam 
Jolly of Colorado Springs. 

Johnnie, Nev., Dec. 15, 1905. 



Benzine, Naptha and 
Gasoline 



Much confusion exists in regard to the products 
termed respectively benzine, naphtha and gasoline. 
Benzine, naphtha and gasoline may be compared 
to 94 per cent alcohol, deodorized alcohol and 
absolute alcohol. If a customer asked for abso- 
lute alcohol the pharmacist would not think of 
giving him 94 per cent alcohol in place of it, but 
the very same pharmacist would have no hesita- 
tion about dispensing benzine for gasoline. Of 
course, he might make the argument that gasoline 
was too explosive and too highly inflammable, and 
therefore too dangerous to use. The customer, 
however, ought to be told these facts and warned 
not to use it in a room in which a light is burn- 
ing. For cleansing purposes it is best to use it 
outdoors. In addition, a red danger label ought 
to be attached to the container. 

Let us consider for a moment the difference 
between benzine, naphtha and gasoline. When 
crude oil is subjected to fractional distillation 
the very lightest hydrocarbons distil over first, the 
product being called gasoline. The next distillate, 
of a heavier specific gravity, is naphtha, and the 
next heavier is benzine, the last and heaviest be- 
ing kerosene. 

The specific gravity of these liquids is ordi- 
narily taken with a Baume hydrometer for liquids 



lighter than water, or what is called a coal oil 
hydrometer. It is graduated from 10 degrees at 
bottom of the stem to 100 degrees at the upper 
part. The lighter the liquid the deeper the coal 
oil hydrometer will sink into it. 

The instrument is adjusted for liquids at a 
temperature of 60 degrees F. To correct dif- 
ferences arising from a change of temperature 1 
degree Baume is added for every 10 degrees of 
temperature below 60 degrees F. For fluids at a 
temperature above 60 degrees F. 1 degree Baume 
must be substracted. 

The following is a simple method of distin- 
guishing these three hydrocarbons — namely, by 
taking the Baume degree standard. The follow- 
ing figures represent approximately standard read- 
ings : 

60 to 69 degrees B. equal benzine, usually 62 
degrees. 

70 to 79 degrees B. equal naphtha, usually 76 
degrees. 

80 to 89 degrees B. equal gasoline, usually 86 
degrees. 

It is hoped that these figures will be of service 
to the profession, especially since most of the 
reference books reveal confusion as to the differ- 
ence between benzine, naphtha and gasoline. 



PETROLEUM EXPORTS. 

The increase in the total exports during the 
first ten months of the present calendar year, as 
compared with the same period of last year, 
amounts to 158,434,000 gallons, certainly no in- 
significant amount, the total for the past ten 
months amounting to 982,273,000 gallons. Dur- 
ing the ten months period our exports of all the 
various products showed a large increase, the more 
important, of course, being in illuminating oil. 

The official statistics of export during the 
period of ten months show the amount of crude 
oil shipped to have been 86,847,000 gallons, 
which shows an increase of 5,543,000 gallons over 



DIVIDENDS 

A few shares of stock for sale in one of the strongest corporations of this State. 
The company pays monthly dividends at the rate of 60 per cent per annum on par. 
We believe these dividends will be doubled, possibly trebled, within the next year. 
Full information on application to 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A-IO, RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, * * CALIFORNIA 



> 
the amount shipped during the corresponding 
period of last year. There was an increase in the 
shipment of Texas crude of 3,406,000 gallons, 
The exports of illuminating oil reached a total of 
730,332,000 gallons, showing an increase of 
10,963,000 gallons. Of naphthas the exports 
amounted to 24,846,000 gallons, showing an in- 
crease of 7,327,000 gallons. The shipments of 
lubricating oils amounted to 88,337,000 gallons, 
which shows an increase of 18,988,000 gallons. 
The exports of residuum amounted to 51,910,000 
gallons, showing an increase of 25,612,000 gal- 
lons. 

In the following table is given the total 
amount in gallons exported during the first ten 
months of the present calendar year of the var- 
ious products, as also the exports during the cor- 
responding period of last year, and the total ex- 
ports during both periods: 

1905. 1904. 

Crude 86,847,256 81,303,974 

Refined 730,332,265 629,369,135 

Naphathas 24.846,352 17,519,105 

Lubricating 88,337,359 69,349,010 

Residuum 51,910,703 26,298,456 

Total 982,273,933 823,839,680 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



RECENT PATENTS. 

The following patents of interest to the 
oil trade, recently granted, are reported ex- 
pressly for The Pacific Oil Reporter by J. 
M. Nesbit, Patent Attorney, Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa., from whom printed copies 
may be procured for 15 cents each: 

Underreamer, W. J. Travers, Fullerton, 
CaL, 803,642. 

Coupling for well-drilling tools, E. A. 
Davidson, Stockton, CaL, assignor to Uni- 
versal Nut-Lock Co., same place, 804,185. 

Pump, J. B. Falloure and L. M. English, 
Wheeling, W. Va., 804.834. 

Pumping engine, F. W. Davis and A. W. 
King, Bradford, Pa., 805,267. 

Oil tank, C. H. Henzel, Allegheny, Pa., 
805,290. 

Coupling, S. A. Akins, 'Chanute, Kans., 
805,402. 

Pipe-tongs, H. R. Hill, Caldwell, Ohio, 
805,913. 

For Sale. — Complete Standard Oil Well 
Boring Outfit. Down to 2500 feet in very 
good condition. Apply, W. Plageman, Men- 
docino Oil Co., Yolo Mills, Northeast cor. 
Mission and Main streets. 

The Debenture Surety Company has de- 
clared and will pay its regular monthly div- 
idend (No. 29) of 5 cents per share on the 
31st day of December. It has also declared 
an extra Holiday dividend of 5 cents per 
share, both payable at the office of the com- 
pany, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets. 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 




WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARLESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARLBSWORTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, W\ A n Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, I* fll K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I VW U PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 



<^m®jk^ 




'WARrtEiSf.OHIO. 









PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 

Arline Oil Company, a corporation ; principal 
place of business San Francisco; location of prop- 
erty, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 18th day of November, 
1905, an assessment of two cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately to J. W. Pauson, Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 501 Parrott 
Building. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 2Stli day of Decem- 
ber, 1905, will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and, unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on the 20th day of 
January, 1906, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

J. W. Pauson, Secretary, 

Levied Nov. 18. 1905. 

Delinquent Dec. 28, 1905. 

Sale January 20, 1906. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

The Pittsburg Oil Company — Location of princi- 
pal place of business, San Francisco. California. 
Location of works, Coalinga, Fresno county, Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice — There is delinquent on the following 
described stock for Assessment No. 2, levied on the 
23rd day of October. A. D. 1905. the several amounts 
■set opposite the names of the respective share- 
holders, as follows: 



Name. 


\ . , Cert. 


No. Shs. 


Amt. 


J. M. Merrell 


... 37 


1,500 


.$ 60.00 




. . . 38 


1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
1000 
1,000 
1.000 
1.000 


60.00 


„ 


. . . 39 


80.00 


,, 


. , . 4 


80.00 


., 


. . . 41 


40.00 


„ 


. . . 42 


40.00 


., 


. . . 43 


40.00 




4 


40.00 


u 


... 56 


4,000 

10,000 

1,000 

1000 

5, 


160.00 


,, 




400.00 




... 78 


40.00 


„ 


... 80 


40.00 




. . 91 


200.00 


„ 


... 102 


1,000 
1,000 


40.00 


,. 


. . . 100 


40.00 


Mrs. M A. Kearns 


... 7 


5,000 


200.00 


O. McHenry 


... 26 


6,573 


262.92 


Chas. St. Clair . . . 


... 34 


630 


25.20 


J. Wahlhaus 


... 36 


252 


10.08 


J. H. T. Watkinson 


... 49 


5.000 


200.00 





... 50 


5 000 


200.00 





... 51 


2,000 


80.00 





... 52 


2,000 


80.00 


" 


... 53 


60(1 


20.00 


" 


... 54 


500 


20.00 


H. T. Miller 


... •>:: 


1.000 


40.00 


" 


... 94 


1,000 


40.00 





... 95 


1,000 


40.00 




96 


1,000 
1,000 

1,000 
1,000 


40.00 


„ 


97 


40.00 


■c 


. :in 


40.00 


F. W. Stonsland . . 


. . . . 99 


40.00 



In accordance with the law and order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 23rd day of Oc- 
tober, A. D. 1905, so many shares of each parcel of 
said stock as may be necessary will be sold at 
public auction at Rooms 39-40 Chronicle BIdg., San 
Francisco, California, on THURSDAY, the 28th day 
of December, A. D. 19nr>. nt 11 o'clock A. M. to pay 
the delinquent assessment thereon, together with 
the cost of advertising and expenses of sale. 

M. J. LATMANCE, Secretary. 

Office: Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., AsMyers and ChemltU) 

P. O. Box S27 
GOLDFIBLD, N E.VADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchas* of Mini* and Prospects 
Reference* on application 



MAPS 



The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to 810.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



318 Pine Street 



San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Standing price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will soon be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be follow -1 bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

746 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 

operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 

California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 

formal sessions held for the week ending 

Wednesday, December 20th : 

Associated — 

83 shares at 

9,609 shares at 

Forty— 

500 shares at 

Home — 

2,542 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

4,500 shares at . . . . ; 

1,000 shares at 

Oil City Petroleum— 

1,000 shares at 



•55 
•56 



■45 



•75 
■77V2 



■ 74 

Twenty-Eight— 

150 shares at 7.75 

Union Oil Co. of Cal — 

30 shares at 166 . 00 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock. and Oil Exchange: 



Bid. 



.25 

■30 
•05 

•55 
.40 



Alma 

Arline 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer.. 
California Standard .... 

Caribou 6 . 75 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude (New) .88 

Claremont 1 . 10 

Forty 43 

Four 30 

Giant 50 

Hanford 190.00 

Home 45 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 15 

Junction 

Kaweah 40 

Kern 13.50 

Kern (New) 09 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 12 

McKittrick 09 

Monarch of Arizona 13 

Monte Cristo 75 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum 73 

Peerless 6.75 

Radium 15 

Piedomnt 06 

Radium 10 

Reed Crude 24 

Senator 1 . 60 

Shawmut 

Sovereign .19 

Sterling 1 .25 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5 .00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7 . 25 

Union 165 . 00 

Wabash 30 

West Shore 1.50 

Wolverine 35 



Asked. 
.50 
•38 
.08 
•56 
.42 
7.25 



1 . 121/2 
.48 
.35 



.48 
.20 

16.00 
.18 
.20 



. 12 
10.00 

.11 
.15 

•77V2 
.05 

•75 
9.00 

.07 
.20 



.40 
.25 

!06 
6-75 

8.00 

167.00 

.39 

1.65 

1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone M«ia 16SS 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also How of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT f 



Drilling deep wells 
for OH or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX 237 — . 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULE 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

OH Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago. His. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FUL.L.Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST.," "FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKBRSFIBLD, - - CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



Private looms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays. $1.00. 



315-317-319-321-323 

Piie St,. S. F. 



Open Lvenings 
Mnsic Sundays 



• 1 • vl 1 I ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON M'Fl CO. 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SEVENTEEN [17] NEW 

L C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 

Sold to 

Viva Co Five ( 5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 

17 

Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. Sr M. ALEXANDER & CO. 




110 Montgomery Street 




Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 




Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

arc perfect in every respect. The sportsman is never 
ilisaiiju-iiniedin tlie working of his pun if it's a STEV- 
ENS — they are safe, strong, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

"We will send you our valuable 140-pape book, tell- 
ing all about STEVENS anus, shooting, hunting 1 , 
notes on the proper cire of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FREE PUZZLE! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, on receipt of catalog price. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 



P. 



. Box 



CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS., U.S.A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for trr pro 
motion ot any legitimate ptoposl 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing:. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patettj or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, interest from twe 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 



TO 



THE 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER- 



Paul W. Prntzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

analysis and refining 
tests of petroleum 
analysis of asphalt & 
fat & lubricating oils 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



rei. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



4. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

4.1b, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the largest stock. Onr price* are 
Kqul table. 

Tel. Main. 1ISS. 



PATENT S — Unlted states and 

— aeaaaaaaaaeeaaaaaaa. Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



mounted upon trucks separate. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 
of machine for oil and gas works. It sha||ow watep we|]s tQ g „ mit of 2g25 feet .„ depth> but 

motinrpd. linnn frnoks seoarate. ... ■ ■ - ■ ■ ,mn e «. _j _ i_ ^ji —_:■.. 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers. Sand Pumps* 
Spuds, etc. 
Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Barren. Rickard & IHcCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



" ASPHALTAGE' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



MALTHA 



THE 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ■ ■ ■ CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 

"When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 



Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describes 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCAL F EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 
Phone James 7116 San Francisco, Cal. 

SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 




Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases; Salts; Clay 



Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 





Vol. 7, No. 9. 



San Francisco, Cal., December 30, 1905. Price 10 Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



BRANCH OFFICES 
5 WAREHOUSES: 
N EW YORK 
CHICAGO 

DENVER. 



ESTABLISHED I8S7 



WIRE 

OF 
DESCRIPTiowl. 




A.LESCHEN &^0HS RO^E (30. 

9?0-32 K.WPST ST, St. LOU JSJrtOt?**^ 



WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LE8CHEN LINES... R. H. HEBRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean- 
ing out, pumping, pull' 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, December 30, 1905 



Number 9 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

MAMA R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. . . 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1-50 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

coalinga. 

Price per barrel. 
22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. . 22J-1 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 

25 deg., or better - 221/2 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $1 .68 

Pennsylvania 1-58 

Second Sand 1-38 

Corning 1-10 

Newcastle 1-35 

Cabell 1.18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima ■ 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy ^0 

Canada 1.34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30Vo gravity 40 

30V 2 to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 313.4 gravity 46 

3iy 2 to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 

TEXAS 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy 32 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 



The investing public is at last sitting up 
ami taking notice. The awakening lias 
come. The promoter wkh the blind pool, 
guaranteed stock ami stock upon which un- 
earned dividends arc paid, must take his 
wan- to the hopeless ignorant if he desires 
to make a sale. The average innvestor has 

had his eyes opened liy the events thai have 
transpired during the past few months in 
the realm of high finance. The public has 
learned the value of publicity and from this 
time on it is safe to say that investors will 
make the fullest investigation before in- 
vesting in any enterprise. Investments are 
not now made with the rush that marked 
financial affairs several months' ago. The 
disclosures made in the insurance tangle in 
Xew York City have affected all classes of 
investments. This is especially true in the 
matter of mining investments. The small 
investor who formerly bought stock upon 
the representations of the promoter has 
learned to use his own judgment. He must 
have facts, and the fullest facts that -can be, 
obtained. The popular idols of the mining 
investment world are without a following, 
as are the life insurance idols. The outcome 
will be a safe and sane condition of affairs 
that will give legitimate investments a much 
firmer standing among investors and make 
it much easier for the honest promoter to 
raise capital. This new condition also means 
that the promoter or company that fears the 
light of publicity, or in other words, has 
something to hide, will find the securing of 
capital a very difficult matter. It also means 
that more of the money raised will go into 
the mines and less into the pocket of the 
promoter. 



The American Mining Congress in recent 
session at El Paso, Texas, put the stamp of 
disapproval upon the mineral land hog and 
came out flatfooted for equal rights for the 
prospector and the mine owner. There was 
a resolution presented by one of Arizona's 
copper kings asking the congress to recom- 
mend to our national lawmakers that a new 
assessment law be framed. The resolution 
if carried out would make it possible for the 
owner of a mining claim to pay fifty dollars 
cash to the Government or do one hundred 
dollars' worth of work upon each claim each 



war. the owner of the ground to el -. 

which method In 1 desired to pursue. After 
a short debate the resolution was voted 
down, and justly so. ,\ measure of tins 

kind would retard the development of the 
mineral resources of the nation and would 
make it possible for the wealthy to sit in 
their offices and pay over the small sum 
of fifty dollars a claim and hold immense 
tracts of ground. 'Idle poor man would 
have to do the one hundred dollars' worth 
of labor to hold his ground as he would not 
have the cash to pay. Then again, large 
tracts of land would be unavailable to the 
prospector if the cash payment for assess- 
ment work could be made. It would also 
mean less work for the Western miner. The 
fact that the congress was almost a unit 
against this resolution speaks well for the 
make-up of that body. 



If every investor was a mind reader there 
would be no need of guardians for the in- 
vestor's pocketbook. But the sham sin- 
cerity among unscrupulous promoters and 
irrresponsible editors makes the ignorant 
investor easy prey. If the investor knew 
the real thought of the promoter and if he 
could brush by the veil of sham sincerity 
of the unscrupulous editor he would invest 
only in enterprises of true merit. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



On Saturday, January 6th, we shall issue 
our annual special edition of the Pacific Oil 
Reporter, giving the statistics for the year 
1905 together with well written articles on 
all the oil districts of the State. This edi- 
tion will not be a "hot air" product, but one 
of reliable statistics and authentic detailed 
information which will be of interest to all 
connected with the oil industry. Advertis- 
ing rates on application. Copies of the 
edition can be procured from the office of the 
journal at 25 cents each, $15 per hundred, 
$125 per thousand. 



A. Leschen & Sons Rope Company have 
just issued their new catalogue No. 26, 
which is full of interest to the rope-user. 
It is convenient in size and neat in appear- 
ance and should he in the hands of every 
one concerned in wire drilling cables or wire 
rope transmission. Copies can be procured 
free of charge by requesting same of the 
company at St. Louis. Mo. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



AMALGAMATED OIL 
COMPANY'S OIL FIELD 

(.Concluded.) 



Equipment. 

The equipment of the Amalgamted Oil 
Company consists of an eight-inch pipe line 
between its oil field and its distributing 
plant, a distance of eight miles ; two filed 
pump stations with relays of pumps, each 
set equal to a capacity of 18.000 barrels 
daily at a 500-pound pressure on the line 
which will stand a maximum pressure of 
1000 pounds ; 250,000 barrels steel and 
40.000 barrels of wooden tankage in the 
field and about 140,000 barrels steel tankage 
at its city distributing station, all full of oil 
at the present time ; a complete distributing 
station located on seven acres of its own 
property lying continguous to the tracks of 
the Southern Pacific and Santa Fe railways ; 
loading racks on both the above lines ; be- 
sides the necessary drilling apparatus for 
the development of its property ; tank 
wagons ; fire equipment, etc. Besides its 
main pipe line the company has secured a 
franchise and is laying about eight miles 
of six-inch pipe through the manufacturing 
district of the city of Los Angeles connect- 
ing with its distributing plant. As soon as 
this system shall have been completed the 
Amalgamated Oil Company will control the 
greater part of the fuel oil market of South- 
ern California. All of the business of the 
Associated Oil Company south of Tehachapi 
is now done by the Amalgamated. 

Besides the Southern Pacific, the Santa 
Fe and the San Pedro. Salt Lake and Los 
Angeles railways, which each take a large 
amount of the Amalgamated Company's 
product, the corporation has many custom- 
ers among the refiners, sugar manufacturers, 
street railways and gas companies, and the 
business is growing by leaps and bonds. 
The use of fuel oil in Southern California 
is being extended more than ever before. 
^Ye believe the company's distributing line 
through the manufacturing district is the 
first system of its kind ever installed on a 
large scale. It will enable the consumer to 
procure his fuel with the least possible 
amount of trouble. Each consumer's tanks 
will be connected with the distributing line 
and the amount of oil used will be gauged 
by a meter. Just as easy for a customer 
to get his fuel oil as his gas supply. 

The Amelgamated Oil Company is in a 
field by itself. It produces all its oil, con- 



tfols its own market and has no transporta- 
tion charges to pay. Its wells are nearly all 
flowing ones and are cheaply drilled. Own- 
ing its own equipment for geting the prod- 
uct from the field to the consumer the com- 
pany is enabled to produce and market its 
oil at the very minimum of cost. On the 
other hand it receives a very fair price for 
its entire output. 

The acquisition of the Amalgamated by 
the Associated enhances the value of both 



tin ue to purchase large quantities of oil 
from independent producers at a price as 
high as its competitors are paying, keeping 
its Amalgamated oil field as a reserve supply 
beyond its present requirements. 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria, Dec. 26, 1905. 

Recent county records show that the 
Union Oil Company have taken up their op- 
tions on their large westerly tracts of lands 




One of the Gushing Wells of the Amalgamated Oil Co., Los Angeles. 



companies. The Associated has the largest 
market for fuel oil of any company in Cali- 
fornia. With the product of the Amalga- 
mated at hand, a production that may be 
increased at will to gigantic proportions, the 
Associated has fortified itself against any 
possible shortage in other fields, as it seems 
that it is assured of a generous supply for 
many years. However, with the building 
up of a large fuel oil trade in Arizona and 



and have consummated the purchase of the 
Dutard, Point Sal and Purissima arid Jesus 
.Maria ranches. They arc in hopes that this 
westerly territory will yield the heavier 
grades of oil for fuel purposes. The oil in 
the central Santa Maria field, where most of 
the present production comes from is of the 
distillable grade, 26 to 30 deg. gravity. The 
Union is interested, as we learn, in a new 
company called the Syndicate Oil Company, 



Xevada and its alleged aggrandizement of on part of this untried field, also on the 
trade in the Orient, the company will con- Arellanes ranch, two miles west of Orcutt, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



in thi ''it ' 'il Co. In all these ber- 

thing is likclj t<> prove itself, and 
it is well thai tin- field i* being tested to 
know what there i- 

At last tin- Union « HI Company i^ begin- 
ning t" solve tin- question of water supply 
for both their wells ami tin- growing town 
•cult. The following is vouched For 
by tin- "Guadalupe Moon" as an interview 
with the head surveyor of this contemplated 
work. 

Mr. II. Dittrich was a caller Sunday. Mr. 
Dittrich has charge of the immense water 



down a little mut iooo feet and i- already 
hi some "il. This i> the shallowest oil seep 
age found in tin- field. This i^ one of the 
most promising locations to those familiar 
with the field. 

The Pennsylvania Petroleum is perhaps 
equall) promising, though of a much deeper 
type of well. They are down ah. ml 2600 
feel in nil. Recently quite an assessment 
was levied to pa) off on their land purchase. 
'The amount has already all been paid before 
delinquent time arrived, a measure that 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



California fuel "il has successfully invaded 

good Steam coal is cheap!) mined within a 
feu nidi's of the shores of the sound, in the 

neighborhood of Seattle, California fm 
has been found to he so much more economi- 
cal than coal as a steam producer in the fur- 
naces of the steamers plying ill its waters 

that the) have been converted one after 

another into oil burners. 

Puget Sound, whence formerl) California 
drew a large proportion of the coal con- 




Distributing Plant and Taukage of the Amalgamated Oil Company, Los Angeles 



works that are to be put on the Dargee shows the wisdom of the shareholders, for 



tract. An immense pumping- plant is to he 
put on this place from which water will he 
pumped through an immense pipe line to 
the Folsom Lease, about two miles from 
( Ircutt. This will supply the oil well with 
water. This will be one of the most im- 



thev are in proven territory. 

The Rice Ranch Oil Company have also 
levied an assessment, payable this month. 
They are Hearing the oil finds. 

The secretary of the Santa Maria Cham- 



mense works in Hie State. The water will ber of Commerce is preparing an annual re- 
be pumped a distance of seven miles to an stltne of the oil field for the year 1905. and 
elevation of more than 700 feel. Work on we sna ]] gj ve j t j n our n0 xt number, along 
(his great enterprise commences Friday. vritb oilier particulars of this growing field. 
The Goodwin & Tietzen Well No. 1 is L. E. B. 



sumed there for the production of steam 
before the oil measures of the upper San 
Joaquin Valley, were opened. Although 
Contracts have been let by the Oregon 
Railroad and Navigation Company to the 
Erie Heating Company, Chicago, for the 
construction of twelve oil tanks, to cost 
about $200,000. at points on the Southern 
I'acific and O. R. and X. lines between Ash- 
land and Umatilla, Oregon. Portland will 
he the center of distribution, but the largest 
tanks will he at Umatilla, the end of the run 
of the oil-burning locomotives. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The California and New York Oil Com- 
pany's well Xo. 3 is now over 450 feet. They 
cased off the boulders with 12% inch casing 
at no feet. They are now putting in a ten- 
inch drive pipe. Well No. 1 is steadily pro- 
ducing; well Xo. 2 is adding its oil to the 
production. 

The California Monarch Oil Company 
have their big gusher (well No. 1) in shape 
to control. They have ptrforted the three 
sands of well Xo. 4. The lower sand was 
perforated last month, and this has demon- 
strated the prodctiveness of each sand. 
Their Xo. 12 well is doing some 400 barrels 
of oil of about 19 gravity. This is a new 
well recently "drilled in" which has clearly 
demonstrated the value of their entire hold- 
ings in sections 31, 19, 15. Well Xo. ti 
(Maine State 8) is producing a high grade 
of oil and is steadily improving. The out- 
put of this property has increased very ma- 
terially. 

Cripple Creek, the premier gold producing 
camp of the nation, did herself proud during , 
the month of November. The output of 
gold passed the $2,000,000 mark, being some 
fifty thousand dollars on the right side of 
the ledger over and above that amount. 
Numerous experts have repeatedly predicted 
that the gold camp has seen its best days in 
the matter of production, but from the facts 
and figures given out at .the end of each 
month it would appear that ,tbe : camp has 
not yet reached its prime. Cyanide extrac- 
tion in use at the small treatment plants is 
making it possible for operators to treat the 
lower grade ores. Xew kinds of high-grade 
ore are adding materially to the smelter re- 
turns, the. most important factor in any 
camp's production record. It was only a 
few years ago that ore -with a value of less 
than one ounce of gold to the ton was con- 
sidered almost worthless. The ore had to 
be shipped over non-competing railroad 
lines to the valTeyplahts tor treatment. The 
rates for treatment were high and by the 
time the transportation and treatment 
charges were paid there was little left for 
the operator. The records for the month of 
November show that at some of the district 
cyanide plants ore with a value of from 
three to five dollars a ton was treated at a 
profit. The smelter grade averaged sixty- 
five dollars to the ton. Xo camp in the 
world is better equipped for economical 
minning operations than the Cripple Creek 
district of Colorado. This great camp leads 
in the matter of new ideas and new equip- 
ment for such operations. • 



Federal Control of Private 
Pipe Lines and Cars 



Xo less than four bills have been intro- 
duced in the House since the convening of 
the new Congress designed to provide Fed- 
eral control for pipe lines and oil tank cars. 
It is the purpose of the authors of these 
measures to so amend the interstate com- 
merce law as to bring these facilities of 
transportaion within the jurisdiction of the 
Interstate Commerce Commission by de- 
laring them to be "common carriers" within 
the meaning of the act of 1887. The subject 
is one that received some consideration dur- 
ing the last Congress, but no action was 
taken thereon and the advocates of the pro- 
posed legislation now hope to bring about 
its adoption as a result of the general agita- 



' J99h 



Stream of Oil Flowing from One of the Amal- 
gamated Oil Company's Wells, Los Angeles. 

tion for the extension of Federal control over 
the railroads of the country. 

The most important of these measures 
has been presented by Representative 
Hearst, of New York, under the title "a 
bill to supplement and amend the act en- 
titled 'An act to Regulate Commerce' ap- 
proved February 4, 1887, and the acts 
amendatory thereof and supplementary 
thereto." The text of this measure, while 
directed specifically at pipe lines, would 
also reach tank cars as being included 
among "others means of transportation for 
conveying or transporting petroleum, etc.," 
and is as follows. 

"That all persons, copartnership, joint 
stock companies and corporations owning or 
operating lines of pipe or other means of 
transportation for conveying or transport- 
ing therin petroleum, liuids, or other prod- 
ucts or property from one State or terri- 



tory of the United States, or the District 
of Columbia, to any State or territory of the 
United States or to the District of Columbia, 
or through or over any portion of the public 
domain of the United States, or over, under, 
or across the navigable streams or waters 
of the United States, or over, under, or along 
any of the military or post-roads of the 
United States, are hereby constituted and 
declared to be common carriers, and all the 
provisions, so far as applicable, of the act 
entitled 'An Act to Regulate Commerce,' ap- 
proved February 4, 1897, and of the acts 
amendatory thereof and supplemental there- 
to, shall apply to all such common carriers, 
and all such common carriers shall here- 
after be subject to the same regulation by 
the Interstate Commerce Commission as are 
common carriers owning or operating rail- 
roads. 

"Sec. 2. That the pipe lines'of every such 
common carrier shall be open for transporta- 
tion to the public use, and all persons de- 
siring to transport products to such pipe 
lines shall have the absolute right upon equal 
terms to such transportation in the order of 
application therefor, on complying with the 
general requirements of such common car- 
rier, as to the delivery for and payment of 
such transportation ; and every such com- 
mon carrier shall provide suitable and neces- 
sary receptacles for receiving all such pro- 
ducts for transportation, and for storage at 
the place of delivery until the same can rea- 
sonably be removed by the consignee, and 
shall be liable as common carriers therefor 
from the time the same is delivered for 
transportation until a reasonable time after 
the same has been transported to the place 
of consignment and ready for delivery to the 
consignee. All rates and charges of every 
description for and on account of, or in any 
manner connected with, the transportation 
cf products through such pipe lines shall (be 
fixed by sifch common carriers by general 
rules and regulations which shall be ap- 
plicable to all parties who shall transport 
any products through such pipe lines, or de- 
liver or contract to deliver products for 
transportation through such pipe lines. All 
such rules and regulations, rates tariffs, and 
charges shall be filed with the Interstate 
Commerce Commission at the time and in 
the manner in which tariff schedules of other 
common carriers are by the said act to reg- 
ulate commerce and the acts amendatory 
thereof and supplemental thereto required 
to be filed. 'AH charges made for any ser- 
vices rendered or to be rendered in the 
transportation of products through pipe 
lines and for the receiving, delivery, storage 
and handling of such property, and for all 
facilities furnished in connection with such 
transportation, shall be reasonable and just, 
and every unjust and unreasonable charge 
for such service is prohibited and declared to 
be unlawful. And it shall be unlawful for 
any such common carrier, directly or indi- 
rectly, by any concession, agreement, dis- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



crimination. <>r device, to receive, grant or 
concede any other rate or compensation 
with respect to the transportation of prod- 
ucts through such pipe lines, or for an\ ser- 
in connnection therewith, than the rate 
of compensation specified in the schedules or 
tariffs filed with the Interstate Commerce 
Commission as herein provided. 

"See. ,?. That after the expiration of sixtj 
days from and after the passage of this act 
no person, copartnership, joint stock com- 
pany, or corporation shall operate a pipe- line 
for the transportation of petroleum or other 
liquids or any product of property from one 
State or territory of the United States, or 
the District of Columbia, to any State or 
territory of the United States, pr to the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, or through or over any 
portion of the public domain of the United 
Slates. < r over, under, or across the naviga- 
ble streams or waters of the United States. 
or over, under, or along any of the military 
or post-roads of the United States, unless 
and until such person, copartnership, joint 
stock company, or corporation shall have 
riled with the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion its written acceptance of the restrictions 
and obligations 'required by this act. 

"Sec. 4. That this act shall take effect 
immediately." 

The agitation concerning the oil industry 
in Kansas has induced Representative 
Campbell of that State to bring forward a 
bill "declaring certain cars used in the trans- 
portation of articles of interstate and foreign 
commerce 'common carriers,' and prohibit- 
ing an ownership in or control over them by 
shippers." In order that the measure should 
not appear to discriminate against petroleum 
tank cars, Mr. Campbell has drawn it to in- 
clude refrigerator cars and other private 
lines, but his chief object has been to reach 
the tank car in which the petroleum is 
shipped by the owner of both the car and 
the oil. This bill provides as follows: 

"That all ventilator cars, refrigerator cars, 
oil or tank cars, and any and all cars which 
have heretofore been termed 'private cars,' 
Used in t' le transportation of any article or 
commodity of interstate or foreign com- 
merce, are hereby declared to be and are 
common carriers, and subject to all laws, 
rules and regulations regulating or affecting 
common carriers in the transportation of ar- 
ticles or commodities of interstate and. for- 
eign commerce. 

"Sec. _'. That from and after the passage 



of this ad it shall be unlawful for any rail- 
way company engaged in the business of a 
common carrier to contract with any person, 
tinn or corporation, being the producers or 
shippers of any article or commodity enter- 
ing into interstate or foreign commerce, for 
the shipment or transportation of such ar- 
ticle or commodity when such article or 
commodity is offered from shipment or 

transportation in ventilator cars, refrig- 
erator cars, tank cars, or private cars of 
any character whatsoever, owned or con- 
trolled, directly or indirectly, by such pro- 
ducers or shippers. To be a stockholder in, 
or director, or officer of any company own- 
ing or controlling such ventilator cars, re- 
frigerator cars, tank cars, or private cars of 
whatever character, shall be construed as 
having such an interest as is prohibited by 
this act. 

"Sec. 3. That any person, firm, or corpo- 
ration violating' the provisions of this act 
shall, upon conviction, be fined in a sum 
not less than $5000 and be imprisoned for a 
period of not less than thirty days. When 
a corporation has been found to be an of- 
fender under the the provisions of this act, 
all the executive officers- and agents of the 
traffic department of such corporation shall 



be deemed guilty and shall be punish) 

in this section pro\ ided, 

"Sec. 4. That this ac( --hall be in I 
and effect from and after its approval by the 

President." 

A very comprehensive measure dealing 
with this same general subject has been in- 
troduced by Representative Thomas, of 
North Carolina. This was drawn up so as 
to avoid mention of tank cars, which, how- 
ever, are embraced within the designation 
"any private freight car." Instead, how- 
ever, of limiting the control of the Federal 
status to the cars, it is extended by the 
Thomas bill to all persons or asociations 
of persons, joint stock companies, corpora- 
tions, etc., owning such cars and in opera* 
tion would doubtless prove a more drastic 
provision of law than the Campbell bill. It 
provides as follows: 

"That every person and every association 
of persons, and all joint stock companies and 
corporations, or association of such com- 
panies or corporations, owning or operating 
or owning arid operating any private freight 
car, refrigerator car, or any care or device 
for the transportation of freight of any kind, 
or for the preservation and transportation of 
any freight whatever, used in interstate com- 



DIVIDENDS 

A few shares of stock for sale in one of the strongest corporations of this State. 
The company pays monthly dividends at the rate of 60 per cent per annum on par. 
We believe these dividends will be doubled, possibly trebled, within the next year. 
Full information on application to 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A-IO, RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, * * CALIFORNIA 

We, the undersigned, favor the organization of an Association 
favorable to the producers' side of the question, with headquarters 
in San Francisco and will pay a membership fee of $5 and monthly 
.dues of $1 for at least twelve months. 

NAME STREET NO. CITY 



Form of return card being sent out by the Oil Producers' Association. Fill in your 
name and address and mail to "Committee Headquarters. Oil Producers' Association. 
ll Montgomery St., (Space 8) San Francisco." 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



merce, be. and the same are hereby made 
and declared to be common carriers and sub- 
ject to all the provisions and penalties of the 
act to regulate commerce approved Febru- 
arv 4, 1897, and all acts amendatory thereof 
and supplemental thereto. 

"Sec. 2. That the term 'transportation' as 
used in the act entitled 'An Act to regulate 
commerce' aforesaid shall include cars and 
other vehicles and all instrumentalities and 
facilities of shipment or carriage, irrespec- 
tive of ownership or of any contract, express 
or implied, for the use thereof ; and all ser- 
vices in connection with the receipt, de- 
livery, ventilation, refrigeration or icing, 
storage and handling of property trans- 
ported ; and it shall be the duty of every car- 
rier to provide and furnish such transporta- 
tion upon reasonable request therefor. All 
charges for any service rendered or to be 
rendered in the transportation of property 
as aforesaid, or in connection therewith, 
shall be just and reasonable : and every un- 
just and unreasonable charge for such ser- 
vice or anv part thereof is prohibited and 
declared to be unlawful. And the Interstate 
Commerce Commmission shall have power 
to fix just and reasonable charges and rates 
for refrigeration or icing and transportation 
of all freight carried by private car lines or 
refrigerator cars, and to enforce the same 
under the provisions of 'An Act to regulate 
commerce,' approved February 4,. 1897, and 
all acts amendatory thereof or supplemental 
thereto." 

A fourth bill drawn by Representative 
Robinson, of Arkansas, has also beeen pre- 
sented in the House. It is merely a para- 
phrase of Section 1 of the Thomas bill and 
is without the declaratory provision con- 
cerning the construction of the term "trans- 
portation" embodied in that measure. A 
similar bill was presented in the last House 
by Mr. Robinson, but did not receive any 
consideration at the hands of the House 
Committee on Interstate and Foreign. Com- 
merce, to which it was referred. 

For Sale. — Complete Standard Oil Well 
Boring Outfit. Down to 2500 feet in very 
good condition. Apply, W. Plageman, Men- 
docino Oil Co., Yolo Mills, Northeast cor. 
Mission and Main streets. 

The Debenture Surety Company has de- 
clared and will pay its regular monthly div- 
idend (No. 29) of 5 cents per share on the 
31st day of December. It has also declared 
an extra Holiday dividend of 5 cents per 
share, both payable at the office of the com- 
pany, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 




Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C. 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARi,ESWORTH 

WALLACE & GHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, W% A W% Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, I* Xl K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I VaU PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 




CAR TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



FOR ALL. USES 



We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mount on wood or steel underframes. 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 
of all sizes up to and inclnding 

55.000 BARRELS 



Oil lefineries Complete Our Specialty 



BARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE AND WORKS: — W ARRCN, OHIO 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Ml \ T NOTIQ . 

Arline Oil Company, a corporatiun ; principal 
place of business San Francisco; location of prop- 
erty, Fresno County, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the 
Directors held on the 18th day of November, 
1905, an assessment of two cents per share was 
levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, 
payable immediately to J. \V. Pauson, Secretary, 
at the office of the Company, Room 501 Parrott 
Building. Any stock upon which this assessment 
shall remain unpaid on the 28th Jay of Decem- 
ber. 1905, will be delinquent and advertised for 
sale at public auction, and, unless payment is 
made before, will be sold on the 20th day of 
January, 1906, to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with the costs of advertising and ex- 
penses of sale. 

J. W. Pauson, Secretarv. 

Levied Nov. 18, 1905. 

Delinquent Dec. 28, 1905. 

Sale January 20, 1906. 

DELINQUENT SALE NOTICE. 

The Pittsburg Oil Company — Location of princi- 
pal place of business, San Francisco. California. 
Location of works. Coalings. Fresno county. Cali- 
fornia. 

Notice — There. is delinquent on the following 
described stock for Assessment No. 2, levied on the 
23rd day of October. A. D. 1905. the several amounts 
set opposite the names of the respective share- 
holders, as follows: 

Name: No. Cert. No. Shs. Amt. 

J. M. Merrell 37 1,500 ..$60.00 

3S 1,500 60.00 

39 2,000 80.00 

40 2,000 80.00 

41 1000 40.00 

42 1,000 40.00 

43 1,000 40.00 

Geo. Schwinn 4 1.000 40.00 

56 4,000 160.00 

57 10,000 400.00 

78 1,000 40.00 

80 1000 40.00 

91 5.000 200.00 

102 1,000 40.00 

100 1,000 40.00 

Mrs. M A. Kearns 7 5.000 200.00 

O. McHenry 26 6,573 262.92 

Chas. St. Clair 34 630 25.20 

J. Wahlhaus 36 252 10.08 

J. H. T. Watkinson ... 49 5,000 200.00 

50 5 000 200.00 

51 2.00C 80.00 

52 2,000 80.00 

53 500 , 20.00 

54 500 20.00 

H. T. Miller 93 1.000 40.00 

94 1,000 40.00 

• •• 95 1,000 40.00 

96 1,000 40.00 

97 1000 40.00 

98 1,000 40.00 

F. W. Stonsland 99. 1,000 40.00 

In accordance with the law and order of the 
Board of Directors, made on the 23rd day of Oc- 
tober, A. D. 1905, so many shares of each parcel of 
said stock as may be necessary will be sold at 
public auction at Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Bldg., San 
Francisco. California, on THURSDAY, the -28th day 
of December, A. D. 1905, at 11 o'clock A. M. to pay 
the delinquent assessment thereon, together with 
the cost of advertising, and- expenses of sale. 

M. J. LATMANCE, Secretary. 
Office: Rooms 39-40 Chronicle Bldg., San Fran- 
cisco, California. 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Aswycrs and ChetnUt5) 
P. O. Box 327 



GOLDFIBLD, 



NEVADA 



Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase ot Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



MAPS 



The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Standing price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will soon be gone, when a second installment 
uill be offered at $15.00, to be folIowM bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, December 27th : 
Associated — 



99 shares at . 
100 shares at . 

Arline — 

500 shares at . 

Four — 

90 shares at . 

Independence — 

1,000 shares at . 

Monte Cristo — 

1,500 shares at . 

Oil City Petroleum- 

500 shares at . 

1,000 shares at . 



•55 
■56 

■30 

■30 
•15 

■77V-i 

.72 
•74 



Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 



Bid. 
.25 
•30 
•05 
•55 
.40 



Alma 

Arline 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. 
California Standard . . . 

Caribou 6 . 75 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude ( New) . . 08 

Claremont 1.10 

Forty 48 

Four 30 

Giant .50 

Hanford 260.00 

Home 45 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 14 

Junction 

Kaweah 40 

Kern 13. 50 

Kern (New) 09 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona 13 

jNIonte Cristo 75 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum 71 



Asked. 
.50 

•38 
.08 

■56 

.42 

7.25 



1.12% 

■50 
.35 



.12 
.09 



Peerless 
Radium 
Piedomnt . . 
Radium . . . 
Reed Crude 



6-75 

15 

.06 

.10 

.26 



Senator 1 .60 

Shawmut 

Sovereign 19 

Sterling' 1 .25 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5-00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7 . 00 

Union 162.00 

West Shore 1.50 

Wolverine 35 



.48 

.20 
16.00 

•17 
.20 



. 12 
10.00 

. 11 
.15 

.80 
.05 

■73 
9.00 

.07 
.20 
.28 

.40 
.25 

"!6<5 
6-75 

7-75 

168.00 

1.65 

1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

AH "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main I5SS 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for OH or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants lor Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX 237 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULE 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

OH Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL. TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago, Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - '- CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 



Private loom* 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317-319-321-323 

Piie St.. S F. 



Open Evenings 

Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST=CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



Coalinga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co. . ., Four (4) 



'7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 




WHEELER & WILSON MT'G.CO 

231 Sutter Street 
Son Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angelss 



Seattle 




Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

arc perfect in every respect. The sportsman is ncier 
disappointed in the working of his gun if it's a STE\ ■ 
ENS — [hey are sr:!e, strung, accurate; durable, anJ 
convenient to handle. 

AVe will send you our valu.-tMe 140-pnge book, tell- 
ing all about STEVENS amis, shooting, hunting, 
notes on the propel care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FRI'.E Pl'Z/LE! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

As!i your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, ■ n receipt of catalog pri. ■:. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 
r. 1 >. Box 4093. 

CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS., U.S.A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for thr pro- 
motion ot any legitimate pioposl- 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Patents or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. . 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prutzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel. Mint 279" San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418. 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
incidental to the trade. 

We carry the i^igeat Steele. Oar price, are 
Bcjai table. 

Tel. Main. 1188. 



PATENT S — United States and 

a-aaaaaaaaa^aaaaaae Foreign. Trade 

Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 

Pittsburg, Pa. 



Park Building, 



mounted upon trucks separate. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op* 

is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 

of machine for oil and gas works. It , „ ,, . ... .. , -.„ , . . . .. . .. 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made In Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Harron, Rickard & JHcCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



' ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



R 



FIN ED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ^ZZ= CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG. f 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



When writing 1 to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magaziue describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
It is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 

IXOjhCAI.F eucalyptus boiler compound. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 
Phone James 7116 San Francisco, Cal. 

SMITH, EMERY & CO 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 










Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases; Salts; Clay 



Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SJkJV FRANCISCO 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



LESCHENS 

DRILLING CABLES, 
SAND LINES, CASING 
.""TUBING LINESj 



A.LESCHEN &S0NS ROPECO. 

920-932 N. FIRST ST. 
ST. LOU IS, MO. 




urn 



BRANCH OFFICES'- 
NEW YORK CHICAGO 

DENVER. 



,1VMW»"* - : ,:v 



iiil 'liMiij 

I. . . .... t <i i « 



««JIHH -«irOt rT.*M..«|«iB« - ^. 



i ^'f II! iOiilll! 'illlll jl^^ii ^^:«iWi* WiiHiiiN! '.^^ : 







THE ONLY SUBMARINE OIL WELLS IN THE WORLD - — S U M M E.R LAN D , C AL . 



WE ARE AGENTS FOB 



LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HEBRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean' 
ing out, pumping, pull= 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 6, 1900 



Number IO 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

MARIA R. Winn. Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. . . 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1-50 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

coalinga. 

Price per barrel. 
22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22 x /i 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 

25 deg., or better - 22 y 2 

eastern quotations. 

Tiona $ J -68 

Pennsylvania % 

Second Sand \ 

Corning 1J 

Newcastle *-35 

Cabell L 13 

North Lima "4 

South Lima 8 ^ 

Indiana °^ 

Somerset °" 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light ° y 

Corsicana, heavv 50 

Canada 1-34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30y 2 gravity 40 

30V, to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 31 M> gravity 46 

3iy 2 to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and ove r '2 

TEXAS 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy *- 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 



California's increase iii production of mineral oils for [905 kepi well up to the 
ratio of the past four > ears. 

1 ontrary to past records, but strictly in accordance with expectations, the Kern 
River field fell off some two and a half millions of barrels and had it not been for an 
opportune increase in some of the other fields of the Stale a shortage of oil would 
have necessarily followed. As it was, however, four and a half millions of barrels 

went 1 1 ige in the field during the first part of the year. It is certain that little 

was stored during the last half of 1905 and some well posted oil men go so far as to 
positively state that stocks were called on for shipment during December. We are 
inclined to believe that little Kern River oil will go into storage during [906. 

Coalinga showed a steady gain for the year and a daily average of 22.000 barrels 
is conservative. At the beginning of the year only 12,000 to 14,000 barrels per day 
was claimed — November's production ran close to 27,000 barrels daily. Although 
ample storage facilities were at hand no oil went into stocks. The only storage in the 
field is some 30,000 barrels of sump oil of low gravity. Every barrel of oil was 
shipped from the field as rapidly as it could be gathered into the receiving tanks of 
the marketers. 

Santa Maria's increase was remarkable, being about 800 per cent over that of 
1904. This field is eavuible of an unprecedented increase in production but fortunately 
for the field and the industry in general the operating companies there arc extremely 
conservative and will not develop cheap oil. The Union Oil Company of California, 
the principal operator there, will develop its territory only to supply its own require- 
ments and it will not sell oil at a price that would have a depressing influence on the 
other fields of the State. While there will be a natural gain in the field during 190O 
the few strong corporations there will develop oil only at fair prices. 

The Amalgamated or Salt Lake field, near Los Angeles, developed some fine 
producers during 1005 which swelled the Los Angeles production to probably the 
highest mark it has ever reached even in its boom days. There will doubtless be a still 
further increase during 1906. Of the other fields of the State, little can be said of a 
general bearing on the grand total production. Each one with its production— little 
or much— helps supply a cheap fuel to turn the wheels of commerce on the Pacific- 
Coast. While the increase in the State's production during 1906 will be considerable, 
will it meet the growing demand? Let us consider its uses. 

The extended use of California fuel oil during the year just ended has been all that 
could be hoped for and it is safe to say the present production does not exceed the 
demand: nor is it likely to for, while occasional new wells are brought in with phe- 
nomenal productions, on the other hand new markets are being opened up that eats 
up that self same production and creaps up on the reserve stocks in a very encouraging 
manner. In the cities of San Francisco, ( lakland and Los Angeles more than three 
million barrels of oil was used in the manufacture of gas in the year 1906. Several 
cities of minor importance used quantities of oil for this purpose. Seventy-five per cent 
of the fuel used in the State of California is fuel oil and new installations are rapidly be- 
ing made. Nearly all the boats plying on the bay of San Francisco use oil for steam 
purposes and many of the acean wise vessels are using it with the best of results. In the 
early part of 1905 the S. S. "Nebraska" made a round trip between San Francisco 

and" New York City by. the way of the Horn, using only the initial supply d 

taken on at San Francisco. The boat broke all records for time on a like trip and 
saved many thousands of dollars in cost of fuel and wages. We have yet to hear of 
a single oil installation where the best of results have not been obtained. The South- 
ern Pacific, Santa Pe and the Salt Lake. San Pedro and Los Angeles railways are 
using several millions of barrels each per year. In fact, they are the largest consumers 
of fuel oil and have been material factors in the building up of the industry. Washing- 



pacific oil Reporter 



ton and Oregon have consumed large quantities of California fuel oil the past year, 
and many oil installations are contemplated for 1906, with a corresponding!}' increased 
demand for our product. These states formerly looked to British Columbia for their 
fuel supply (coal), but the colliery owners of that country have long since given up the 
hopeless fight against a better and cheaper fuel. 

Our interstate oil trade during 1905 has increased many fold. The. practical re- 
sults obtained from oil fuel in the smelting business has led to its general adoption in 
many of the large mines and heavy shipments to Arizona, New Mexico and Nevada 
have resulted. The demand for fuel oil for this class of business will increase rapidly 
during 1906. A considerable advance in price would not effect this branch of the 
business. 

Although possessing immense coal measures, Alaska is looking to California for a 
fuel supply, and the yearly shipments of both crude and refined oils amount to several 
millions of gallons. 

The sugar refineries in the Hawaiian Islands are Using oil fuel almost altogether. 
The few large users of coal there are being converted to the use of oil as rapidly as 
their coal contracts expire. Close competition in the sugar trade necessitates economi- 
cal manufacture and thousands of dollars are saved yearly by the use of oil in lieu of 
coal in the islands. 

Probably no more striking illustration of the superiority of oil fuel has ever been 
brought to the notice of a skeptical public than its introduction, during 1905, into Brit- 
ish Columbia, where it is used within fifty and a hundred miles of some of the large coal 
colleries there. It is being shipped in large quantities to Victoria, from which place it 
is distributed. It is probably useless to say that a fight is being waged by the collery 
owners, who, after being driven from California and seeing a major portion of their 
'Washington and Oregon trade taken from them, must suffer the humiliation of losing 
a large fuel trade in their own country, and this on points of economy alone. The 
British Columbia oil trade was opened up by the Union Oil Company of California, 
which has always been a pioneer in opening up new territory to the use of fuel oil. The 
last oil shipment of 1905 to British Columbia was 10,000 barrels of crude in the Union 
Oil Company's tank steamer "Whittier," which cleared San Francisco for Vancouver 
December 26th. Unless arbitrary duties on the importation of crude oil are put into 
effect the shipments to British Columbia during 1906 will amount to nearly half a mil- 
lion barrels. 

At the close of 1905 we find extensive markets for oil fuel being opened up in Chili 
and several of the other South American republics by the Union Oil Company. Several 
large cargoes have already been shipped to Calita Buena, Chili, for railroad use. Not 
only does oil fuel maintain its supremacy in matter of cost, but in this hot country 
stokers are held at a premium, and from this point of view alone oil is outrivaling coal. 
The large handlers of California oil are waging a sharp warfare over this South Ameri- 
can trade, and it is safe to say the people of those countries will get their oil at a very 
low price. Contracts are somewhat risk}', however, for one never knows when an ar- 
trary duty may be placed on the commodity. 

The Panama Canal and the isthmus across which it will run when completed is 
becoming a center of much interest to California oil shippers. Fuel amounting to mil- 
lions of tons must be supplied for steam use on the Panama railroad and for the great 
steam drills, dredgers and miscellaneous machinery. The Panama railroad has thus far 
burned coal and is provided with facilities for handling same. It is deleivered at tide- 
water for about $4.00 per ton. Cheap labor at hand and the expense incident to con- 
verting engines to oil burners is given as the excuse at Washington for the delay in ac- 
cepting a cheaper and better fuel — fuel oil. Probably the most unfortunate feature in the 
situation is the fact that the men in charge are inexperienced in the burning of oil fuel 
and they naturally look askance at innovations. The future isthmian oil trade depends 
largely on the action the government may take in the matter. 

Altogether it may be safely said that our export and interstate oil trade has more 
than doubled during the past year and the outlook for increased foreign and domestic 
trade in the future is very promising; in fact, so much so that new oil pools must be 
quickly discovered and the old ones rapidly developed to keep up with the demand 
attending a rapidly increasing oik consumption. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE OF CALI- 
FORNIA PRODUCTION. 

The following table, which is self ex- 
planatory, will be of interest to all con- 
nected with the oil industry. It has been 
prepared with great care and will be found 
correct; not estimated: 



.000 
000 

u"> o O O 

R cS o" d 

ji'vo o o 

00 no 



00000000000 
00000000000 
00000000000 



OOioOOOOlooNlo 
OO <N O wvo IX N 
O^ ■* N"1KO\ 

00" ""> "Si" CO M 



0000 
0000 

S" O m O O 

8, ^f d o 0" 

™h no o 

»-^vo in w 

in ix t-T 



0*0000000 
"CSOOOOOvO 

^ H} H . ^ Q. Q, o Q. 

LO CO IXCO" O" VO M 

ixvo ^- -^- oj co 

OOIOhNm 



O 
vO~ 
tx 
•st- 

00" 



OOOOinOOOOOmO 

loonOVOOOOOOmO 

co O^OO ", t> H . N "J "3 t> O O^ 

Rod" 00" of co co cR co co ixod hT 

Z, CO O ^J- Q\ »0 OJ u-)00 CM IX CO 
M -. N ^ IX CO COVO *crOO « 

Of VO M M 



OOmOOOOOioOO 

mO'-'OOOO^'-'covn 

CM K ^J H „ CO N O 10100 O 10 

8. o" VO <N Ix <* 0" ONVO" 10 tx •* 

SP O « tx^-^-lOCOOl ONOO o\ 
h 10hCO O h VOVOhhVO 

00" i-T m" 






o 
o 

CO 

tx 

Ov 



o 



■ o 

•J 






o 



cS 



u 



.2 >- tu 



. 5 M E 
. E OJ <L> 

<u ^ s 

■>PQpl, 






x3 ffl 



rt 



C3 



>^ii ~ o <u 



"JO 



■O -5 



3,5 o 3s^4;=> 5 b « "3 







Daily average for 1902.... 38,286 barrels 

Daily average for 1903.... 66,679 barrels 

Daily average for 1904.... 78,011 barrels 

Daily average for 1905.... 96,000 barrels 



Crude Oil For Vancouver. 

The tank steamer Whittier was cleared 
December 28th for Vancouver with 10,000 
barrels of crude oil in bulk, valued at $14,- 
000, as its cargfo. 



Crude Oil for Hawaii. 

The tank steamer Rosecrans sailed Jan- 
uary 5th for Honolulu with 23,000 barrels 
of crude oil, in bulk, valued at $32,200, and 
2 7S° gallons distillate, valued at $225, as its 
cargo. 

The tank steamer Marion Chilcot was 
cleared the same date for Honolulu with 
16,000 barrels of crude oil, in bulk, valued 
at $22,400, as its cargo. Both vessels were 
loaded at Monterey. 



Will Be Oil Burners. 

The steamers Buckman and Watson, re- 
cently arriving on this coast to enter the 
service of the Barneson-Hibberd Company, 
will be converted into oil burners within 
the next few weeks. Both steamers have 
lost no time in getting into the coast trade, 
and the prospect of enjoying a profitable 
trade is good. But both of these steamers 
are in the meantime to be laid up. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



LIST OF OIL CARRYING VESSELS. 



iplctc li-t of "il carrying 

for transporting i alifornia 

crude ami refined "il on the Pacific Coast at 

Union Oil Company of California. 



The Santa Maria Oil Fields 

By L. e:. BLOCHMAN, 
Secretary Santa Maria Chamber of Commerce. 



N'am< 

Cli 
Lansing tank steamer 

Washtenaw tank steamer 

Roma lank steamer 

il tank steamer 

VVhittier tank steamer 

Fullerton ship 

Santa Paula ship 



Capacity 
in gallons. 

i .-•.; 
1,155 
1,125 
; 

672 

344.400 



Total 6.984,600 



Location of the Valley. 
■^^mr* HE Santa Maria Vallej occupies 

Othe northern part of Santa I 
l>arl>.i County, 

1 on 1 the 

tin ea 1 . id ta nee of near- 

I) thirt) mil and From the San I ,uis 

1 1 1 ounty line on- the north to the low 

dividi Forms I he w <w 1 inn ws Santa 



and pased on ii favorably, and a com- 
I Angeles men was formed by 

I! aj . which, under the name of The 
Western Union Oil Co., began the 
development of this territory. Beginning 
in 1899 it was not until August, 1901, after 
a third well had been bored, that oil in pay- 

uantity was found. 

Subsequently, in 1902, several of the busi- 
men of Santa Maria, in company with 



PETROLEUM STATISTICS. 
The following table, compiled by Dr. C. T. Deane, secretary of the California Petroleum Miners' Association, shows the approxi- 
mate petroleum statistics for the year ended December 31, 1905: 

1 ffS 



5" -3 



OIL 1 >l.-'i R 

Kern River 14 

Santa Maria and Lompoc 5 

I.i s Angeles and Salt Lake 3 

Coalinga 8 

Fullerton and Urea Canyon 1 

Puente and Whittier 

Xewhall . 

Ventura 

Summerland 

Sunset 

Midway , 

McKittrick 

Sargents 



Arroyo Grande 
Halfmoon Bay 



000,000 
,300,000 
000,000 
869 000 
750,000 
960,000 
j 50,000 
350,000 

75,000 
400,000 

70,000 
720,000 

20,000 
5,000 
2,000 



r w 
i- 1 2 



10,500,000 
200,000 
128,000 

74,000 

77 760 

138,200 

4,000 

60,000 

to.400 

250.000 

5,000 

1 20,000 

9.800 



9,500,000 

4.190,000 

2,778,000 

8,946,000 

1,7^.7,760 

938,200 

104,000 

350,000 

85,400 

300,000 



0*1 






15,000,000 

1,310,000 

35O.00O 

30,000 

100,000 

160.000 
50,000 
60,000 



720,000 
29,800 



350,000 

75,000 

120,000 



5,000 
3.000 



n 

680 

73 
300 

243 

LSO 

94 

■ 52 
24(1 
120 

38 

21 
90 

5 
1 

3 



< 



6 
4.2 
20 
26 

3 



5 

1 

12 

9 
2 
6 
1 
2 

1 
4 
3 
1 
o 

4 
1 



Total 35,671,000 11,578,160 

NOTE — Field Stocks include oil in receiving tanks awaiting shipment. 



29,636,160 17,613.000 2116 123 52 



Associated Oil Company. 

Rosecrans tank steamer 

Marian Chilcatt ship 

Monterey schooner 

Santiago schooner 



966,000 
672,000 
840,000 
462,000 



1 otal 2.940,000 

Pacific Coast Oil Co. (Coastwise). 

Atlas tank steamer 850,000 

Asuncion tank steamer 950,000 

Geo. Loomis tank steamer 277,200 

Barge No. 3 tank barge 1,400,000 



Total 3,477,200 

Standard Oil Co. (Export). 

Dakota tank steamer 1,700,000 

Winnebago tank steamer 2,000,000 

Appattoche tank steamer 1.375.000 

Housatonic tank steamer 1.725.000 



Total 6,800,01 10 

Total number of vessels 19 

Total carrying capacity in gals. 20. 201.(100 
Total carrying capacity in bbls. 480,990 



Maria oil belt on the south, a distance across 
of about nine miles. • . 

The Southern Pacific Railway crosses the 
western portion of the valley, passing 
through the town of Guadalupe. In the cen- 
ter of the valley lies the main town, Santa 
Maria. The Pacific Coast Company's (nar- 
row gauge) line connects it with Orcutt. 
Los Alamos, Los Olivos and several oil 
stations between, and on the north il reaches 
to San Luis Obispo and Port Harford. 
Daily stages ply between. Santa Maria and 
Guadalupe — eight mile's apart — meeting all 
Southern Pacific trains. 

Early History of the Field. 

Up until 1901 this broad fertile valley and 
adjacent hills was noted only for grain, 
beans, cattle or butter. Of its becoming an 
oil field of renown was not dreamed of. Ex- 
perts from the interior oil belt looked at the 
territory askance. To Mr. McKay, who in- 
terested several Los Angeles men, and to 
Mr. Mulholland, a leading geologist and oil 
expert of Los Angeles, is due the first pio- 
neering in the oil fields. Mr. Win. Mulhol- 
land explored the lands of the Careaga 



three or four San Luis Obispo gentle- 
men, organized another corporation under 
the name of the Pinal Oil Co., which com- 
menced operations on the Santa Maria anti- 
cline. They soon met with such success 
that it formed the nucleus of the large num- 
ber of companies since organized. 

The Western Union Oil Co. 

This territory referred to above contains 
about 8,000 acres and has now about twenty- 
five producing wells, and five that are drill- 
ing to the deeper levels. 

The first two years of drilling wells were 
bored to the first oil strata 1500 to 1700 
feet, the shallow belt. They are bored very 
quickly to this depth, but it was soon found 
that but little oil was obtained from this 
stratum. The Pinal Co. went deeper and 
discovered a higher gravity oil and a very 
much larger quantity of it at the lower oil 
sands. 2400 feet in depth. The Western 
Union then began deepening some of their 
wells, and though they had to go down to 
3200 feet and over, the lightness and the 
immense yield of oil more than justified the 
expense. All the new wells are being bored 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



to the deeper oil sands. The company is 
now delivering their heavier (fuel) oils in 
a pipe line to Gaviota, a point on the coast 
thirty miles above Santa Barbara. Their 
lighter oil is at present under contract to 
deliver to the Pacific Coast Oil Co. (Stand- 
great expense in developing their territory 
this company is now on a good paying basis 
and is issuing dividends regularly to its 
shareholders. It has a large contract with 
the Pacific Coast Oil Co. for its lighter oils, 
which are piped to Port Harford. 

The Pinal Oil Co. 

Somehow as this was the first home com- 
pany to enter the field it should have been 
named the Santa Maria Oil Co., but the 
name Pinal was chosen to commemorate its 
location in the pineries of these scenic hills. 
The organization of this company was ef- 
fected and work commenced in 1902 ; and 
the first gusher was struck in the fall of 
the same year. 

Since that time ten wells have been bored 
and every one of them profitable producers. 
They are now beginning on the eleventh 
well. The formation is mainly shale and no 
difficulties whatever are encountered in bor- 
ing. It was found by experiment that the 
first strata where oil was found (1500 to 1650 
feet depths) was different in the oil yield. 
One of the wells-bored was deepened when 
more oil of a lighter gravity was discovered. 
Wells of large producing capacities were 
found at these lower depths, which range 
from 2400 to 3200 feet. In passing below 
the first oil stratum alternate strata of bar- 
ren and productive sands are encountered ; 
altogether fully 200 feet of oil-bearing sands 
or shales is met with. This is what affords 
such a large yield to these deep wells, rang- 
ing from 300 to 800 barrels each daily and 
usually flowing out under pressure. 

Several wells have been deepened. Out 
of these ten wells, however, only five are at 
present being used to supply a large con- 
tract with the Standard Oil Co., and the oil, 
27 to 29 degrees gravity (a high refinable 
grade) gravitates to Port Harford through 
an 8-inch pipe directly without any pump- 
ing. Unlike other wells in other fields the 
yields tapers off but little. (At present there 
are five deep wells and five shallow and in- 
termediate ones.) 

The company has been very fortunate in 
all its undertakings and has been most ex- 
cellently fiananced. No promoters' stock 
was ever issued. Sound business principles 
has carried it to where it stands to-day. 
Two hundred thousand shares was the basis 
of incorporation, of which 140,000 were sub 
scribed at once. The price of the shares are 
rising, as at present monthly dividends are 
being paid. Stock in this company may be 
considered one of the safest of investments. 
No assessment has ever been levied, and 
the company has its land all paid for, and 
is rapidly paying off the costs of its well 
from its monthly output. The ten wells are 
on only fifty acres of its territory — hardly 
an eighth of its land. 

The secretary and manager of the com- 
pany since its beginning is J.-F. Goodwin 
of Santa Maria. The other officers and di- 
rectors are prominent Santa Marians, and 
three from San Luis Obispo; M. Fleisher, 
president; J. W. Atkinson, vice-pesident; P. 
.0. Tietzenj treasurer ; McD. R. Venable, B. 



Pezzoni, E. St. Clark, Sam Fleisher and 
Henry Werner in the directorate. 

The oil from the Pinal's Brookline Co. 
and neighboring fields though of a high 
gravity, is nevertheless good fuel oil, and it 
has been a boon to the beet sugar factory, 
seven miles away in the same valley. It 
also makes pump irrigation cheap, where 
coal is almost prohibitive in cost when 
freighted here, in fact all through Southern 
California fuel oil is the reviver of manufac- 
turing interests. 

The Union Oil Co. 

Of all the companies in the Santa Maria 
fields the Union Oil Co. is the largest and 
the best equipped for delivery as well as 
production of oil. Two of their leases ad- 
join the Pinal Oil Co. and they have the 
same high grade of oil and heavy producing 
wells, but more of them, and their one Hart- 
nell gusher still outdoes everything in the 
state. The Union Oil Co. also controls large 
holdings in the Lompoc Anticline and else- 
where in this north and westerly end of 
Santa Barbara County. It has large tracts 
of as yet unworked fields ; but it has suffi- 
ciently developed and proven territory to 
bore hundreds of wells when found neces- 
sary. 

Their large developments on the Santa 
Maria anticline, the number of men and 
their families, justified them in laying out a 
town six miles south of Santa Mara on the 
Pacific Coast Company's (narrow gauge) 
line, known as Orcutt. This name was given 
it to remember their head geologist and ex- 
pert, W. W. Orcutt, who made all their 
locations for them. 

It is but a little over two years since this 
field was first opened up, and the field is a 
hive of industry. The town shows a steady 
growth, machines shops have been estab- 
lished there, the three large oil well supply 
companies have their permanent branch 
offices there — the National Supply Co., 
Fairbanks, Morse & Co., and Herron & Co. 
A number of residences have been erected 
by the company for their men, besides num- 
bers of private dwellings, the usual amount 
of stores and shops ; recently a new school 
house and church have been added. A num- 
ber of large tanks (35,000 barrels capacity) 
have been erected on the line of the railroad 
as reservoirs for their field one to two miles 
further above the town. Some of their wells, 
notably those on the Hobbs lease, can run 
by gravity direct to Port Harford through 
their own pipe line, which we shall lefer 
to again. 

The field is managed by P. P. Hill, an 
affable, pleasant superintendent, and who is 
most thoroughly familiar with every detail 
of his work. The company has been excep- 
tionally successful in this field, not a single 
dry well has been encountered ; no serious 
difficulties have been met in boring their 
wells, though some of them are over 3,00c 
feet deep. The Santa Maria field is noted 
for its deep wells, but as more than com- 
pensation for deep borings is the great pro- 
ductivity of the wells ; the permanency of 
which seems assured by the depth of the 
oil-carrying formations, covering- from 100 
to 200 feet of the range of the pipe. 

Different gravities of oil are encountered, 
but the quantity is all the better gravities. 
The Hartnell on the west gives 25 degrees. 



and the east end of the field as high as 29 
degree gravity. Some of their wells, as in 
othr fields, stopped at the first-oil-bearing 
stratum, ranging around 1600 or 1700 feet. 
They are now engaged in deepening a num- 
ber of these wells. The advantage in deep- 
ening is the finding of light oils and what 
is still more, greater producing wells. A 
shallow well that averages 50 to 75 barrels 
will yield 300 barrels or more on going 
deeper. On the Hobbs lease the average 
yield of the wells is 250 barrels per day; 
and what is known as Hobbs No. 6 actually, 
flows 800 barrels per day. The depth of these 
wells is of little expense in getting out the 
oil, as they are all under a heavy gas pres- , 
sure and flow out without pumping, and 
when pumped it accelerates the yield. 

In a previous issue we referred to the 
Hartnell gusher. This is a phenomenal well 
of the Union Company. Thirteen months 
ago it started to spout and still gushes out 
a large volume of oil. At first it was about 
8,000 barrels, and it still yields about 3,000 
barrels daily. 

The Union Oil Co. has recently acquired 
the adjacent territory of the Santa Maria 
Oil and Gas Co., also a smaller tributary 
field known as the Folsom lease. The 
Union has large holdings in the Lompoc 
anticline, about ten miles further south over 
another ridge. This is, however, connected 
by a pipe line with the Orcutt reservoirs. 
The Lompoc field has ten deep, producing 
wells and five more are being drilled. These 
producing wells are not being used at pres- 
ent, being held as a reserve for future in- 
creasing demands. 

The oil in this field is both good refinable 
oil and fuel oil, an advantage it possesses 
over most other fields. Having both quali- 
ties it has a larger field of usefulness and 
profit. Some of the lighter gravity oils are 
excellent distillate and gasoline producers 
when refined. So far no refining is done 
here, the crude oil being shipped from Port 
Harford (the end of their pipe line) to their 
Los Angeles refineries when wanted. The 
Pinal Oil Co. (adjacent to this field) made 
a thorough analysis of the lighter gravity 
oils, and found it possessed of a large per- 
centage of coal oil, gasoline and other light 
oil products. 

The Union Oil Co. has acquired title from 
the Marre estate to the disputed pipe line 
right bf way, also for very ample tankage 
ground near Port Harford, and for several 
acres of valuable water front on San Luis 
Bay,' part of the site of Avila. Port Har- 
ford is. owned exclusively by the Narrow 
Gauge Company and the steamship line. We 
consider that this is one of the best moves 
of the Union Oil Co. in its successful ven- 
tures connected with the Santa Maria field. 
The wharf is about thirty-five miles distant 
from its wells, and most of its oil is of suffi- 
cient light gravity to require but little pump- 
ing. It owns its own steamer lines and 
through these shipping facilities is in a very 
independent position, bringing the oil in its 
own pipe line to this coast landing point. 

Some of its surplus it sells to the Stand- 
ard Oil Co. This is the only relationship 
the Union bears to the Standard, a very 
reasonable one. Its tankage and shipping 
location on San Luis Bay are separate and 
distinct, as are also their reservoirs and pipe 
lines. Much sensational talk was indulged 
in several months ago in the Examiner re- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



garding this company which hail not the 
least bit of foundation in fact. 

The executive officers of the Union are all 

\ngeles men. and it is a stock company, 

and has other oil holdings. This \vc believe 

eir largest field and surely it has the 

greatest of promises. Actually only a very 

small part of the field is yet developed. 

More recently the Union has been ac- 
quiring an oil station on both sides of the 
Panama Canal, with right of way for pipe 
line.- across the isthmus. ( 'il in their tank 
steamers can be taken directly from Port 
Harford to Panama, and that made a dis- 
tributing center for a large Central and 
Southern American trade, and through a 
pipe line oil can be cheaply and quickly 
transferred to the Atlantic side. With \ es- 
sels to transport it the oil could be carried 
to Europe, giving an enormous additional 
avenue of future trade. 

The Graciosa Oil Co. 

This company has its location directly 
west of the Western I'nion, and though 
showing comparatively little disposition of 
production has a very great amount of oil 
in its several wells. The company is drill- 
ing deep wells one after another to hold in 
reserve when it is ready for its large and 
extensive future refining undertakings. No 
more discouraging beginning did any com- 
pany encounter than the Graciosa . The 
first well was bored and after much expense 
was abandoned. The second well was un- 
dertaken and at the upper oil stratum look- 
ed as if the oil was petering out. The inde- 
fatigable confidence of Mr. A. Phillips and 
the ample means of the company alone saved 
the venture, for finally at 3200 feet a gusher 
was encountered that, after the gas subsided, 
steadily flows 400 to 500 barrels of light 
gravity oil daily. 

Other wells were bored in the field that 
are of the same type. A pipe line connects 
these wells with Gaviota and another more 
recent one runs to the S. P. station at Cas- 
malia. which is intended eventually to run 
to the ocean beach at the old Point Sal 
landing place or elsewhere as the company 
may decide. 

This is the company that has interested 
foreign capital also for a large refining prop- 
osition. 

The Brookshire Oil Co. 

The Brookshire owns its territory to the 
west and north of the Pinal Co. Several of 
the stockholders of the Pinal are interested 
in this company. The first well bored 
proved a water well, and it was found im- 
practicable to bore through the water. At 
first it seemed a serious disappointment to 
the company, but as they tried to pump out 
the water without effect it was soon real- 
ized that it was more valuable than an oil 
well for the field. Water was scarce in the 
nearby wells and it was found a most pro- 
fitable investment to pipe the water to many 
of the oil wells in the field. The next well 
(a different location was made) proved it- 
self a big gusher. Three others followed in 
its wake and they are still continuing their 
development work. This company pipe- 
lines its oil to Betteravia, at the sugar fac- 
tory S. P. spur, and to the narrow gauge at 
La Graciosa. 

Santa Maria Oil Co. 

This name was taken by the Kaiser Bros, 
from their extensive asphalt mines operated 
some eight or ten years before on the loca- 



tion where their first well was bored this 
year. The first well going down in any new 
field is usually very long in drilling, but this 
was not. This well and that of Hall & Hall 

No. I are to-day the further* of the 

finished wells. They are both of line light 
gravity and heavy producing wells. 

Hall & Hall. 
The well above referred to, adjoining the 
Kaisers, known as the Foster lease, is the 
first to come in for Hall & Hall, and is a 
producer, of the gravity and How of 
the surrounding field to the south and 
This company has another location three- 
quarters of a mile further east, known as the 
Coblentz Oil Co., still under the drill. 

Rice Ranch Oil Co. 

This is a part of the Santa Maria I )il Co.'s 
location, and their well No. I is about 2400 
feet deep with good indications for good 
oil. 

New Pennsylvania Petroleum Oil Co. 

In this same locality another company is 
drilling, the Pennsylvania, as they call them- 
selves. They are down 2600 feet and in oil, 
but as usual in these locations they go down 
into the oil sands until the gas pressure 
forces the oil to flow out, if not to gush 
forth. 

The Standard Oil Company reaches with 
its pipe lines right into this field and is 
ready to take oil as soon as any of these 
wells have tankage deliveries ready. 

Goodwin & Tietzen Co. 

Mr. Goodwin, the superintendent of the 
Pinal Oil Co., associating himself with P. 
O. Tietzen, of the Bank of Santa Maria, 
have started to drill a test well on a 75-acre 
tract adjoining the Newlove ranch and the 
Folsom lease of the Union Oil Co. Hardly 
had they gone down 1000 feet when they 
have encountered the first oil seepages which 
are usually only found at the 1600-foot 
levels. They are evidently at or near the 
top of the anticline in the heart of the oil 
belt. 
The Los Almos Oil and Development Co. 

About eight miles south of all this central 
Santa Maria oil field, another test well has 
been bored during two and one-half years 
and oil recently found, in what is called the 
Los Alamos Anticline. This is probably 
the deepest well in "the State, being 4200 
feet deep. The well was bored by Wm. 
Logan. The oil is 36 degrees gravity, the 
very lightest in the field, and flows out of 
the casing. 

The Eastern Field. 

Only two companies so far are drilling in 
the Eastern fields. The well of the Recruit 
Oil Co. in Cat Canyon is about 3000 feet 
deep in good formation, passing through 
several shallow oil strata but not yet deep 
enough apparently for the main oil stratum. 

The other company, known as the Palmer 
Oil Co., is represented by E. E. Henderson, 
who is drilling on the Blochman place and is 
about 1000 feet deep in formation resembling 
some of the other. 

The drilling of both these test wells is 
looked upon with a great deal of interest, as 
it will prove a large easterly territory. 
The Western Fields. 

Considerable more interest, however, cen- 
ters in the Western fields, where heavier 
fuel oil is looked for. The Claremont and 
Syndicate ( til companies are both recently 
organized to further test a field, the one 



two miles, the Other six miles, west. 

The Recruit Co, has .1 deep well 
its westerlj leases, just coming into oil. The 
Southern Pacific i- experimenting on one 

well also. The future coming in of this field 

will enlarge the oil teerritorj still more. 

The Distribution of the Oil. 
Five main pipe lines and a narrow gauge 
train arc the distribution factors at present, 
Th.' largest pipe line is that of the Pacific 
Coast 1 hi (o.'s that runs from the tanks 
next to the wells to several large storage 
tanks near Orcutt. From here, as it accu- 
mulates, it runs directly by gravity to Port 
Harford through an 8-inch pipe; no pump- 
ing is ordinarily necessary unless a larger 
volume than what flows through is required, 
this averaging about 8000 barrels per day. 
At Tort Harford there are several receiving 
tanks from which it runs by gravity to the 
steamers ready to receive it. 

The Union Oil Co. has a similar pipe line, 
all for its own uses, however. They have 
pipe lines from their several wells that cen- 
ter at Orcutt itself, from where the pipe line 
follows to Port Harford by a somewhat dif- 
ferent route. They have their own tanks 
and shipping facilities in San Luis Bay. In 
addition the Union ships heavily through 
the narrow gauge cars to their port tankage. 
They have recently constructed pipe lines 
to the sugar factory and for irrigating. 

The Pinal and Brookshire companies, in 
addition to their connection with the Stand- 
ard's pipe, connect with the narrow gauge 
track, the Brookshire with the S. P. station 
at Betteravia also. 

The Western Union connects with the 
Standard's lines, but in addition it has a 
separate line to the Gaviota wharf on the 
Safita Barbara channel, as well as a short 
one to the narrow gauge. The Graciosa 
Oil Co. connects on to the Western Union's 
pipe, but has also an independent line to 
Casmalia on the S. P. 

The facilities for distribution are adequate 
for the present, but that greater facilities 
will have to be afforded as the field devel- 
ops is very obvious. 

At Gaviota and the local distributing point 
a good price is paid for oil, but the Pacific 
Coast Co. (Standard) has during the year 
twice reduced the price of oil, so that at 
present a very low price prevails for those 
that have contracts with it. . Considerable 
outside shipment is clone at fair prices to 
producers. 

Summary of the Field. 

In summarizing the field its advantages 
may be stated as manifold. 

The great productivity of the wells, with- 
out doubt the greatest daily average to be 
met with anywhere. 

The light gravity oil, being also fuel oil 
as well as distillable. 

The large area to this field, with only as 
yet here and there a well and an enormous 
territory to drain from. 

Excellent shipping facilities and indepen- 
dence of railroads. 

Wells that flow, requiring little if any 
pumping, either to get out of the wells or to 
run through pipe lines. 

No salt water or any other exhausting 
tendencies in any of the deep wells, give 
promise of an uncommonly long-lived oil 
field, the greatest on the continent. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



KERM COUMTY 

By Clarence Wilson 



■*^^Bt* HE year of 1905 has been one of 

O stagnation in the oil industry of 
Kern County. When in the lat- 
ter part of 1904 the text of the 
contract made between the organization 
known as the Independent Oil Producers' 
Agency and the Associated Oil Co., with 
the conditions of the contract and price paid 
for the oil, became public property, every 
well informed and experienced oil man in 
the business knew that it ended any hope 
the producers might have for an advanced 
price during the coming year of 1905. 

While the Independent Oil Producers' 
Agency controlled but a small portion of the 
entire output of the field — not to exceed one- 
fourth at the largest estimate — at the same 
time all other oil available for market was 
either tied up with contracts or was pro- 
duced by companies who would not con- 
sider a price of 15 cents per barrel net under 
any consideration. 

With one-third of the total oil produced 
by the Independents stored by the Associ- 
ated Oil Co. at the expense of the Inde- 
pendents, and with a clause in the contract 
that gave the buyer a thirty-day option on 
all stored oil at the same. price as might be 
offered by any prospective buyer, the Inde- 
pendent Producers' Agency had no chance 
whatever to force up the price they were to 
receive in the least. All the producers and 
owners in the Kern River field knew that 
with this stored oil in their reservoirs, the 
Associated Oil Co. or the Standard Oil Co. 
would have no occasion whatever to pay at 
any time during the year any more than 
the contract price with the Independents 
of 18 cents per barrel. 

With this situation confronting them, no 
producer has thought it would be economy 
to add to the already burdensome expense 
of running Kern River leases by drilling 
more wells to add to a production which, 
when sold at the prevailing prices, would 
hardly more than pay the bare expenses of 
running the lease. 

Consequently no new wells to amount to 
anything have been drilled during the past 
year. Some of the larger companies having 
contracts calling for a certain production 
have found drilling necessary in order to 
keep their production up to the amounts 
called for in their contracts and, on some 
leases where the terms called for so m'any 
wells per year said terms have been com- 
plied with, but outside of these wells few 
new ones have been put down. 

There is no question in the minds of the 
best informed men in the business that had 
not the production of the state as a whole 
been vastly increased during the year the 
shortage of oil between that consumed and 
produced would, before the first six months 
of the year had passed, have sent the price 
of fuel oil skyward, but the great Coalinga 
field was being rapidly exploited, and dur- 
ing the first six months enough new produc- 
tion was added to that field to maintain the 
average between consumption and produc- 
tion. At the beginning of the year at least 
forty or fifty strings of tools were running 
in the Coalinga field. While many wells 
were being drilled in the Salt Lake and 



Santa Maria fields, the length of time neces- 
sary to complete did not give the Kern 
County producer the cause for alarm that 
the Coalinga development did. No one ex- 
pected much improvement during the year 
and safe to say none have been very badly 
disappointed at the continued depression 
that has prevailed. 

During the early part of the year large 
quantities of Kern River oil was being 
shipped to the southern part of the state, but 
the increased production of the Salt Lake 
field now almost wholly supplies the de- 
mand in that section, and cut off large ship- 
ments from this field. 

Whether the Salt Lake field will be able 
to supply the demand for any time is a ques- 
tion discussed a great deal .pro and con. by 
men having interests in the Kern County 
fields. From the number of wells drilling 
and the tools constantly running the general 
idea here seems to be that not only will the 
field be unable to supply the local demand 
but will be forced to call on either Santa 
Maria or Kern County to furnish the con- 
sumers of crude oil with fuel. 

The daily production of the Kern River 
field has decreased in the last year from 
10 to 20 per cent — some estimates running 
even higher — but it is safe to say that the 
average decline for the year is at least 15 
per cent, of which the greatest has been 
during the last four months. The average 
daily production for December will be about 
35,000 barrels per day, while the daily aver- 
age for the same month last year, ran close 
to 45,000 barrels per day. This is no un- 
natural decline and is in fact much less than 
might be expected in view of the constant 
drain for the past five years. 

According to the best reports and in- 
formation the stocks on hand and in storage 
at Bakersfield have been added to but very 
little during the year ; in fact it is generally 
conceded that the production of Kern River 
field does not exceed the demand for the 
gravity of oil produced by the wells of the 
district. 

Of new work completed in the Kern field 
during the year the largest number of new 
wells have been drilled by the Imperial and 
Thirty-Three companies, both of which have 
contracts with the Southern Pacific Railroad 
calling for large quantities of oil which ne- 
cessitated the drilling of a large number of 
new wells. 

The Sterling Oil Co. finished ten new 
wells during the year, and the Peerless Oil 
Co. about the same, number. Of this fresh 
production none but that of the Sterling Oil 
Co. has been put on the market as saleable 
oil, the Peerless having a contract with the 
Standard Oil Co. calling for the delivery of 
9,000,000 barrels of oil, of which about half 
has been delivered up to the 31st of Decem- 
ber, 1905. A few other new wells have been 
completed, but not to exceed twenty-five 
outside of the companies mentioned. 

Two wells have been drilling during the 
year in an endeavor to reach a deep sand 
that is supposed to underlay that from 
which the oil is taken at the present time. 
One of these has been drilled by F. J. Car- 



man on the Grace Oil Co.'s lease, in the 
extreme southern and western part of the 
field. The other is by the Santa Fe on Sec- 
tion 24 in the extreme western and northern 
part of the field and out of the line of proven 
territory. The well drilled by Carman was 
an old well that had been carried to a depth 
of 1400 feet. Mr. Carman started the deep 
hole from that depth. At about 2200 feet 
the drill went into a shale mixed with 
streaks of sand and gas bearing strata until 
a depth of 3260 feet was reached when a 
strata of salt water was struck with suffi- 
cient pressure to force the salt water to 
flow up through the 3200 feet of casing. 
With the hole down to 3%-inch casing this 
flow made it impossible to carry the well 
to any greater depth, and much to the regret 
of those interested in the deep sand theory 
the well had to be abandoned. Not aban- 
doned entirely, for at about 1500 feet is a 
strata of good oil sand that is lighter than 
the most of the oil in the field. The well 
will be perforated at this depth and will be 
as good a producer as any in the field. 

But the deep sand was not reached. 
Whether it exists or not is a question. The 
idea of Mr. Carman, who is an experienced 
and extensive operator in the Eastern oil 
fields, is that the salt water comes from an 
oil sand, in fact he says there is no doubt 
of it being the oil sand, but the salt water 
has replaced the oil. Whether it will be 
possible to find any deep sand at all in the 
field is not known. After Mr. Carman's 
experience it is not likely any one else will 
have the nerve to drill for it. The Santa 
Fe will finish their well on Section 24 to as 
great a depth as possible and if their ex- 
perience is the same as Carman's it is safe 
to say that no deep sand will ever be found 
in the Kern River field. 

During the year ended December 31st the 
Southern Pacific Co. commenced to lay their 
line of corrugated pipe from the field to 
Delano. This line will soon be in operation 
and the test will be watched with interest 
by all oil men in the state. The idea of 
corrugations is something new and has 
never been tried by pipe line companies be- 
fore. If the theory is a success it will revo- 
lutionize the oil industry in fields far away 
from tidewater. 

The great problem of the Kern County 
fields is to get the oil to market, the ordinary 
pipe line not handling the oil with satisfac- 
tion. With exorbitant railroad charges now 
in effect, it is impossible to market the oil 
in competiton wth those fields nearer the 
markets and with water transportation. 

Many rumors are currently reported to 
the effect that the line will be extended 
through to San Francisco, but no authentic 
information has been given out that there 
is any such intention on the part of the 
Southern Pacific Company. The Standard 
Oil Co. will doubtless lay another line from 
Mendota to Point Richmond during the next 
year, which will probably have an immedi- 
ate effect on Kern deliveries, as this will 
make a line for the exclusive use of trans- 
porting Kern County oil. It is hoped by 
the operators in the field that with the com- 
pletion of this second line the Standard will 
commence to pipe Kern River Oil and re- 
enter the market as a buyer of oil. Some 
few small contracts have been made by the 
Standard already with companies having 
limited production and no contracts or other 
means of caring; for their oil. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



The Indcpedenl Producers' contract with 
iated will expire some time during 
the first few months of 1906, and when it 
expire- ii i- expected' the new contract 
made will settle the price for anotchr year. 
The Union < >il Co. has just completed one 
>arrel reservoir and lias bought 
enough land close by that would enable 
them to build another. If they do start an- 
other reservoir tile oil men feel satisfied the 
Union will be in the market for Kern River 

oil. 

Enough reports have been given out re- 
garding pipe lines across the Isthmus of 
Panama to warrant the belief that some of 
the big companies, either the Associated. 
the Standard or Union, will eventually enter 
the markets of Europe in competition with 
Russian fuel oil. The purchase by the Union 
< >il Co. of several steamers gives a good deal 
of color to tins belief. While the Union 

( )il Co. is not expected to ever become a 
great factor in the Kern County markets. 
owing to their immense holdings near the 
coast, any oil they do produce and send 
across the Isthmus will take that much away 
from the local market ami allow the local 
producer more chance of disposing of his 
production. 

\\ it Ii the Union drilling back of Sunset 
and building reservoirs in the Kern River 
field operators think the great Standard Oil 
( o. will have an opportunity to test the 
mettle of a competitor which has the oil 
land, facilities for marketing oil, and a de- 
termination not to let any other than the 
present controllers of its policy to ever gain 
a controlling interest in its stock. 

With only 15,000,000 barrels of stock oil 
on hand it does look as if the situation in 
the Kern County fields must improve. Dur- 
ing the next year there is a certainty that 
the production of the field will have to be 
brought up by more drilling, the other fields 
of the state will have to increase their pro- 
duction, or the oil in tankage here will have 
to be shipped out in part to meet the ever 
increasing demand. Producers have not 
much hope of any material increase in the 
price, but with the decreasing production 
per well, and the extra expense incurred in 
running the old wells as they decrease in 
production, the price oil is sold for will have 
to rise to above 15 cents per barrel, as that 
price is now less than the actual cost of pro- 
ducing the oil. 

The McKittrick field cannot be looked to 
for any increase in production ; on the con- 
trary that field has declined during the past 
year. All the territory that can produce oil 
has practically been drilled and any future 
operations in that district must be in new 
and undeveloped territory. It will be seen 
from the statistics given but comparatively 
little oil has gone into storage in the Kern 
River field during the last year. The amount 
stored over the shipments is 4.500,000 bar- 
rels, of which the largest part was stored 
during the early part of the year. Of this 
amount about 2,450,000 was purchased and 
stored by the Standard Oil Co. on contracts 
with the Peerless Oil Co. and the Monte 
Cristo. Two million two hundred fifty 
thousand barrels were stored in the res- 
ervoirs of the Associated Oil Co. on oil re- 
ceived from the Independent Agency. 

In the last three months the shipments 
from the field have very nearly equaled the 
entire production and for the month of De- 



cember it is thought by those who are keep- 
ing close tab on the situation that the 
amount of oil shipped Will actually exceed 
that produced, and for the first lime in the 
history of the Kern River field the surplus 
or stock oil will be called on to supply the 
demand lor shipping oil. 

McKittrick. 

McKittrick has been dead for the past 
year. The Onlj item of interest that comes 
from there is the drilling of a deep well 
by the Crocker-Woolworth interests, and 
tlie striking of a large flow of gas in new 
and undeveloped territory as told by the 
Pacific Oil Reporter at the time. Nothing 
new of interest has happened at this well 
since that lime. Contractor Jones is mak- 
ing as satisfactory progress aa possible un- 
der the circumstances, and has hopes of 
bringing in a well that will surprise the oil 
men of the country. 

Midway. 

When the sale of the Chanslor-Canficld 
holdings to the Santa Fe Railroad Co. was 
made during the early summer, all owners 
of land in the Midway district thought the 
railroad would be at once extended to the 
main camp of the Chanslor-Canfield prop- 
erties, but for some reason such has not 
been the case. Constant drilling has been 
going on on the property, but the railroad 
has not been extended. 

Sunset. 

The Sunset field seems to have tempor- 
arily given up any hope of being able to dis- 



pose of its ,,il for fuel and has cam 

paign for road oil markets with much sue 
cess, t lonstantl) incre; quantitie 

road oil is being shipped from lli.it district. 
and the demand for the coming J ear bids 

fair to increase manyfold. The consumption 

ol" road oil has not yet reached a Stage thai 
it demands all the oil that Sunsel can sup 
ply, Inn n the demand increases al the rate 
11 has during the pasl Near. onl\ a short time 
will elapse until the Sunset wells will be 
taxed to their full capacity for road pur- 
poses. 

The Adeline ( >il Co. in this field has three 
wells thai make an average of over 200 
barrels per well daily, flowing, and the Pe- 
troleum Center Oil Co. nearby has several 
wells that would prove equally as good if 
permitted to How their full capacity. 

The Webb-Foot Oil Syndicate, drilling in 
the hills back of Sunset, have not so far 
discovered any indication of oil that would 
warrant the name of a strike, but they keep 
the drill constantly at work and have hopes 
of finding the light oil they are drilling for. 

Sunset and Midway have many good oil 
properties that are capable of producing 
large quantities of good oil, but the low 
prire and cost of operations in those dis- 
tricts, coupled with lack of proper trans- 
portation facilities, have kept the owners 
locked in for the past four years. Unless 
conditions change or the demand for road 
oil increases rapidly, no new work can he 
expected from the districts for some time 
to come. 



Sunset Midway Oil Fields 

By HON. C. A. BARLOW 



/tmmrjl T MAY be said of the Sunset field 
mm that during the past year it has 
^Xm taken its place among the oil 
fields of the State that are plac- 
ing their products on the market. The ter- 
ritory has been proven for several years. 
For three years past there has been shipping 
facilities, but not until this- year has any 
business been transacted along the line of 
marketing the products. To be sure, there 
has been some few shipments of oil,, but 
nothing worthy of mention. During the year 
just closed the shipments from the field 
amounted to something like 2000 carloads of 
oil and asphaltum. The credit for the mar- 
keting of these products belongs largely to 
the Sunset Road Oil Company, of which H. 
A. Blodget is manager. 

The product of the Sunset field is mostly 
a low gravity oil, the highest being 17 de- 
grees and the lowest 1 1 degrees. The high- 
er gravity oil is excellent fuel oil. While 
that of the lower gravity contains more heat 
units it is very difficult to handle and is 
therefore practically barred from the fuel 
market. But Mr. Blodget and associates, 
having been working with these low grav- 
ity oils for many years, had learned that. 
for certain purposes they were without a 
competitor, and, knowing this, they inaugur- 
ated a system of education among the vari- 
ous cities and counties of the State, and to- 
day, as a result of this work. Sunset oil (the 
low gravity) stands without a competitor 



in the market for the making of "oiled 
roads." For corroboration of this sweeping 
statement, write to any county or city where 
it has been used the past year — Riverside, 
Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Diego, Santa 
Ana, San Pedro, Pasadena, Fresno, Bakers- 
field, Tulare, Kings, Merced, San Joaquin, 
Sacramento and many others. 

I speak of this as I have because the 
roads of the State, yes, of many of the Paci- 
fic Coast States, are going to be built of this 
product because it has been proven beyond 
doubt that the "natural liquid asphalt," this 
low gravity oil found only in the Sunset 
field, makes the finest roadways in the 
world. Some attempt has been made to 
imitate this product by taking some of the 
lighter or more volatile matter out of other 
oils, thus reducing the residum to the same 
gravity as the "natural oil" of the Sunset 
field, but it resulted in failure. 

There is considerable activity in the Sun- 
set field in anticipation of the demand for 
oil for road work the coming year. 

On the New Center Oil Company's prop- 
erty on section 12-11-24 a very tine well was 
brought in three months ago ami work has 
been commenced on another which will be 
completed the first of the year. 

The Fulton wells are being pumped and 
the oil stored in the two large reservoirs 
longing to that company. 

The Maricopa wells, those old landmarks, 
are being worked and are still capable of 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



flowing as well as they have for the past 
five years. 

The Adeline wells are the best ones on 
the West Side and their record for the past 
year is an enviable one. This company is 
just finishing another well and will drill still 
another the fore part of the coming year. 
They are adding another reservoir to their 
storage facilities, with a capacity for 100,000 
barrels. They disposed of every barrel of 
their oil the past year and have plenty of 
market for it the coming season. 

The United Crude has drilled a second 
well on their holdings and it is as good as 
the first, which is saying all that any one 
could ask. 

The Petroleum Center has drilled two 
wells the past year and have the lighest oil 
in the field, it being over 17 degrees gravity. 

The Transport has just finished a well in 
a second sand and found oil of 16 degrees 
gravity. They have a great well. 

The Monarch property is working its full 
capacity and will add many new wells the 
coming year. This property furnishes the 
oil to the King-Keystone refinery on the San 
Francisco Bay, and they are making all 
kinds of oils for various uses. Most of the 
oil companies in Sunset field are using these 
oils and they pronounce them the best lubri- 
cating oils in the market. This opens up a 
large new field for these heavy oils. 

The Obispo property has just gone into 
the hands of the California Diamond Oil 
Co. and will be carried along to success by 
H. B. Guthrey, who is manager of the new 
concern. 

The Fremont, Copper Consolidated, Pa- 
cific, J. B. & B., Reynolds, and other com- 
panies on sections 34"35> are a11 g ett j n g 
ready for the demand during the coming 
season for their product. 

Of course the California Fortune is pro- 
ducing as it has been for the past four years. 
It has several large reservoirs full of oil 
and still all the wells continue to flow. It 
is believed that the coming year will see 
their property connected with shipping fa- 
cilities, thus enabling the management to 
market the thousands of barrels of oil on 
hand. Most of the wells on the properties 
referred to are flowing ones. 

The Midway field is still wanting one 
thing and wanting it badly, namely, trans- 
portation. When the Santa Fe Railroad 
bought in with Chanslor & Canfield, and 
commenced to handle those large interests 
in that field, we were all ready to believe 
that the year 1905 would not roll by with- 
out the railroad being extended from Mari- 
copa to the headquarters of Chanslor & 
Canfield on section 8-32^23. The railroad 
has hauled the ties, fish-plates and nails 
needed to do the work, the surveying has 
been completed, the surveyors have been 
waiting for the contractors for the past two 
months — and are still waiting. It is said 
that with the beginning of the new year 
work will be commenced and the many com- 
panies in the Midway field with good pro- 
ducing wells will be glad when the first dirt 
flies. 

The only development in the southern 
part of the Midway field during the past 
year is the finishing of the Paraffine Com- 



pany's well on section 25-32-23 and the drill- 
ing of the well on section 24, just north of 
it, by the Santa Fe interests. This first well 
is a good producer and on section 24 they 
have found the first sand and are still at 
work. This demonstrates that the Midway 
field at this point is considerably over one 
mile in width. In the northern part of the 
field several wells have been completed by 
the Santa Fe interests on section 8-32-23 
and in that vicinity. They now have several 
strings of tools running on the property, 
drilling new wells and cleaning out the old 
ones and putting them to production. 

The Oregon Midway well was drilled be- 
low the first sands and at about 2000 feet 
they found another oil sand and the product 
was a very light gravity oil. They were 
drilling in 5^-inch casing and the gas pres- 
sure collapsed it. Not being in touch with 
marketing facilities they never did any more 
work on the well, but it proved what most 
good oil men believed, that Midway has a 
deep sand underlying the whole field, and a 
very light gravity of oil. Time and the drill 
will more completely demonstrate this con- 
clusion. 

What of the future of these proven oil 
fields? One year ago it was believed that 
another twelve months could not roll away 
without the demand for oil being so great 
that this storehouse would have to be called 
upon to fill the demand. But the develop- 
ment of other localities, more favorably sit- 
uated as to transportation, has enabled the 
demand to be filled without calling for any 
great quantity of Sunset-Midway oil. How- 
ever, while other fields have been found to 
maintain the production of the State, the 
general opinion of those who are in touch 
with the situation is that the supply and de- 
mand are about even, with the demand in- 
creasing at a ratio far greater than ever be- 
fore in the history of the oil industry in this 
State. If this opinion is correct, and I be- 
lieve that it is, then the coming year will 



see great activity in the Sunset-Midway 
fields. No other field in the State, outside of 
the Santa Maria field, will be able to add 
materially to its present production. On the 
contrary, the maximum of the other fields 
has been reached and from now on there 
will be a gradual but certain decline in their 
yield. Unless new fields are developed in 
this State, nothing can defer the demand for 
the product from the Sunset-Midway dis- 
trict. 

As for the consumption and its certainty 
of great and rapid increase, one has only to 
note the new plants that are installing oil 
as fuel; the new boats that are placing oil 
burners under their boilers ; new vessels that 
are every month being added to the con- 
stantly growing fleets of oil carriers that are 
placing this fuel oil in every port in the Pa- 
cific Ocean ; new railroads that are being 
built in all parts of the State and in ad- 
joining States. In fact, an observer cannot 
help but see the growing demand for fuel 
oil. We, who are interested in oil produc- 
ing properties, have had a long wait for the 
turn of the wheel, but it is certain to come 
our way ere long. 

Soon the time will come when those who 
have had their money tied up for several 
years in this great industry will be repaid 
and with good interest. While all parts 
of the State will feel this revival, no field 
will be in better shape to reap the advan- 
tages that will come with it than the Sun- 
set-Midway field. Many districts have seen 
their product thrown on a falling market at 
prices which were little more than the cost 
of production. This could mean nothing but 
disaster to those who placed their money 
in the enterprise. But Sunset-Midway could 
not, and did not, market its product, there- 
fore will be more advantageously situated 
to receive the benefits that will come with 
better prices. The year 1906 holds great 
promise for the Sunset-Midway district. 



Southern and Coast Districts 

By ARTHUR R. HINTON, 

Oil Editor of the Los Angeles Times.' 



--^^fc**' HE southern and coast districts of 

O California have been the scene 
of many 'new developments dur- 
ing the year 1905. During 1906 
it is certain that the industry will undergo 
many more startling developments. In the 
counties of Los Angeles, Ventura, Orange 
and Santa Barbara were produced not less 
than 9,000,000 out of the 35,000,000 barrels 
pumped from the fields of California, leaving 
the other 26,000,000 to come from the great 
districts of Kern and Fresno, with some 
scattering production in other counties. 

' For the sake of convenience I shall speak 
of Los Angeles and Orange counties as 
comprising the southern fields and of Ven- 
tura and Santa Barbara with the prospective 
districts of San Luis Obispo as the coast. 
I shall treat first of the south. 

In Los Angeles county the great features 
have been the rapid decline of the old city 
field and the rise of the Salt Lake or Amal- 
gamated properties just west of the city. 
The second has hastened the first, for how 
can wells producing from one to five barrels 



a day compete with those that pour forth 
from 200 to 2000. 

For years the output of the city wells has 
been going down. It has been for many 
years filled w ; ith considerable water and 
sediment. Pumped by small producers, often 
individual owners of two or three wells, as 
a side issue in some cases by men engaged 
in other business, much was placed on the 
market without any effort being made to 
free it from impurities. For years the city 
streets were treated with this and until the 
fall of 1904 no attempt was made to test it. 
When this was done by order of the city 
council as high as 40 per cent of impurities 
was found in some cases. This fall the 
highest has not been above 25 per cent, the 
lowest about 3 per cent, average about 8 
per cent. To-day all the city product is used 
for roads and streets and for the year will 
hardly exceed 150,000 barrels. Statistics are 
hard to get exact, as the ownership is scat- 
tered among individuals and there is no 
means of checking up, but it is more likely 
that the figures will be an over rather than 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



an tinder-estimate, hundreds of wells having 
tutu pumped !>ut little and not less than 300 
having been entirely abandoned. 

Strong agitation ha- been started during 
the year for the removal of wills in the 
Westlake district, when I abandon- 

ed derricks have been left. This i- fast be- 
coming a leading residence section and sev- 
eral meetings have been held by property 
Owners to demand action. It is now prac- 
tically settled that the wells will have to In- 
abandoned and filled up within the coining 
year. In other parts there is less agitation. 
but the city authorities have decided to 
move promptly against wells that are no 
longer used. Within the next two years at 
the outside the field will have ceased to 
exist. 

Amalgamated's Rise. 
The greatest change in the southern in- 
dustry in years, both as production, mar- 
keting and effect upon all lines of business 
was brought about when the Associated Oil 
Company entered the field, bought interests 
iti the Salt Lake Company, operating just 
west of the city, and organized the Amal- 
gamated as a subsidiary corporation. Still 
further control of this company has been 
acquired by the combine until only- a very- 
small proportion of the stock is held by the 
former owners. W. C. Price, who was presi- 
dent and general manager, has disposed of 
his entire holdings and the Associated has 
elected Burton E. Green, its treasurer, pres- 
ident and Frederick B. Henderson, late field 
superintendent at Kern River, general man- 
ager. 

There are three subsidiary field compan- 
ies controlled by the Amalgamated — the 
Mericos, the Salt Lake and the Arcturus. 
Adjoining the Amalgamated are the Schu- 
macher and Gihnore wells, the former sold 
some time since to the Pacific Light and 
Power Company, and wells owned by the 
I. us Angeles Pacific Railroad Company. 

The output is somewhat irregular. On 
one day it will be much heavier than on the 
one previous or following. The cause of 
this has never been absolutely determined 
but the product is very gaseous and con- 
tains a fair percentage of sulphur. Gushers 
have been brought in several times, lasting 
for weeks in some cases. Sometimes wells 
sand up and give considerable trouble, oth- 
ers are more regular. 

W. S. Porter, general manager of the As- 
sociated, some months ago gave a state- 
ment to the Los Angeles Times in which he 
estimated the average capacity of the Amal- 
gamated wells at 10,000 barrels a day, near- 
ly all of which was finding immediate mar- 
ket. As there are thirty producing wells 
this means an average of over 300 barrels 
a day per well. As there were several big- 
wells during the early part of the year the 
output may then have been about as great 
despite the lesser number of wells. This is 
the amount claimed for the year. It is not 
less than two-thirds of the total produced 
in the south. 

Wells vary from 1800 to 3000 feet in 
depth. While apparently an extension of 
the old city field the Amalgamated district 
is radically different. The oil is 18 to 20 
degrees gravity, whereas that of the older 
wells was 14 to 16 degrees, and where one 
or two sands at comparatively shallow 
depths, 800 to 1500 feet, were found in the 
city, four and five of great richness have 



been opened 1>\ the drill in the new district. 
Many ami varied are the opinion-, express 
ed regarding this field, its output ami prob- 
able life. Most of these seem to possess 
little value, being based upon superficial in- 
vestigations, rumor- and prejudice. The 
company is drilling continualh from ten U> 
thirteen string- of tool- have been running 
Steadily to keep and increase the output. 
There is considerable steel tankage but the 

amount of oil in storage is hardlj enough to 
be considered as an overproduction. 

The Associated people, one and all, ex- 

press the utmost confidence and declare that 

it is. perhaps, the best purchase they have 
made. Their course seems to prove their 
faith by works. While sometimes accused 
of misrepresenting the output of fields in 
which they have been interested it is inter- 
esting to note that their figures have been 
sustained by the Government reports in for- 
mer years. 

Whittier and Puente. 

The Whittier and Puente districts have 
not been as active as in previous years. 
Many properties have not been pumped to 
more than a fraction of their capacity. The 
total output will hardly exceed 950,000 bar- 
rels. 

Orange County. 

The output of Orange county for this 
year will be about 1,750,000 barrels. The 
Santa Fe's production in the Fullerton or 
Olinda field is the largest by far. Forty-two 
wells are pumping and the present estimate 
is about 100,000 barrels a month. For the 
earlier part of the year it was less and 70,- 
000 is a good monthly average. Three new 
wells are being drilled and unofficially it 
has been given out that the company will 
endeavor to raise its output to 150,000 a 
month during 1906. 

The Brea Canyon, whose properties lie 
near the county line, is delivering some 20,- 
000 barrels a month to the Santa Fe under 
an old contract. It is capable of producing 
much more, but is only being pumped to 
supply existing contracts. 

Other producers are the Graham and 
Loftus, the Fullerton Consolidated (Charles 
Victor Hall) and the Fullerton. 

Newhall Gusher. 

At Newhall the Standard Oil Company 
early in the year undertook to deepen the 
Pico well, that has produced since the 70's, 
and it turned for a time into a gusher. It 
is still a fine producer. With the exception 
of what the Standard is pumping there is 
very little production. The total is not over 
150,000 barrels. 

Coast Production. 

Ventura county has not produced an aver- 
age of over 1000 barrels a day. Many wells 
have not been pumped steadily. The Union 
has been devoting most of its time to Santa 
Maria and Lompoc and has done but little 
on its old properties in Ventura. 

Santa Maria and Lompoc. 

At Santa Maria and Lompoc production 
has nearly tripled, the two districts being 
spoken of as one. The first part of the year 
witnessed the opening of the Union's Port 
Harford pipe line and the improvement of 
service on the Pacific Coast railway which 
allows the shipment of as much as 10,000 
barrels daily. Last fall the Standard got 
its eight-inch line, run by gravity, to Port 
Harford completed and is taking between 



five an. I seven thousand battel- .1 .1,,, from 
the Western Union and the Pinal undei 

tract and is increasing the amount. It i- 

paying an average price of 40 cents and 
\\ estern Union- levying an assessment only 

six months ago— now pays dividends of 1 

per eent a month, which will soon be greatly 
increased. 

Tin- great llartiiell gusher of the Union 
has produced not less than 1,700,000 barrels 

and is still flowing. At present the Union's 
total output is about 10,000 barrels a day. 

Steamers arrive and depart from Tort Mar- 
ford three or four times a week with oil for 
the Standard's refinery or for the fuel mar- 
ket. 

'I he total storage in the county is about 
[,300,000 barrels, exclusive of some 600,000 
in the great lake formed by the output of 
the gusher penned up by a dam. This is 
drawn upon by shipment from day to day. 
Neither oil or soil is suited for the construc- 
tion of the immense reservoirs used at Kern 
River and steel tankage is necessary, which' 
does not encourage the accumulation of big 
stocks above ground. This together with 
the fact that the conservative Union Oil 
Company owns so much of the territory and 
the fact that nearly all the operators are ex- 
perienced oil men, furnishes ground for the 
belief that development will not be immedi- 
ately pushed to the limit without reference 
to the demand. The cost and time required 
for drilling is also a barrier to this. When 
the writer visited the district early in No- 
vember, sxteen strings of tools were run- 
ning. Wells require often a year for com- 
pletion and are 2000 to 3500 feet deep. 

The oil is mostly from 18 to 28 gravity. 
Some of the lighter properties pass off with 
long exposure to the air as in the case of that 
from the gusher that has stood in the reser- 
voir. That below 24 practically all goes 
to the fuel market, some being first treated 
at the San Francisco refinery. The Pacific 
Coast railway, the narrow gauge line to 
Port Harfard, burns the heaviest crude it 
can get for its locomotives. The . higher 
grades are excellent for refining purposes. 
Lompoc produces a heavier oil for fuel. 

Under the name of the Recruit Oil Com- 
pany, the Associated has acquired large 
tracts, mostly out on the edge of the now 
proven territory where it is doing extensive 
prospecting work. It is too soon to predict 
what success it is likely to meet with. 

The total output of Santa Maria and Lom j 
poc for 1905 is 5,300,000 barrels. At the 
present rate of increase it may approximate 
8,000,000 or more in 1906. If the Union and 
Standard find the market it can be pusehd 
to a still greater amount. 

The Union has always intended to supple- 
ment its present six-inch pipe to Port Har- 
ford with an eeight-inch line. If conditions 
warrant it will be done during 1906, the 
smaller line being used for the lighter gravi- 
ties and the larger one for the heavier prod- 
uct that is at present being shipped over the 
Pacific Coast railroad under a contract 
which expires in July, 1906. 

At Casmalia the Southern Pacific has un- 
covered an oil so heavy that it may almost 
be called tar. It is not above 8 gravity, 
much heavier than the product at Sunset, 
the heaviest found elsewhere in California, 
and heavier than even the lowest gravity 
produced at Ebano, Mexico. It sinks in 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



water and was first found right under water 
at a depth of iooo feet. Drilling to 2700 
feet the company has continued to encounter 
this oil although not continuously. It burns 
well and flows when heated and thousands 
of barrels have been pumped but no attempt 
has been made to put it to practical use. A 
Los Angeles corporation, known as The Oil 
Company, has drilled to 3000 feet without 
result nearby and it is believed that the, 
former well has been located on a fault. 

Summerland. 

The only other production in Santa Bar- 
bara is at Summerland, where about 75,000 
barrels were pumped. The wells are shal- 
low and inexpensive to operate and the pro- 
duct is all consumed locally, largely for 
streets and- roads. 

San Luis Obispo. 

In San Luis Obispo county, seven miles 
northwest of Arroyo Grande, the Tiber Oil 
Co., Capt. J. H. McClurg of Fresno, presi- 
dent, has drilled a well which at 1800 feet is 
flowing fifty barrels of 14 gravity oil a day, 
and is going deeper. The first oil was struck 
at 615 feet and 800 feet of continuous pro- 
ducing sands are reported. The Perpetual, 
another company managed by Capt. Mc- 
Clurg, has found some oil seven miles east 
of Arroyo Grande. 

By a purchase of 2200 acres near the Tiber 
property at a cost of $100,000, the Associated 
has shown its faith in the future of the dis- 
trict. Its lands extend to within two miles 
of the oceaen at Cave Landing' and sixteen 
miles of Port Harford. Two derricks have 
been erected and some extensive prospecting 
will be done within the next year it is very 
likely. 

The Santa Lucia Oil Co. has been drilling 
a well in this county for several months and 
has every promise of bringing in a good 
well. Two other companies have been or- 
ganized to operate in the county and have 
derricks up. The field will doubtless be 
thoroughly tested during the year. 

Enlarging Market. 

But it is in the enlargement of the market 
that the greatest developments are going on. 
During the early part of 1905 the writer 
made a careful canvass of the consumers 
in Los Angeles city and county, getting 
their figures of petroleum used for fuel, 
roads, refining, gas-making, manufacturing 
and roadmaking. In some cases only esti- 
mates based upon past monthly averages 
were obtained but from nearly all the big 
corporations exact data of purchases during 
the previous year were obtained. 

Upon these figures I calculated that not 
less than 2,900,000 barrels would be con- 
sumed during 1905 in Los Angeles. Keep- 
ing in touch with the situation I see no rea- 
son to lower this estimate. 

Of this amount 500,000 were credited to 
local refineries, 500,000 to gas-making, 100,- 
000 to roadwork and the balance for fuel. 
In some cases residuum was probably burn- 
ed and credited by the consumer as crude. 
In gas-making distillates are frequently 
used. 

No attempt was made to figure out the 
consumption of the three steam railroads, 
the Southern Pacific, Sante Fe and. Salt 
Lake. When the amount of this south of 
the Tehachapi is included and the amount 



used in other counties is estimated it is like- 
ly that the oil used in Southen California 
will be found to have been over 4,500.000, 
perhaps 5.000,000 barrels. I only give these 
last as an unverified estimate. 

Xo figures are available as to previous 
years, but the increase is certainly great. 
The completion of the Salt Lake railroad 
alone has added many thousands of barrels 
to consumption. Oil is burned on all en- 
gines as far as Las Vegas, Nevada, where 
the line is drawn on account of the com- 
petition of Utah coal. The growth of popu- 
lation has compelled great enlargements of 
the electric light and power systems, street 
railroads, gas works and every line of public 
utilities. Every new public building, every 
industry, pumping plants, hotel or other es- 
tablishment of almost every kind, means 
more demand for oil or its products, so it 
can be seen, by reference to the growth of 
Los Ang'eles and all the surrounding coun- 
try, that the increase must be very great. 

Not less than 85 per cent of the total 
amount of business in crude and refined oil 
done in the city is in the hands of the Stand- 
ard, Union and Associated companies, the 
last including the Amalgamated. In fuel 
the Associated has the major portion of the 
business, furnishing crude direct from its 
local wells by pipe line to the city and to 
many big consumers direct. The Lmion 
brings in much from Whittier and Fullerton 
by pipe, while the Standard supplies large 
quantities of residuum from Point Rich- 
mond without trying to control the market 
to the exclusion of competition. 

Much of the crude used here is a high 
gravity with low flash test and the city oil 
inspector has declared to the municipal 
council that the city is in great danger from 
this source. The Associated has, however, 
anticipated this, if the claim be true, as to 
which I express no opinion, by beginning the 
treatment of its Salt Lake oil, removing its 
lighter properties. For this purpose it has 
leased the old Texas-California refinery and 
is erectinng a larger plant of its own with 
which it expects to be able to treat 6000 
barrels a day. Besides a lower g'ravity of 
fuel a satisfactory road oil is an important 
object in building this plant. Hitherto the 
Associated has refrained from invading this 
trade. 

What other purposes this plant may be 
used for is yet uncertain, but it seems un- 
likely that any attempt will be made to 
manufacture bi-products in competition with 
the Standard. 

For gas-making Whittier oil has acquired 
a high reputation on account of its freedom 
from sulphur. It is used by the Edison 
Company exclusively for this purpose. The 
Amalgamated Company is furnishing oil to 
the Los Angeles Gas Company, the largest 
consumer. The erection .of the refinery may 
mean that efforts will be made to free the 
gas oil from sulphur. 

At present fuel is delivered in the city at 
from 39 to 48 cents under contracts. There 
are a number of three-year contracts at 40 
to 45 cents with the Amalgamated. In sur- 
rounding towns delivery is made at 50 to 60 
cents. At the wells 35 cents is considered 
an average price. 

The Refined Trade. 
In Los Angeles or immediate vicinity 



there arc some twelve refineries of varying 
capacity. Some of these are running stead- 
ily, others only part of the time, while oth- 
ers still have been entirely or almost entire- 
ly shut down for a long period. The busi- 
ness is in a very depressed condition on ac- 
count of the fierce competition of the Stand- 
ard, which has captured over 85 per cent of 
the trade and prices have dropped to a ruin- 
ous plane. 

Asphalt is of course an important product. 
Some is consumed locally and some is sent 
East. Rates have fallen from $12 and $13 
to $6 to $7 a ton, because of overproduction. 
The manufacture of an inferior article by 
some one has also had the effect of prejudic-. 
ing many Eastern people against all "oil" 
asphalt. This, however, it is expected, will 
be overcome since knowledge of the busi- 
ness has improved and the inferior manu- 
facturers forced out. 

Very little illuminating oil is made. The 
chief attention is given to engine and stove 
distillates, lubricants, insecticides, and var- 
ous articles. Gasoline is also made to some 
extent. The Standard is bringing untold 
quantities of refined goods in by sea. Steam- 
ers from Point Richmond unloaded at Re- 
dondo every few days and trainloads of 
Standard products are hauled to the city 
over the Santa Fe and go hence over all rail- 
roads to all parts of Southern California. 
Some illuminants come in from Pennsyl- 
vania and other products from Point Rich- 
mond refinery. The Puente, the Standard's 
chief competitor, also imports some Eastern 
oil for illuminating purposes. 

Since one year ago on April 1st last, prices 
of engine and stove distillates have fallen 
from the former rates of 11 to 14 cents to 
5 to 7 1 /. cents a gallon. On that date the 
Standard's contract with the Puente ended 
and open war began. Stations have been es- 
tablished in the various farming districts 
where pump irrigation is the rule and wag- 
on delivery is being made to ranchers, in 
some cases over ten mile hauls, as low as 6 
cents a gallon. In the city bulk kerosene 
is delivered at 7V2 cents and canned goods 
sell at proportionate rates. Gasoline in five- 
gallon cans ranges from 80 cents to $1.25, or 
16 to 25 cents a gallon. Similar conditions 
prevail in most cities of Southern California. 
The Standard is leaving nothing undone to 
capture the entire trade in refined goods, 
while doing a moderate business in fuel. At 
the same time it is buying nothing from the 
local small producers and the only crude it 
gets south of the Tehachepi comes from its 
own wells at Newhall. 

In Arizona a good trade is being worked 
up in crude fuel by the Associated and Los 
Angeles is the center of much of this. In 
the mining camps there is a good trade in 
distillates for which the Standard and local 
refineries compete. 

Local refineries get their supplies at home. 
Two are owned by companies producing at 
Whittier and use this oil. The Puente also 
has its own wells. Some Amalgamated oil 
is also sold for refining and a small quan- 
tity of Santa Maria product has been 
brought in. 

At San Diego the Union has brought 
some crude by ship from Port Harford for 
fuel, although more of this is going north 
and into the South American trade that the 
Union has worked up. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



13 



CO AUNG A 






1 1 L Coalinga field lias shown a 

Omost remarkable growth and 
prosperity during the year 
1905. Its production increased 
throe millions of barrels over that of [904 
'and the limits of the field wore extended 
proportionately. Several wells of the gusher 
order were brought in, adding rapidly to 
the daily production, so that at the close of 
it was more than double that at the 

Yet every barrel is eagerly 
sough) for by the purchasing companies at 

prevailing prices, with a good part tied up 
in contracts at very good figures. While 
ssing all the earmarks of a prosperous 
ami growing field, there is but little of the 
"boom" element in evidence, and what does 
spring up from time to time is quickly 
squelshed by the prevailing spirit of con- 
servatism. 

The town has a permanent and floating 
population of about 1500 persons. The 
streets were graded and oiled by the county 
last spring. There arc some concrete side- 
walks in the business part of town, and sev- 
eral brick buildings. The R. H. Hcrron 
Company, S. R. Bowen manager, has a sup- 
ply house, warehouse and yard. The Na- 
tional Supply Company has a warehouse, 
vard and store in charge of Mr. William 
Zimmerman, manager. These houses carry 
a full line of oil well supplies. The Union 
( )il Tool Company of Los Angeles has es- 
tablished a fishing tool house here under the 
management of Mr. Tom O'Donnald. R. H. 
Herron Co. has taken over the Coalinga 
( )il Tool Works, doing a general repair and 
manufacturing business of oil wells tools. 
The Bunting Iron Works is a very com- 
plete plant, the best in the state outside of 
Los Angeles.. They have installed a com- 
plete boiler shop to handle their increased 
business in the boiler line. They handle 
the city water supply and they own the 
electric lighting system. The stability of 
the field is well illustrated by the big shop. 
When such men as John A. Bunting will in- 
vest the amount that this plant represents it J 
is very fair evidence of permanency. The 
management is in the hands of Capt. J. F. 
Lucey, a man popular among the oil men 
of the field. There are two large merchan- 
dise stores that carry a well selected stock 
of goods sold at prices quite reasonable, an 
up-to-date drug store, W. W. Ayers, phar- 
maceutist, and a number of other stores. 
The Bank of Coalinga was opened on Au- 
gust 1st, 1905, and is doing a thriving busi- 
ness. Mr. S. E. Biddle, Jr., is manager and 
Mr. H. C. Kerr cashier. There are hotels, 
rooming houses, livery stables, blacksmith 
shops and enough saloons to supply any 
town. A nice little mining town, where the 
accommodations arc much better than what 
we found in the '6o's. 

Field Conditions. 

The first well on the west side of the 
Coalinga field was "drilled in" by the Confi- 
dence Oil Company on Section 31, Township 
ic), Range 15. The success of this venture 
encouraged others until to-day we have an 
ever expanding territory reaching from the 
Lucil property on the south to the Limited 
wells em Section 2<) for the west side and 
on northeasterly to the Tavern well on Sec- 



tion 14. Township 10. Range 15. a distance 

of over eleven miles. From the M.. Is. & 

T. ( >il Company on Section 8, Township jo. 

Range 15. on the east, through the Califor- 
nia and New York ( >il Company's on Sec- 
tion 12, Township jo. Range 14. to the t oa- 

linga Petroleum Company on Section 12, 

Township jo. Range 14. two miles in width. 
that is contributing to the production of the 
Coalinga field. A dry hole i^ seldom heard 
of: a few wells have been lost in drilling. 
'There is no "stocks" in this field ; no re- 
serve ; the oil has found a read) market ; this 
field is to-day one of the most inviting oil 
fields of the country. 'The market is made 
for the oil, and prices must advance. At 
one time in ( >il (reek. Pa., the producer was 
forced to meet the low prices prevailing for 
want of a market, five cents per barrel. The 
market was made and to-day the same oil 
demands $1.48. Low prices creates mar- 
kets ; economy of fuel oil over coal creates 
demand, which in turn makes prices. We 
asked an oil man last week, who has visited 
practically all of the oil fields of the world, 
this question: "What is the life of an oil 
well in California as against the Eastern 
field?" His answer was direct : "The East- 
ern field, as a rule, has shallow sands and 
five years is considered an average life, 
while here in Coalinga we get as much as 
700 feet of' producing sand well saturated 
with oil. Twenty years is an average life 
for wells in this state. There are wells in 
California producing to-day that have been 
producing for the past thirty years." 

There is no oil stored in this field. Ora 
Station, where several of the big companies 
have tanks, there is practically no oil. The 
large earth reservoir built by the Southern 
Pacific Railroad has never had oil in it, 
though it was built for storage, and is said 
to have a capacity of 500,000 barrels. There 
is no oil here for storage ; it is all moved as 
fast as produced. There is no overproduc- 
tion ; that is a fallacy as concerns this field. 
The ever widening market has reached the 
smelters of ore ; the furnace and the forge 
has increased our home market; it has made 
manifest the economy in the great water 
ways ; has encompassed the iron horse that 
snorts its way across the continent ; has in- 
vaded the kitchen of our hotels ; has en- 
tered the avenues of every ' industry, atsd 
shall stay as long as steam shall drive the 
wheels of ocean liners or turn the shafts 
of manufacturing industries. 

A company has been organized to develop 
a large deposit of Fullers' earth. The mine 
is situated about eleven miles east of here. 
Some very inviting contracts have been 
closed for the product. H. C. Kerr, cashier 
of the Coalinga Bank; Robert Hays Smith, 
oil operator ; G. W. Davis, liveryman, and 
other citizens of Coalinga are behind the 
company. We have a telephone system that 
extends all over the field ; it is in control of 
Coalinga Telephone Company, J. N Wheeler 
manager. There are eighty-four phones in- 
stalled ; they have 246 miles of wire strung 
and are adding from time to time phones and 
wire to extend the lines. 

There are nine pipe lines for the delivery 
of oil to the market from this field with 
over fifty miles of "gathering" lines that 
reach out to nearly every producing prop- 
perty in the field. 

The P. O. C. Company has two lines to 
Mendota on the main line of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad, each about forty miles long, 
one a six-inch, the other an eight-inch. They 



tap the line from Kern River field at Men- 
dota that delivers oil to the Stan. lard ( >il 

( ompanj at Point Richmond on San I 

CISCO Bay, 'They have about fifteen miles 
of "gathering" lines over the easl side. 

'The Union Oil Company has two four 

inch lines that delivers oil into its tanks 
at Ora Station on the Southern Pacific Rail- 
road, with gathering lines, amounting in till 
to about seventeen miles. 

'The C. < >. T. Company (Associated) pipe 
line to Monterey Bay, 110 miles, with about 
fifteen miles of gathering lines. 

"The Independent Pipe line of the Califor- 
nia Monarch ( >il Company has a four-inch 
pipe line to ( )ra Station, about seven miles 
long, with about two miles of gathering 
lines. 

The California Oil Fields (Limited) has a 
four-inch line to Ora Station, with gathering 
lines, about seventeen miles. 

The Standard Oil Company has a three- 
inch pipe line from Oil City to Ora Station*; 
about eight and one-half miles long. 

The Associated Oil Company has a seven 
and five-eighth-inch pipe line to Ora Station, 
about seven miles, with three miles of gath- 
ering lines. 

Following is the production of crude oil 
in the Coalinga field by months:. 

Barrels. 

January 604,000 

February 590,000 

March 654,000 

April 648,000 

May 699,000 

June 798,000 

July 804,000 

August 81 5,000 

September 816,000 

October 835,000 

November 811,000 

December (estimated) 795,000 

Total for year 8,869,000 

The slight decline the past two months is 
due to the shutting down of some of the 
wells on account of the low price of oil. 
The Active Companies. 

The following companies are actively en- 
gaged in the development of this field, to- 
wit : 

All in T. 21 S., R. 14 E. 

Mt. Hamilton Land and Oil Company, in 
Section 14, 1600 feet of pipe in and are work- 
ing in blue clay. They have let a contract 
to go deeper. 

All in T. 21 S., R. 15 E. 

Lucile Oil Company, Section 6, have over 
2000 feet of eight-inch pipe in hole. Indi- 
cations good for a well within 200 feet. 
All in T. 20 S., R. 14 E. 

Fresno-San Francisco Oil Company: four 
producing wells. 

Penn-Coalinga Oil Company, Section 1. 
have four producing wells. 

Cvpress Oil Company, Section 1, has one 
producing well and one well drilling. This 
property was recently taken over by the R. 
H. Herron Company. 

Zier Oil Company, Section I, two wells 
producing. 

Roberts Oil Company, Section 1, two 
wells producing. 

Shawmut Oil Company, Section 12, four 
wells producing. Contemplate drilling No. 
5 during early part of 1906. 

Bunting & Brix (Ail Company. Section I 
well Xo. 1 is producing, a flowing well. Well 



14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



No. 2 will be finished early in the spring. 

California and New York Oil Company, 
Section 12 ; well No. 1 is a flowing well ; it 
is reported to be the best well on the west 
side. Well No. 2, brought in last Novem- 
ber, is estimated at about 300 barrels. Well 
No. 3 is being drilled. They have a fine 
boiler plant fired by gas, trapped from No. 
1. A very economically worked property. 

Union Oil Company, Section 13, have five 
wells producing and one drilling. This is 
one of the big companies and under the ef- 
ficient management of Tom O'Donnald. 

Coalinga Petroleum Oil Company, Sec- 
tion 14, has one producing well. 

Coalinga Western Oil Company, Section 
23, five producing wells ; heavy oil, but 
much sought after. 

.St. Paul-Fresno Oil Company, Section 23, 
two producing wells ; recently installed a 
large line pump to force their oil through 
the line ; they have put in a fine sixty-horse- 
power boiler, which would indicate fuither 
development. 

Wabash Oil Company, Section 24, tour 
producing wells, flowing : one rmmplisg, one 
well drilling. 

Inca Oil Company, Section 24, two pro- 
ducing wells. 

S. P. R. R. Company, Section 25. This 
property was formerly owned by Cory & 
Canfield. They were unwiling to comply 
with the terms of their lease. The S. P. 
have rerigged the property, put up buildings 
and will operate for the production. 

Blue Diamond Oil Company, Section 26; 
there is a watchman upon the property. 

Caledonia Oil Company, Section 26, two 
wells making oil. 

Cawdor Developing Company, Section 26. 
one well flowing. 

All in T. 20 S., R. 15 E. 

W. & K. Oil Company, Section 2, one 
well in oil sand; fine showing; have 2500 
feet of four and one-half-inch pipe in hole. 

Mercantile Crude Oil Company, Section 
6, four producing wells ; good territory. 

Yoak Coalinga Oil Company, Section 6, 
has two good wells producing. 

S. W. & B. Oil Company, Section 6, have 
two wells producing; good property. 

New San Francisco Crude Oil Company, 
Section 6, has four good wells ; they have 
let a contract to drill well No. 5. Have in- 
stalled a new sixty-horsepower boiler. 

Esperanza Oil and Gas Company, Section 
6, seven wells producing; will drill No. 8 
early in the spring. The production has 
doubled during the present management ; is 
a valuable property. 

Section Seven Oil Company, Section 7, 
one of the companies having fine production. 
Their No. 1 well has been a very fine pro- 
ducer. They have four producers and rig 
up for No. 5. 

Coalinga Pacific Oil Company, Section 7, 
two wells flowing; one well drilling. 

Porter & Scribner Oil Company, Section 
7 (formerly Nathan Oil Company), one well 
producing; one well drilling; contemplates 
drilling four or five wells the coming year. 

M., K. & T. Oil Company, Section 8, one 
well flowing. This well is over 2800 feet 
with four and a half inch pipe in well. One 
rig up and ready for the drill ; two new 
eighty-horsepower boilers are installed ; the 
buildings are among the best in the field ; 
neat, convenient and tasty. 

Coalinga Consolidated Water Company, 



Section 16. Gen. R. L. Peeler, field man- 
ager. The Pioneer Water Company, 
started by a group of local capitalists, 
headed by Capt. McCreery, intended at first 
to supply those companies operating around 
the Home Oil Company. It has gradually 
enlarged its sphere until now, with four 
water wells, each with twenty-one miles of 
pipe lines, it permeates every part of the 
known field. It has expended several thou- 
sand dollars the past year in bettering its 
service, laying out pipe lines, installing new 
machinery and developing more water. 
All in T. ig S., R. 14 E. 

Redding Oil Company, Section 36 (for- 
merly Philadelphia and San Francisco Oil 
Company), have three producing wells; will 
shortly commence drilling No. 4. 
All in T. 19 S., R. 15 E. 

Section 10 Oil Company, Section 10, has 
derrick up ; expect to commence develop- 
ment in the spring of 1906. 

Kaweah Oil Company, Section 14 (known 
as the Tavern by many), well No. 1 is a 
good producer, estimated at 500 barrels ; 
light oil; well No. 2 drilling; down 1300 
feet (December 15.) 

Avon Oil Company, Section 14, have two 
producing wells. 

Coast Range Oil Company, Section 17, 
have two wells pumping; light oil. 

Coalinga Oil Company, Section 20. This 
is the pioneer oil company, the discovering 
company of the pool of light oil on the east 
side. They have nine wells producing; will 
drill in a new well this spring; oil gravity 
as high as 35 degrees. 

Home Oil Company, Section 20, have 
eight wells producing; they will drill two 
more wells the coming season. The wells 
have recently held up their production in 
fine form ; 35 degree gravity oil. 

California Oil Fields Company (Limited), 
Section 9, 15, 19, 21, 27 and 25, Township 19, 
Range 15, thirty-eight producing wells, four 
drilling and two new derricks. This is the 
banner company of the Coalinga field and 
represents the major portion of the produc- 
tion. It is backed principally by English 
capital. Is probably the largest independent 
producer in the state, with the exception of 
the Union Oil Company of California, which 
has a large production in other fields. 

Peerless Oil Company, Section 22, has 
seven producing wells and one drilling. 

Octave Oil Company, Section 22, have 
one producing well, one drilling. 

Sauer Dough Oil Company, Section 22, a 
fine property ; have five producing wells. 

Caribou Oil Company, Section 22, nine 
producing wells ; a very fine property. 

Twenty-two Oil Company, Section 22, 
have a rig up ; reported will soon commence 
drilling their No. I well. 

Record Oil Company, Section 22 ; they 
have one well ; promises to be a producer. 

Miller & Hannah Oil Company, Section 
24, have a rig up on the northwest quarter; 
will beign operations early in 1906. 

New England and Coalinga Oil Company, 
Section 24, have a rig up on the northeast 
quarter; report has it that they will soon 
develop. 

Pittsburg Oil Company, Section 24, well 
No. 1 is drilling; deep territory should be 
high grade oil. 

Montana Oil Company, Section 24, N°- 1 
drilling. 

Northeastern Oil Company, Section 26, 



well No. 1 went into the oil sand at about 
2400 feet. 

Arline Oil Company, Section 26, they are 
deepening their No. I in hopes of cutting 
the lower sand which proved so rich in the 
well No. 23 of the Limited ; No. 2 shut off 
water at about 1500 feet; oil is about 18 
gravity. 

California Monarch Oil Company, Sec- 
tion 26, their well No. 1 is about 1950 feet 
with eight-inch drive pipe. 

Twenty-Eight Oil Company, Section 28 
has 14 producing wells. 

Stockholders Oil Co., Section 28 (former- 
ly Roberts Oil Co.), has three producing 
wells and one drilling. 

Independence Oil Company, Section 28, 
eight producing wells ; oil from 18 to 21 
gravity ; rig up for new well. 

Oil City Petroleum Company, Section 
28, ten fine producers and one drilling; an 
excellent property. 

Hanford Oil Company, Section 28, has 
eight producing wells ; fine territory. 

Tuna Oil Company, Section 28, rig up foi 
No. 1 ; soon to commence operating. 

Aetna Oil Company, Section 30, have one 
well producing. 

Commercial Petroleum Company, Sec- 
tion 31, eight wells producing; good prop- 
erty. 

California Diamond Oil Company, Sec- 
tion 31 (formerly R. V. Ellis), have one 
producing well and are drilling well No. 2 ; 
this is good property ; joins the California 
Monarch Oil Company on the east. 

California Monarch Oil Company, Sec- 
tion 31 (formerly the Main State Oil Com- 
pany and the Guthery Oil Company), have 
twelve wells producing and drilling; this 
company owns and operates the Independ- 
ent Pipe Line of the California Monarch Oil 
Company that delivers oil to their tanks at 
Ora Station on the S. P. R. R. They have 
several good contracts for fuel oil. 

Confidence Oil Company, Section 31, have 
two pumping wells and one well flowing; 
their No. 1 well was the pioneer well of 
the West side. 

El Zuma Puro Oil Company, Section 31, 
^have four producing wells ; they intend to 
drill several wells the coming season. 

K. & C. Oil Company, Section 31, have 
been absorbed by the Confidence Oil Com- 
pany ; have four producing wells ; will clean 
and bring in one more well. 

Murdock Oil Company, Section 31, has 
absorbed the El Capitan, Genessee and the 
Producers' Oil Company ; has three produc- 
ing wells and contemplate drilling three 
more soon. 

Forty Oil Company, Section 25, has two 
producing wells. 

Pittsburg-Coalinga Oil Company, Sec- 
tion 34, one producing well ; one drilling 
well. 

McCreery Oil Company, Section 34, have 
one producing well. 

Oyama Oil Company, Section 34, one well 
drilling; are in oil sand about 1900 feet 
deep. 

Westmoreland-Coalinga Oil Company, 
Section 34, three wells producing. 

Missouri-Coalinga Oil Company, Section 
34, one well producing. 

Call Oil Company, Section 32, has one 
well producing; will soon commence drill- 
ing its No. 2. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



'5 



California and New York Oil Company, 
Con. 



The California and New York Oil Com- 
pany, Con., have demonstrated that co-op- 
eration and careful management will pro- 
duce a legitimate profit from oil land, if tin- 
oil land is properly located. This company 
has valuable holdings in the Coalinga oil 



"drilled in," showing good oil, splendid pro- 
duction and a wonderful gas pressure with 
the production increasing. She shows up 
fully as well as did No, 1 at her age. 
Well No. 3 is being drilled on the 
south line of the property; they are now 
(January 3d) about 550 feet with ten-inch 
drive pipe. They have a complete water 
system, having drilled in a water well, which 




Reservoirs of Oil on the California and New York Oil Co.'s property, Sec. 12, 20-14, 

Coalinga. District. 



outs; during one of these blowouts (June 
jim 1 it was estimated by disinterested ana 
conservative oil men that sin- was doing 

about 6000 barrels per day, or more. This IS 

a great well and has done a large amount of 

oil. The) have her harnessed and under 

control; it is predicted by every one that she 

will make the best record of any well in the 

field. 

The oil and gas from this well is not of the 

same gravity as that produced from the 
other well upon same and adjoining prop- 
erty. Their wells Nos. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, IO, It 
and 12 are producing. Well No. 11 was 
cleaned and finished last October. No. 12, 
the new well, was finished in November and 
went to producing immediately. Well No. 
2 has been a steady producer since last Feb- 
ruary, and i:j located on the northern part 
of the property. Well No. 4, a new welP 
just completed, is a fine producer; also on 
the north part' of the property. Well No. 11 
is a produce: ' of a fine gravity of oil. Well 
No. 12, the recently completed new well, 
has produced from the start at a 400-barrel 
clip. These last two wells are on the south 
end of the property on 31-19-15. This proves 
this entire property, which is a mile long, 
to be very rich. The company has made 
some very advantageous contracts for oil 
and the management is pushing the produc- 



field, a part of which is being developed to 
the full satisfaction of all parties interested. 
Their No. I well, on Section 12, Township 
20, Range 14, came in last March. She de- 
livered a total for April of from 40,000 to 
50,000 barrels of fine fuel oil, and has flowed 



MSI y |i^ m 

id Wat ' \ 4 * ; 

&•**/■ *<— i Lot * ! 


m. .!" i j? 


W\ lixmmM Wtwk \ Wi 

ml itmMmrm 1 Si 1 1 iZ i' H wri 

If jIKmh By*9 HU-^iM> ; ) E '-' 



ow Out of Well No. 1 of the California Monarch 
Oil Co., Sec. 31, 19-15, Coalinga. 

uninterruptedly ever since. Few wells have 
held their production and delivered their oil 
with as little expense as has this well. The 
oil has found a ready market at fair price, 
and the small cost of operating has made it 
a very profitable piece of property. Their 
well No. 2, just west of No. i, has been 



supplies their plant and leaves them a large 
surplus of water for sale. They have com- 
pleted a centerilizer boiler plant, using gas 
for fuel ; have laid their water, gas, oil and 
steam lines under ground, buried in oil sand. 
It is one of the most economically managed 
"properties in this field. To the untiring de- 
votion to the business interests of the com- 
pany by the management, which includes 
the wise selection of competent men to drill 
the property and to handle the company's 
interest, is due the wonderful success met 
in financing this enterprise. - The keen, in- 
telligent spirit of co-operation existng be- 
tween the fiscal agents in the East with the 
general manager and attorney in the West 
has clearly demonstrated their policy of op- 
eration. Mr. John J. Meyers, general man- 
ager of the properties; Mr. C. F. Humph- 
rey, legal adviser, have had control of the 
combined interests on the coast, while 
Messrs. A. L. Wisner & Co. of 32 Broad- 
way, New York City, who have a very large 
clientage, gathered through several years of 
successful operating, have financed this com- 
pany. Mr. Guy H. Salisbury, assistant man- 
ager, has charge of the company's interests 
in the field. 

California Monarch Oil Co. 

California Monarch Oil Company, under 
the same management that so successfully 
launched the California and New York Oil 
Companies, have, since their incorporation 
June 7th, 1905, more than trebled the pro- 
duction of their property in Section 31, 
Township 19, Range 15. Their well No. I, 
the "Monarch Gusher," has had four blow- 




Gushing Well and River of Oil from same on tie 
California Monarch Oil Co.'s property, Coalinga. 

tion of their property to meet the demand. 
This company is drilling a well on Sec. 26, 
Tp. 19, Range 15. They are 2000 feet deep 
with eight-inch drive pipe, and going nicely. 



i6 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



This territory is in the light grade district, 
the oil of which is valuable, being sold to the 
P. C. O. Company (Standard) for their re- 
finery at Point Richmond. The company 
has proven and prospective oil land in the 
Coalinga district amounting to over 2400 
acres. 

The management of this property employs 
none but first-class men, who are skilled in 
their particular lines, which enables them to 
successfully and economically handle the 
business from which they have made a 
wide experience and a State reputation as a 




Property of the California Diamond Oil Co., 
Sec. 31, 19-15, Coalinga 

successful oil well superintendent, has 
charge of the development and production of 
the company's interests in Coalinga. 

California Diamond Oil Co. 

California Diamond Oil Co. has 60 acres 
of absolutely proven land lying immediately 
south of the Commercial Pet. Oil Company 
and east of the California Monarch Oil Com- 
pany, in Section 31; Township 19, Range 15. 
They have one fine producing well rated as 
a 300 barrel. They are 800 feet deep with 
their No. 2 well with ten-inch drive pipe. 
This is absolutely proven territory and equal 
in value per acre to the famous California 
Monarch Oil Co.'s property, which im- 
mediately adjoins it on the west. In 
the Sunset district, Kern County, the com- 
pany has a very highly productive property 
with two flowing wells ; the production is 01 
the lightest gravity of oil in the district. The 
wells have an estimated production of about 



500 barrels daily, and a shallow territory 
enabling the management to "drill in" a well 
at a low cost. These wells produce from an 
"open bottom," they have not been perfo- 
rated ; they have over 400 feet of oil sand 
to draw from, almost inexhaustible. They 
now have a stock of oil on hand estimated at 
50,000 barrels. These wells are considered 
to be among the best in this district. The 
company has three complete drilling rigs, 
engine house and machine shop completely 
fitted ; a dwelling, bunk house and office, and 
are fully prepared for the successful and 
economic drilling of wells. This company 
is being managed and financed by the same 
conservative gentlemen who have so suc- 
cessfully managed the California and New 
York Oil Company and the California Mon- 
arch Oil Company. 



MEXICO 



ON account of the fact that a great 
deal of California capital has 
been invested in the oil industry 
in Mexico a review at this time 
may be opportune. We shall, in the future, 
publish monthly letters from our southern 
sister republic. 

Senor Miguel Bustaniante, Jr., professor 
of chemistry in School of Mines (govern- 
ment), claims he is at least morally con- 
vinced from the presence of schist in the 
formation at Texcoc that great quantities of 
crude petroleum must be discovered there. 
He also stands high as authority on geology 
and survey. 

Several parties have attempted to over- 
come the prohibitory decision of the church 
authorities at Guadalupe in order to resume 
drilling back of the church at that place, at 
base of the great rock where nearby stands 
the sail of legendary fame in connection 
with the supposed spot at which the Guada- 
lupe Virgin is said to have hailed the Shep- 
herd Indian. Oil was really found there 
in the well drilled four years ago, now cov- 
ered up and concealed, due to the "Catholic 
religious scruples" of that thought, and the 
ignorant supposition of its consequent dan- 
ger should it flow in quantities. As a mat- 
ter of fact the oil was semi-transparent, 
probably 45 deg. Baume, burned with fa- 
cility in an ordinary table lamp, as dozens 
of natives at Guadalupe testify. Its semi- 
refined state was theoretically explained by 
action of subterranean thermal springs and 
natural filtration. 

Huichapam, Hidalgo.— Heavy black as- 
phalt of "about 10 deg. Baume was recently 



discovered on one of the estates and may be 
characterized as a tar spring of no impor- 
tance in present condition. 

"EI Encinal," Michoacan. — Exploration 
work and drilling is to be placed on a wider 
scope in this field by the European company 
now exploring the state in general for crude 
petroleum which has been known to exist 
there fifteen years ago in the semi-carbonif- 
erous districts. 

Sonora and Sinaloa. — Reports of new dis- 
coveries of oil and tar springs in these two 
states are frequently heard, details at pres- 
ent are not obtainable. Sonora has great 
coal fields and the reports of oil may be 
given credence without a doubt. 

Guerrero. — Notice has been taken of the 
oil springs, near Magdalena, on one of the 




Flowing Wells Nos. 1 and 2 of the California 
Diamond Oil Co., Sunset District. 

large estates, and local capital has ordered 
drilling rigs and other paraphernalia to ex- 
plore the district, aided by the moral support 
and good will of the state's inhabitants and 
government. In character it is very similar 
to the oil springs further down the Coast at 
Puerto Angel, Oaxaca. Brownish color and 
about 14 deg. gravity at surface. This is 
one if not the most naturally resourceful 
state of the republic. It's metallurgical 
wealth yet unexplored is astounding. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Oaxaca. 1 »riUii)Lr is ln-ini^ actively pi 
I at Puerto Angel for crude petroleum 
by the Puerto Angel Petroleum Co., capital- 
ized at $100,000 ( Mex. sil.), all local capital. 
Surface oil seepages .ire visible from Po- 
chutla vicinity, continuously on the waj to 
Puerto Angel, site of present operations, 
This company lias secured property for miles 
around ami must eventually strike the nil 
Strata, calculated at <kx> miter- (2700 feet I . 
It-, color i- brown, rather visCOS, \aries from 
I J t.. 20 gravity, and must carry very little 

ine distillate-. Thompson Bros, has 

the drilling bj contract aided bv a corps of 
experienced men from the Indian Territory. 
Success ha- crowned their efforts so tar in 
sinking a straight hole to approximately 400 
meters 1 1200 feet I as the inclineed seaward 
strata has heretofore given untold trouble 

and defeat to previous driller-. This will 
eventually prove to he a productive district 
of primary importance, a competitor to Cali- 
fornia products, as indication- so far are 
this oil is a fine lubricant and lighter oil will 
he had at lower strata, as almost unlimited 
capital hacks this company. Any reunite 
date will find a refinery established there, 
after sufficient exploration work has been 
made. 

Juxtlahuaca.— Messrs. Diaz and Sala have 
purchased ( laxaca's most important anthra- 
cite coal zone, embracing; approximately 180 
square leagues in this and adjoining dis- 
tricts. Experts and engineers have been in 
the field on preliminary work, routing the 
course of their projected railroad to the Pa- 
cific port of Tecuanapa, Oaxaca City, and 
other terminals. Unlimited capital supports 
the undertaking and will open up a promis- 



ing territory of freights in cattle, cotton. 
timber and tine wood-, metal from the large 
mine- worked in colonial times and now 
idle from lack of -hipping facilities. The 
officers of t'is concern arc at No. 28 Calle 

( Irtega. Mexico Cilv . 

Ejutla. — The Tezuitlan Copper Co. has 

bought "Las < Vote-" copper mine for a cool 
half million Mexican pesos (cash). This 
mine has produced quite as much in two 
years of amalgamated ore, copper, gold and 

silver, and continues purchasing mines and 
other claims close bv in the district, which 
has millions invested and appears to be the 

most substantal copper district in the state. 

Zimatlan District has come to the front 
as a gold producer after a long sleep dating 
back to colonial days. The Mixtepec pro- 
\ inces have had probably 2,000 claims staked 
out in the past six months. Sr. Barroso at 
Zimatlan has taken out gold ore running up 
to $S.ooo a ton. San Bernardino appears to 
be the "hub" of all this phenomenal discov- 
crv. I saw plenty of oxide ore carrying free 
gold in grains and flakes. 

Operations are very active here, as ma- 
chinery, stamps, turbines, etc., are being 
erected galore. Water rights are and have 
been denounced by the score for power pur- 
poses here, as the absence of pyrites so far 
gives every evidence of a free milling ore. 
Experienced miners and capital have taken 
possesion and made it the busiest camp in 
the state. Pay ore is frequently encountered 
at grass roots here at San Bernardino. 

Messrs. Delalama and Zwicker of Mexico 
City have fortunately acquired some most 
valuable claims before the "rush." 



Mr. Carlos Franck has also staked on: 

claims of the I'iwatrr. 

A vi-it on the grounds savors stronglj 
of early California gold discovery. 

Tabasco. — While here I visited the San 
Fernando district and find Air. George Dick- 
son, C. F... formerly superintendent general 
of the Waters Pierce < : il Co. in charge of 
field exploration work for crude oil. con- 
ducted bv S. Pearson's Sons' Limited • 0. ol 
London. 1 was informed they had got down 
to |O0 meters and had struck a 34 deg. crude 
oil, which is largel) destined to be a lubri- 
cant, light and heavy ; its color is deep, dark 
red and undoubtedly carries a large percent- 
age of parafine. This well was sold by Diaz 
& Sala. June last, for $30,000, to the com- 
pany, with only .1 150-foot hide, emitting oil 
of 20 to 22 gravity. Apparently the operat- 
ing and development programme of this 
concern is very extensive, as they are build- 
ing storage tanks at Vera Cruz port and a 
refinery in operation at San Juan Bautista, 
the inland water port nearest to San Fer s 
nando (about eight miles off). Surface 
seepages of oil are prevalent all over this 
section, which must become one of Mexico's 
greatest crude oil producers. An eminent 
authority foresees a future equal to West 
Virginia for this field, as the crude is a nat- 
ural lubricant direct from the well and a 
close duplicate in color and test to the so- 
called Atlantic red oil. 

Diaz and Sala, of Ortega 28, Mexico City, 
still hold large tracts of territory immedi- 
ately adjoining Pearson's wells at practically 
sea level, and there are rumors of another 
large deal passing through their hands in 
this field. ENDINGTON. 



A GREAT MINE 



Fabulously rich tellurium ore was recently discovered in the 
BULLFROG "EXTENSION MINE. The property is known and 
acknowledged to be one of the very best of the entire Bullfrog dis- 
trict. The shares of this company is the best buy in Bullfrog to- 
day. THE MINE IS A SURE WINNER. YES! AN ABSO- 
LUTELY SURE WINNER BECAUSE A GREAT MINE HAS 
ALREADY BEEN DEVELOPED. A PROSPECTUS, RE- 
PORTS OF ENGINEERS OF NATIONAL REPUTATION, 
PRESS NOTICES OF THE GREATEST PAPERS OF THE 
UNITED STATES WILL PROVE TO YOU THAT THE MINE 
IS ONE OE THE GREATEST OF THE DISTRICT. WRITE 
FOR THIS MATTER TODAY. ONLY A SMALL BLOCK OF 
STOCK OFFERED AND IT IS GOING FAST. THIS STOCK 
CAN BE PLACED ONLY TO A LIMITED NUMBER OF SUB- 
SCRIBERS. 

WE ARE MAKING A SPECIAL OFFER WHEREBY YOU 
CAN SECURE A SMALL BLOCK OF STOCK TO BE PAID 
FOR ON THE MOST LIBERAL PLAN EVER OFFERED ON 
A FIRST-CLASS STOCK. The money from the sale of this stock 
is to be used to drive the tunnel an extra one thousand feet in 1906. 
to further open up the enormous ore bodies which in the tunnel 
have already widened out to 42 feet, and is a solid ledge of quartz 
that shows better values and greater width with every foot obtained. 

The work is pushed as fast as men and giant powder can do it. 
The Company has the most complete hoisting plant of the Bullfrog 
camp and is piling ore on the dump every day that means dividends 
for years to come. j > ■ I 



Shaft No. 2, started early in November, is 100 feet deep, and 
it has been sunk in less time and at less expense than any shaft on 
the Original Mountain and possibly the entire camp. This shaft has 
already struck values assaying over $126 per ton, and it will strike 
the main ledge at about 120 feet in depth, which carries values of 
$300 to $2700 per ton, as shown by the ore taken from the shaft of 
the Bullfrog Fraction Claim that joins the end line next to Shaft 
No. 2,* only 40 feet away, and the Original Bullfrog north side line 
is only 45 feet from Shaft No. 2. The ore bodies found in the Bull- 
frog Fraction and the Original Bullfrog shows that the big blanket 
ledge pitches to the north and passes directly under the property 
of the Bullfrog Extension. 

THE MINE IS PAID FOR AND HAS C( >.\U'LETE HOIST- 
ING PLANT SHAFT HOUSES, BLACKSMITH SHOP AND 
OFFICE BUILDING, ALL PAID FOR , AND THE WORK 
CONSTANTLY GOING FORWARD UNDER CAPABLE 
MINE MANAGEMENT UNDER THE ADVICE AND SUPER- 
VISION OF ON OF THE BEST KNOWN' MINING ENGIN- 
EERS OF NEVADA. 

The Directorate of mining and business men of known integ- 
rity and ability is especially strong. The President and Secretary 
are well known bankers of San Francisco. No shareholder need 
ever sav that mining is a gamble if he will buy shares in such a 
mine as' that of the BULLFROG EXTENSION, that owns a mine 
that insures payment of dividends for vears to come. Write or wire 
us for particulars. 



DEBENTURE SURETY CO. (Inc.) 

A10 Rialto Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



i8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Seven Wonders 

Grand SigHts every traveler should see are 

1. Grand Canyon of Arizona, on tKe Santa Fe. 

2. Yosemite Valley and HetcK HetcKy, on tKe Santa Fe. 

3. Petrified Forest of Arizona, on tKe Santa Fe. 
4'. Niagara Falls, New YorK. 

5. Mammoth Cave, KentucKy. 

6. Our National Gapitol City, WasKington. 

7. TKe Big' Trees of California, on tKe Santa Fe. 



You can see all of these on a round trip east. Reduced 
rates and liberal stopovers may be had on the Santa Fe 

AsK at 553 MarKet Street, San Francisco 



A R&jlro^d 

to the Edge 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



19 



ANNUAL PRODUCTION. 



The annual production of crude petroleum 
since 1870, when a record was first kept, and 
the value, according to selling prices at tide- 
water, are herewith presented: 



Year. 

870 . . . 

S71 ... 

87-' ... 

873 ... 

S74 ... 

J 75 ... 

87c ... 

877 ... 

87S . . . 

S70 ... 

880 ... 

881 ... 



Barrels. 

I 3.6oo| 

I S^ooj 

I 6.500I 

I 7,200| 

7.700 

I 8.400 

I 9,600] 

i2.75o| 

15.227 

i9,858| 

! 42,8991 

; 99,8621 

882 j 128,6361 

883 j 142,8571 

884 1 262,0001 

885 1 325,000] 

886 1 377,i45l 

887 1 678,572! 

888 ! 690,333! 



889 

890 

891 

892 

893 

894 

895 

896 

897 

898 

899 

900 

901 

902 

903 

904 

905 

*Approximate. 



303,220 
307,360 
323,600 

385,049 
470,179 
783,078 

1,245,339 

1,257.780 

1,911,569 

2,249,088 

2,677,875 

4,329,950 

8,754,500 

13,692,514 

23,602,000 

28,423,860 

35,671,000 



Value. 
$5,123 
7.370 

9,876 
10,920 
10,540 

12,090 

15-4 10 

18.140 

22,780 

29,672 

68,450 

130,678 

172,730 

207,540 

428,600 

613,920 

642,785 

1,357,144 

1,380,666 

368,048 

384,200 

401,264 

56i,333 

608,092 

1,064,521 

1,000,235 

1,180,793 

1,918,269 

2,376,420 

2,660,793 

4,152,928 

7,487,600 

10,269,385 

16,521,400 

19,896,702 

'26,000,000 



HALFMOON BAY. 



The Wisconsin Company started up work 
a few months ago and have since heen drill- 
ing- their well deeper, also perforating the 
casing and from time to time have put the 
well on the pump to exhaust the water 
which is mixed with the oil. Operations 
are being carried on at the present time. 

The American Duchess Oil Company 
now has two producing wells with tanks 
filled with oil. The wells have been pump- 
ed only occasionally within the past several 
months, just enough to keep them in good 
working order. The company has recently 
hauled in several hundred cords of wood 
to be used as fuel in carrying on further 
operations. They expect to have a refinery 
at the property early in the spring which 
will afford a ready market at the wells for 
all the oil produced at the price of $2 per 
barrel. 

The company is exceptionally well equip- 
ped with all tools and machinery necessary 
for carrying on further operations ; several 



GASOLINE 

BENZINE 

KEROSENE 

NEUTRAL OILS 

LUBRICATING OILS 

CYLINDER OILS 

CASTOR MACHINE OILS 

DISTILLATES 

TERRENE TURPENTINE 

TERRENE LINSEED OIL 

ASPHALT 

AXLE GREASE 

COKE 



Cbabub Edward Earns, Pros Chas tmoi Ban Vice-Prea 

8. G Mm 11:, Superintendent Chablbb \. Bbown, Secretary 

Bulls Head Oil Works 

Manufacturers of 

High Grade Refined Products 

FROM 

California Crude Oil 

Awarded Gold Medal lewis & Clark's Exposition 



WORKS AT 

Bulls Head Point 
MARTINEZ 



CITV OFFICE 

227 &. 229 California St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DI VIDEN DS 

A few shares of stock for sale in one of the strongest corporations of this State. 
The company pays monthly dividends at the rate of 60 per cent per annum on par. 
We believe these dividends will be doubled, possibly trebled, within the next year. 
Full information on application to 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A-IO, RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, + * CALIFORNIA 

Sunset Oil makes the Best Roads 

WE HAVE THE OIL 

Natural Liquid Asphalt 
You must have it if you want good roads 



We can supply you with any quantity you may need and guarantee 
that every carload shipped will be as represented. 

Let us hear fnm you. Prompt attention to all letters of Inquiry, 



Adeline Oil Company 

1503 Nineteenth Street 



Bakersfield, 



California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



thousand feet of casing on hand, very com- 
plete machine shop, teaming and camp out- 
fit. 

It is reported that the Independent Oil 
Company will not do any more drilling un- 
til some time in April or May of this year, 
at which time work will be resumed. They 
have one well producing 55 gravity oil 
which is a paying proposition. 

The Paxton Halfmoon Bay Oil Company 
is not doing any work at present owing to 
the lack of funds to carry on operations. 
The parties interested in this company be- 
lieve that they will, in the course of a few 
months, raise the necessary cash to com- 
plete their well, which is already 1600 feet 
deep. 

The railroad building near these proper- 
ties is a great advantage to the oil field's as 
it will afford easy transportation, which is 
much needed for this field. 



PACIFIC OIL EXPORTS. 

Following are the exports of mineral oils 
from the Pacific ports of the United States, 
and shipments to Hawaii and Alaska for 
the twelve months ended November 1st 
last: 

Exports. 
Customs District. Gallons. 

Mineral Crude — 

Puget Sound 15 

San Diego 300 

San Francisco 2,060,624 

San Francisco 2,060,624 

Oregon, Ore 840,000 

Total 2,900,939 

Napthes, Etc.— 

Alaska 15,014 

Puget Sound 1 1,606 

San Diego 1 1,045 

San Francisco 64,391 

Total 102,056 

Illuminating — 

Alaska 76,04° 

Puget Sound 23,060 

San Diego 10,027 

San Francisco 11,634,702 

Total 11,743,829 

Lubricating — 

Alaska 10,537 

For Sale.— Complete Standard Oil Well 
Boring Outfit. Down to 2500 feet in very 
good condition. Apply, W. Plageman, Men- 
docino Oil Co., Yolo Miils, Northeast cor. 
Mission and Main streets. 

The Debenture Surety Company has de- 
clared and will pay its regular monthly div- 
idend (No. 29) of 5 cents per share on the 
31st day of December. It has also declared 
an extra Holiday dividend of 5 cents per 
share, both payable at the office of the com- 
pany, Rialto Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets. 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARLESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARLBSWORTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, II A II Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, wF fkl K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I \X U PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 



<^®@^ 





AIWMTI 

J 




T«8^& ^X^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



21 



Puget Sound 

San I )iegO i ,105 

San Francisco T.v-5r 

Williamctte 105 

Total 283,092 

Residuum — 

Alaska 4S 

Puget Sound /"" lo 5 

Total 7ii53 

Total Exports — 

Mineral Crude 2,900,939 

Naphthas, etc 102,056 

Illuminating n.743,829 

Lubricating 283,092 

Residuum — . 1 5 ^ 

Total 15,037,269 

Shipments to Alaska. 
Mineral Crude — 

From Puget Sound 1 1,060 

From San Francisco 2,704.326 

Total 2,715,386 

Naphthas, Etc. — 

From Puget Sound I 95>596 

From ( )regon, ( )re 2,100 

From San Francisco 504,86)6 

Total 702,562 

Illuminating — 

From Puget Sound 306,410 

From Willamette 2,420 

From Oregon, Ore 8,460 

From San Francisco 305,744 

Total 623,034 

Lubricating — 

From Puget Sound 49.798 

From Willamette 120 

From Oregon. ( )re 10 

From San Francisco 28,241 

Total 78,169 

Total Shipments to Alaska — 

Mineral Crude 2,715,386 

Naphthas, etc 702.562 

Illuminating 623,034 

Lubricating 78,169 

Total 4,1 19,151 

Shipments to Hawaii. 
Mineral Crude — 

From Los Angeles 1 ,772,250 

From San Francisco 26,070,530 

Total 27,842,780 

Naphthas, Etc. — 

From San Francisco 250.275 

Illuminating — 

From San Francisco 645,322 

Lubricating — 

From San Francisco 1 38,977 

Total Shipments to Hawaii — 

Mineral Crude 27,842,780 

Naphthas, etc 259,275 

Illuminating . '. 645.322 

Lubricating 138,977 

Total 28.886.354 

Grand Total. 

Total Exports 15.037,269 

Total Shipments to Alaska 4,119,151 

Total Shipments to Hawaii 28,886,354 

Total Gallons 48,042,774 

Total Parrels 1 ,143.876 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of ToddHolm Co., Aatayeri and Chemlits) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



MAPS 



The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to 810.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



318 Pine Street 



San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stand'ng price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will sion be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be follow ^ h" a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
itrcet, San Francisco. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, January 3d : 



Associated — 

1200 shares at '....$ 55 

Forty — 

1000 shares at 

Four — 

500 shares at 

Home — 

200 shares at ■ 

Monarch — 

1000 shares at 

Monte Cristo — 

500 shares at 

Oil City Petroleum — 

1500 shares at 

Union .Oil Co. — 

10 shares at 165 

West Shore — 

100 shares at 1 



00 

48 
35 
45 
14 
So 

75 
00 

So 



Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 



Bid. 

Alma 25 

Arline 30 

Apollo 05 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer 55 

California Standard 40 

Caribou 6.75 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude (New). .08 

Claremont 1 . 10 

Forty 48 

Four 30 

Giant .50 

Hanford 260.00 

Home 45 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 14 

Junction 

Kaweah 40 

Kern 13-50 

Kern (New) 09 

Kern River 

12 



Asked. 
.50 

■38 
.08 

•56 

.42 

7.25 



1 . 12% 
•50 
.35 



.09 

.13 

•75 
.03 



Linda Vista 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona . . 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va. . 

Oil City Petroleum 71 

Peerless 6.75 

Radium 15 

Piedomnt 06 

Radium 10 

Reed Crude 26 

Senator 1 .60 

Shawmut .' 

Sovereign 19 

Sterling 1.25 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5-00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7.00 

Union 162.00 

West Shore 1.50 

Wolverine ' 



.48 

.20 

16.00 

•'/ 
.20 



. 12 
10.00 

. 11 
.15 
.80 
.05 

■73 
9.00 

.07 
.20 
.28 



.40 

.25 

"!06 
6-75 

7-75 

168.00 

1.65 

1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code** 

318 PineSt, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1652 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil increased and 
gas saved 

A, S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants Tor Drilling 

Prices Reasonable ■ 

BOX 237 -. 




WANTED 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

I Fishing Tools 



W. E. YOULE 



SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago. Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 



Private looms 



Ptione Main 5966 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Jules Wlttmann 



23 



Jules' Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays $1.00. 



S15-3I7-3H-32I-32J 
Pile St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



• ••Will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 



FIRST=CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



Coalinga 



California 




WHEELER & WILSON MTG. CO. 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 

Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 

17 
Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSli CO. 
ONION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 




110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 



Paul W. Prutzman 

118 New Montgomery St, 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT& LUBRICATING OILS 




The accuracy and reliability of STEVENS Rifles 
and Shotguns have won for them an enviable repu- 
tation the world over. Our i-jo-pagc 

BOOK ON FIREARMS, FREE. 

It contains a full description of STEVENS Arms, 
also valuable information on hunting-, tl<e proper 
careof firearms, notes on sights, ammunition, etc. 
You should have it. Send two 2-cent stamps to 
cover postage. 

4 Stevens=naynard. Jr.,*' . $3.00 

*' Crack Shot," 4. 00 

*' Stevens Little Krag," . . 5.00 
" Favorite, No. 17," . . . 6.00 

CLEVER RIFLE PUZZLE sent FREE, postpaid 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 
P.O.Box 4093. 

CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS., U. S. A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Heme office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for the pro 
motion ol any legitimate piot-os.1 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. Irrl 
gation, Mercantile, Ptttit? c: 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 



TO 



THE 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Tei. Mint 2791 San Francisco 

A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisct 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

Wc carry the L,*rge« stock. Oar price, are 
Bq nibble. 

»el. Main. 1183. 



PATENTS 



"United States and 
Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
la usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 
of machine for oil and gas works. It ., _ , ,. .. .. , _.__ - . . . .. . . 

mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests range from snal,ow water wells to a lim,t of 2825 feet ,n de P th ' but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made In Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Pishing Tools, Reamers. Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Harron. Rickard & McCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




24 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



" ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



TH 



-MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



R 



FINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 



MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE _______: CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



"When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 



Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magazine describes 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel, 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCALE EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 



Phone James 7116 



315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal- 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 




Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases Salts; Clay 



Tank Caps and Oil Ships sampled 
aid inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




-y - TA T -e 



Tn , s Paper not 
to betAW" 1 I,u,n 




Vol. 7, No. 11. 



San Francisco, Cal., January 13, 1906. 



Price lO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 




WE ARC AGENTS FOR 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
•AN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



W0I&0J0M! 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean* 
ing out, pumping, pulb 

M&M&&& .©M©':©M©1 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 



WILLIAM M 



Pacific Coast Agent 



GRAHAM 

- Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 13, 1900 



Number 11 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' Ass'n. 

Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. . . 

OFFICE AND EDITORIAL ROOMS 

318 Pine Street - - San Francisco, California 
Telephone, Bush 176. 

TERMS. 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 -50 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

8TRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, Draft 
or registered Letter, addressed to Pacific Oil 
Reporter, 3 1 8 Pine Street, San Francisco, rooms 
31-32-33. Communications must be accompanied 
by writer's name and address, not necessarily for 
publication, but as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, Cal- 
ifornia, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for Califor- 
nia crude oil at the wells as offered by the recog- 
nized buyers: 

coalinga. 

Price per barrel. 
22 deg. up to, but not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 deg. .22^ 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

KERN RIVER. 

14° gravity or better 18c 

SANTA MARIA. 

24 deg., up to but not including 25 20 

25 deg., or better - 22y 2 

EASTERN QUOTATIONS. 

Tiona $1-68 

Pennsylvania 1-58 

Second Sand 1-38 

Corning 1-10 

Newcastle 1-35 

Cabell 1-18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1-34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30y 2 gravity 40 

30V 2 to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 31V' gravity 46 

3ly 2 to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 

TEXAS 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy 32 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 



One might readily believe from the tart 
replies of H. II. Rogers to the questions 
piled upon him by Herbert S. Hadley. Attor- 
ney General of Missouri, that he (Rogers) 
is very much unconcerned as to the outcome 
of the inquiry as to who owns the controll- 
ing interest in the Waters, Pierce and Re- 
public oil companies, operating in the same 
Stale. Yet the evasiveness of reply and the 
objections of counsel all go to establish the 
fact that there is a "skeleton in the closet" 
which is sure to be brought out into the 
limelight of publicity to the humiliation of 
those who have been hiding it. Rogers' ap- 
parent disregard and disrespect of law and 
order does not raise him in the estimation 
of the general public and is likely to lead 
him into serious difficulties. Possibly he 
may believe it cheaper to pay a fine for con- 
tempt of court than to divulge the secrets of 
Standard Oil, but such a course will hardly 
help him out in this instance, for such a man 
as Hadley is not likely to let the matter rest 
until he has accomplished the task he has 
taken upon himself. If the Standard Oil 
Company was conducting its business hon- 
estly it would have little reason for refusing 
to divulge its business connections and H. 
H. Rogers is giving the very best proof of 
its dishonesty we have ever seen. While 
keeping well away from a possible prosecu- 
tion for perjury by his present tactics it is 
by no means certain that he will keep out- 
side the prison walls. The outcome of the 
investigation will be watched with interest. 
It may serve as an object lesson for similar 
prosecutions in California. 



The term "magnetic wells" has been ap- 
plied to wells whose casings attract and 
hold iron objects. In the study of under- 
ground waters much interesting information 
concerning these magnetic wells has been 
obtained by members of the United States 
Geological Survey. A report is now in 
preparation in which some of the magnetic 
features of these wells are described and the 
causes of these phenomena discussed, and 
the officers of the Survey would be pleased 
to receive additional data on the subject 
from drillers, well owners, and others who 
have knowledge of wells of this character. 
Usually only small objects, such as nails. 



arc attracted by the casings, but occasion- 
ally a well is found in which the magnetism 
is sufficient to hold hammers or wrenches. 
Information is especially desired concerning 
the sizes of objects attracted by the cas- 
ings, the method used in sinking the well, 
the nature of the materials penetrated, and 
the length of the casing. 

The water in the wells is sometimes re- 
ported to be magnetic. Although it is be- 
lieved that this report will not be verified, 
it is suggested that tests of the water should 
be made wherever possible. To make a test 
for magnetism in water, a glass vessel (a 
metal vessel will not answer) should be 
filled at the well and carried to a distance 
of about ioo paces from the well, where it 
should be at least equally remote from any 
mass of iron. A piece of steel, such as a 
pocket knife, should then be carefully tested 
with some common needles for magnetism. 
If the steel is not magnetised it should then 
be placed immediately in the water in the 
glass vessel and allowed to remain there for 
five minutes, after which it should be wiped 
dry and again tested. 

Any information furnished the Survey in 
the investigation of these wells will be ap- 
preciated. 



It is reported from Washington that Se- 
cretary Taft has recommended to the Presi- 
dent that he sanction the issuance of a re- 
vocable license to the Union Oil Company 
of California to construct and maintain a 
pipe line across the canal zone. There are 
six applicants for such a right, but the com- 
pany named is the only one which specified 
the price of oil if used by the Government 
and whose offer was otherwise sufficiently 
definite and reasonable. 

The company undertakes to pay $500 per 
month, to be applied to school purposes in 
the canal zone, and also to permit the Gov- 
ernment to draw upon its pipe line at any 
point for oil at 90 cents a barrel. Secretary 
Taft in his letter to the President, explains 
that this is about equivalent for fuel pur- 
poses to Pocahontas coal at the present cost 
on the isthmus of S4 per ton, so that tl 
may be used for all purposes if desired in 
the construction of the canal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Mews from the Fied 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



THE SANTA MARIA FIELD NOTES. 



Since my last local news report very 
much interest has been centered on Port 
Harford. In fact ever since the increased 
shipping of oil from this field, pipe-lined 
to Port Harford, interest has centered by 
both the Pacific Coast Oil Co. and the Union 
Oil Co. on port facilities. 

The large increased shipping has aroused 
the interest of both San Luis Obispo and 
the Santa Maria Chamber of Commerce to 
urge on their representatives in Congress to 
make Port Harford a free port of entry. In 
fact we find that United States Senator Per- 
kin and Representative S. C. Smith of the 
Eighth Congressional District have already 
introduced a bill into their respective 
houses to make Port Harford a sub-port of 
entry. To realize the interest and import- 
ance of this matter to the oil industry we 
copy verbatum 'The Resolutions" passed 
by the Santa Maria Chamber of Commerce 
at its last session : 

Whereas, It appears that Port Harford is 
not a port of entry ; that vessels loaded with 
oil for foreign ports must go to San Fran- 
cisco to clear, a round trip of over four hun- 
dreds miles for vessels bound for all ports 
south and east of this port, and 

Whereas, This will entail loss of time and 
great inconvenience to our oil producers 
and still more so to the shippers of one of 
the largest oil fields in the State and natura- 
ally tributary to Port Harford, and 

Whereas, The Santa Maria oil fields are 
producing both fuel and distillable oils from 
wells of enormous capacity, whose success- 
ful output depends on shipping facilities, 
and whose development has hardly begun, 
therefore be it 

Resolved. That this Chamber of Com- 
merce, representing the northern part of 
Santa Barbara county, ask the Representa- 
tives in Congress of the whole State of Cal- 
ifornia, and especially of this district, to 
secure during the present session the pas- 
sage of a bill making Port Harford by ex- 



tending the breakwater, the work on which 
we ask may be continued uninterruptedly 
until completed. 

The secretary is requested to send a copy 
of this resolution to all of the California 
representatives in Congress with the last 
annual report of the Santa Maria Oil fiields 
issued by this Chamber of Commerce. 
Notes From the Field. 

The Union Oil Company has about finish- 
ed their large warehouse at Orcutt, an ex- 
tensive one at that. More dwellings are go- 
ing up in that oil town, showing the feeling 
of confidence in the development of these 
oil fields. Fox No. 3 derrick and outhouses 
on the Union Company's property was 
burnt down a week ago, but the fire did not 
spread any further. The Union has met 
with but few mishaps considering the vast- 
ness of their field and the extent of their in- 
terest. 

In the annual review the writer divided 
the Santa Maria fields into the central field, 
the Los Alamos anticline, the eastern and 
western fields. The central one and the Los 
Alamos anticline are the only ones as yet 
producing oil but development work con- 
tinues in both the western and eastern fields 
and before another six months rolls by a 
good deal will be known about these two 
outskirting fields. 

In the eastern field, on the Palmer Oil 
Co.'s land, Mr. E. Henderson, reports strik- 
ing shale at about 1000 feet, after having had 
many difficulties in penetrating the previous 
sticky formation. He has just shut off the 
water {following down from above) and ex- 
pects rapid progress from now on. 

The several wells on the different fields in 
the westerly fields (are finding deep terri- 
tory to drill in, but the ground is firm and 
easy to drill in. except in one single lease 
where tar oil was encountered. We shall 
specialize on them some other time. 

The Rice Ranch Co. have levied an as- 
sessment for paying up their property which 
was promptly paid. This company and the 
Pennsylvania are close together and their 
wells are liable to come in at any time. 

The Los Alamos Oil Co. is getting ready 
to bore another well. This is the very deep- 
est territory, over 4000 feet. But oil is very 
fi n e (35 grav.) and flows out. 

L. E. B. 



The Bullfrog Extension Mining Com- 
pany's annual stockholders' meeting . was 
held at the office of the company, 324 Rialto 
Building, San Francisco, Cal., on January 
9th, 1906, and 642,252 shares were repre- 
sented in person or by proxy. The follow- 
ing Board of Directors was elected for the 
ensuing year : G. W. Lewis, L. E. Foster, 
J. E. Kerr, W. W. Nellis, J. D. Brown, T. 
C. T ridel- and M. Tridel. The entire Board 
of Directors was re-elected with one excep- 
tion, the stockholders electing in his stead 
J. E. Kerr as director and general manager ; 
G. W. Lewis, president, and L. E. Foster, 
secretary. 

The general manager's report shows the 
company in splendid physical and financial 
condition, there being two shafts sunk on 
the property to a depth of about 100 feet 
each, at which point the ledge was cut and 
drifting was done, cutting a ledge 30 to 40 
feet wide, running from milling values up to 
$126 per ton. When the incline tunnel 
reached a depth of 160 feet an upraise of 85 
feet was made to the surface for air which 
showed a quartz ledge in place of more than 
42 feet in width. The tunnel has now reach- 
ed a depth -of more tahn 180 feet and values 
are showing up better as depth is attained. 

At the tunnel the company has installed 
a very complete 25-horse power gasoline 
hoist which is working satisfactorily and the 
company is, making on, an average 15 feet 
per week with each shift, while work at the 
shaft is going forward with a double shift 
of men. The work done in shaft No. 2 is 
at the west end of the property, shaft No. 
1 is in the center and the tunnel is well to 
the east and in all of these three workings 
an enormous blanket ledge has been opened 
up, which shows this ledge to be 1500 feet 
long. 

The stockholders expressed themselves as 
being very much pleased with the handling 
of their property and are sanguine that they 
have one of the great properties of Nevada. 

Oil has been struck at Carnegie, thirty 
miles south of Stockton, on the Corral Hol- 
low Railroad, which was recently taken 
over by the Western Pacific. 

The California Petroleum Refineries, Ltd., 
will construct a large refinery near San 
Francisco. The company has capital of 
$1,000,000, and has secured a ten-year's con- 
tract for the delivery yearly of 1,500,000 to 
3,000,000 barrels of crude oil. The refinery 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



will b >ii tin- baj near to San Fran- 

Monte Cristo Oil Co. has declared a div- 
idend of one cent per share on its capitaliza- 
tion. 

Imperial Oil Co. lias declared a dividend 
of twenty cents per share. 

Thirty-Three Oil Co. has declared a divi- 
dend of ten cents per share on its capitaliza- 
tion. 

The Standard ( >il Co. is again using its 
Bakersfield-Point Richmond pipe line in a 
small way. probably for expreimental pur- 
poses as the riorth end of it is used almost 
to it- capacity for the transportation of 
I oalinga oil. 

The Claremont Oil Co. paid a monthly 
dividend of one cent per share on January 
2. 

The dividends paid in December on oil 



been brought in, but information a- to the 
quantity is not obtainable. In the extreme 

eastern part of Chihuahua, near Ojinaga, 

and along the survey line of Kansas City, 
Mexico and Orient railway, a companj 

headed by Mr. \V. R. Hearst, the journalist, 
and Mr. James R. Keene. the Wall Street 
operator, have a steam drilling outfit pros- 
pecting' for oil on a tract of 1(15.000 acres, 
which they have obtained in that section. 



Inauguration of the Pipe 
Line 



The first successful pipe line was con- 
structed by Mr. Daniel Van Syckle, of Tit- 
usville, Pa., in the summer of 1865, extend- 
ing from Pithole to the railway on Oil Creek 
at Miller farm, a distance of between four 
and five miles. In the fall of the same year 
another line was constructed by Mr. Henry 
Harley, from Benninghoff Run to the 



Irunk line was constructed from Hillianl 
Station in Northern Butler, Pa. 

land, ( >hio, a distance of 103 miles. The 

diameter of this line was five inches. 

During [879 shorter lines were laid from 
the Bradford field to the Erie Railroad at 

CarroIIton and ( llean, X. Y., near the north- 
ern border of Pennsylvania, and to Kane, on 
the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad. 

In the winter of 1879 and 1880 the first 
trunk line to the seaboard was begun. The 
one in Pennsylvania was six inches in di- 
ameter, started at Colegrove, McKean 
County, and extended to Philadelphia, a 
distance of 235 miles, with a branch five in- 
ches in diameter which left the main line at 
Midway and extended to Baltimore, a dis- 
tance of 66 miles. 

The other seaboard lines started at Olean, 
N.«Y., and were double six-inch lines run- 



EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MINERAL OIL FROM THE PACIFIC PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES, AND THE SHIPMENTS TO ALASKA 

AND HAWAII DURING NOVEMBER, 1905. 



CUSTOMS DISTRICTS. 

Domestic Exports from — 

Alaska 

Puget Sound 

San Diego no 

San Francisco 421.100 



Mineral, Crude. Naphthas, Etc. Illuminating. 

Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. Gallons. Dollars. 

I,O0O 250 7,430 1,546 

45 5.073 776 

14 220 14 900 174 



Lubricating. Residuum. 

Gallons. Dollars. Barrels. Dollars. 



250 
220 

8,044 4.660 



581 3,666,219 132,930 



4,82 1 526 

493 !« 2 

42,920 12,890 



3.35° 



235 



Total domestic 421,210 

Shipments to Hawaii. 

From San Francisco 1 ,687,560 

From Willamette 84,000 

Shipments to Alaska. 

From Puget Sound 

From San Francisco 



8,058 6,130 8903,679,622 135,426 

56,100 44,150 5.481 121,550 21,181 
28,000 



48,234 13,578 
24,480 7,939 



3.358 235 



6.430 



24.937 
500 



5.575 
88 



6,705 2,867 



Reported expressly for Pacific Oil Reporter by Department of Commerce and Labor, Bureau of Statistics. 



stocks and Oil Exchange amounted to $119,- 
081, making a grand total of $8,282,661 to 
date. 

That the Texas field extends through the 
gulf states of Mexico seems to be borne out 
by the facts that wells have been drilled in 
Tamaulipas, Vera Cruz, and Tabasco. The 
most successful work . has been done at 
Ebano, Tamaulipas, where the Mexican Pe- 
troleum Company, headed by California oil 
men, have brought in some ten wells which 
are heavy producers and have proved that 
petroleum exists in large qauntities. In the 
state of Vera Cruz the Mexico Company has 
brought in some wells. The same has been 
clone in the state of Tabasco near the Te- 
hauntepec railway, by Messrs. Pearson & 
Sons, the great English contracting firm. 
It is understood that this firm is drilling to 
prove these fields. Some wells have alreadv 



Shaffer farm. Afterwards both of these 
lines were united under the title of the Al- 
legheny Transportation Company. These 
lines were successful, much to the discom- 
fiture of the teamsters, who in some in- 
stances pulled the lines in two with their 
teams. These and other difficulties were 
soo novercome, and the pipe line became an 
important factor in the collection and trans- 
portation of petroleum to points of ship- 
ment by rail or water. There was an im- 
provement in the shipment by rail by the 
introduction of the iron tank cars, and by 
the improvement in the method of loading 
them. The first trunk pipe line was con- 
structed in 1875, was 39 miles long, and was 
of 4-inch pipe. It started five miles east of 
Butler and terminated at Brilliant Station, 
on the Allegheny River, a fe wmiles above 
Pittsburg. In the summer of 1879 the 



ning parallel through the southern counties 
of that state to Saddle River, N. J., and 
passing under the East and North rivers to 
the refineries at Hunter's Point on Long Is- 
land. The distance between the points 
named is 313 miles, the entire length of pipe 
laid being 762 miles, on account of loops. 
The terminus at Olean was shortly there- 
after connected by pipe line with Bear 
Creek on the Allegheny River, near Parker, 
Pa., making a continuous line of 420 miles to 
Bayonne, N. J. 

There are now less than 5,500 trunk pipe 
lines in use, connected by a network of 
smaller lines in the producing regions, that 
would bring up the total to more than 50,- 
000 miles. The construction and operation 
of trunk lines has been actively pushed in 
California. Kansas. Texas, and Louisiana 
during 1904. 

The transportation annually of 15,00. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tons of petroleum an average distance of 350 
miles by pipe lines, with only insignificant 
loss by leakage, evaporation, or fire, repre- 
sents a triumph of the highest engineering 
and mechanical skill. The introduction of 
the pipe line system brought about the re- 
moval of the refining branch of the petrol- 
eum industry to the centers of manufacture 
in the lake and seaboard cities where at 
least 80 per cent of the crude product is now 
converted into illuminating and other oils 
and by-products. 

Coal Report for 19 05 



J. W. Harrison, coal and metal broker, 
has compiled the following interesting coal 
report for 1905 : 

The consumption of coal for this year is 
219,182 tons less than last year, as can be 
ascertained by referring to the figures be- 
low. This shrinkage must not be taken as 
an indication that our fuel requirements 
have been at all less than in 1904. The ap- 
parent diminished quantity of coal fuel has 
been much more than made good, by an out- 
put this year of fully three million barrels 
• of fuel oil in excess of last year. The quan- 
tity of coal shipped here from British Co- 
lumbia, is in excess of last year shipments, 
whereas the Australian amount has shrunk 
fully 40 per cent. A new feature has recent- 
ly developed itself in Colonial deliveries be- 
ing made here by steamers, there are several 
already chartered, which have yet to arrive, 
with freight at about 16 shillings per ton, 
and with the duty of 67 cents per ton, the 
importers receive a very small compensa- 
tion for the coal; less than one-half the 
amount demanded for British Columbia coal 
at port of shipment. 

The quotations of coal of all grades have 
ruled very uniformly throughout the year, 
the prices of steam grades have favored the 
buyers, having fuel oil for a close competi- 
tor. This has not been an advantageous 
port for coal carriers to come to, on arrival 
here they find no profitable outward busi- 
ness, either for lumber or cereals. We are 
promised a reduction of about 25 per cent in 
the price of gas at an early date, this will 
necessarily lead to an increased demand for 
gas stoves for cooking and heating purposes, 
and will naturally diminish the coal con- 
sumption for the same purposes. The la- 
bor disturbances in British Columbia which 
lasted for about six months this year, ser- 



ved to diminish the importations from the 
Nanaimo section, and helped to increase the 
Colonial importations, both as to quantity 
and price. Favorable terms were reached in 
November last, and work has been re- 
commenced, and is now running harmon- 
iously. About 80 per cent of the coal trade 
is under the control and supervision of one 
firm locally. This is found to work with ad- 
vantage to the buyers and the sellers, as the . 
material can be handled so much more econ- 
omically, and prices are sustained more uni- 
formly. There are six steamers now being 
utilized by this firm, transporting coal from 
British Columbia only ; the last deliveries 
here of the six steamers amounted to over 
24,000 tons, partially for steam purposes, 
and partially domestic grades. 

The various sources from which we have 
derived our coal supplies are as follows : 



Russian Petroleum Losses 







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c 

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To secure a complete statement of the en- 
tire coal consumption of California, I have 
been obliged to include deliveries at Port 
Los Angeles and San Diego by water, which 
have been added to the above sources of 
supply. The total amount received by water 
at those ports foot up 38,197 tons. 



The naphtha producers and manufac- 
tures at Baku (considering the report on the 
damage inflicted on the petroleum industries 
during the late riots, a report which was 
prepared by the commission appointed by 
the Russian Minister for Finance, underes- 
timated the losses) appointed a committee 
of their own to study the question. The re- 
port has just been published. While prac- 
tically agreeing with the government report 
as to the material and working value of the 
•plants destroyed above ground, the manu- 
facturers' committee set the amount of 
money required to restore Baku to its for- 
mer condition at 40,000,000 roubles, just a 
triffle more than twice the figure at which 
the government assessed the total loss. 

Both reports may be summarized as fol- 
lows: 
Percentage of derricks destroyed : 

Government report 60 

Naptha Industries' report 58^ 

Average output of destroyed derricks : 
Government report (poods 

per month) 27,200,000 

Naphtha Industries report 

(poods per diem) 820,920 

Money loss incurred by destruction of plant 
and naphtha : 

Government report (rou- 
bles) 19,776,000 

Naptha Industries' report 

(roubles) 28,700,000 

Appreciation of material required to rein- 
state plant: 

Naphtha Industries report 

(roubles) 13,300,000 

The manufacturers' committee observes, 
in order to justify its own conclusion, that 
the government assessment of losses con- 
fines itself to those sustained above ground, 
whereas, in point of fact, considerable dam- 
age was done under the surface. The pipes 
of the wells were found in many cases to be 
stopped up by foreign bodies and half-burnt 
wreckage, which will delay the resumption 
of operations for some time. Some 7,000,- 
000 roubles must be added to cover loss 
from these causes. The committee main- 
tains also, that the government has assessed 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



the monej prices normally 

obtaining; whereas, in point of fact, the 
value of limber and iron, t<> -;i\ nothing "i 
mch appreciated in the Baku 
district on account of their general scarcity 
that 40 per cent at least must l)c added to 
the above assessment of loss; so thai |o,- 
00 roubles would more nearl) represent 
the damage done, as far as can be at present 
ascertained, than any lower figure. 

The prices for oil residues (mazoot) in 
Astrachan have moderated somewhat, being 
now about 36 kopecks bid, while a number 
of small consignments of petroleum have 
changed hands at 37V£kopecks. A large 
deal by the Caspian and Mantascheff Com- 
panies, through the medium of the Russian 
Bank, is reported, in which these companies 
sold 1.000,000 poods of mazoot to the Orient 
Company, one-half at a kopecks cash and 
the other half at 34 kopecks bills. The more 
prices come down, the smaller are the com- 
panies' chances of recouping- their losses. 



Taltal Railway to Burn Oil 



The expansion of the nitrate industry in 
Chili was the theme of the chairman's open- 
ing remarks at the Taltal Railway meeting 
in London. He remarked that three new 
oficinas were being erected during the 
course of the next year within the com- 
pany's sphere of operations, and the money 
had been provided for the construction of 
others. In order to cope with the fresh 
traffic a further creation of capital was fore- 
shadowed although the mode and time of 
the issue were not yet determined. In re- 
gard to the concession which has been 
granted to a rival company, the chairman 
said that as the result of the determined op- 
position of the Taltal Company it was not 
likely that the line would be constructed, at 
any rate, before the enpiration of their con- 
cession in 1912, when he hoped the railway 
would be in the position to ignore the new 
enterprise. The chairman referred to the 
possibility of the use of oil as fuel in the 
manufacture of nitrate as the result of the 
unlimited supply to be obtained from Cali- 
fornia. The board would consider the ad- 
visability if using it on the railway if satis- 
factory terms could be arranged. 



GASOLINE 

BENZINE 

KEROSENE 

NEUTRAL OILS 

LUBRICATING OILS 

CYLINDER OILS 

CASTOR MACHINE OILS 

DISTILLATES 

TERRENE TURPENTINE 

TERRENE LINSEED OIL 

ASPHALT 

AXLE GREASE 

COKE 



Ciui.iis EmvAiiu Kuiv. Pren. I \ ii 1 Preg 

s. ( ; Mn 1 1 11, Superintendent, Crahmb A. Bdown, Secretary 



Bulls Head Oil Works 

Manufacturers of 

High Grade Refined Products 

FROM 

California Crude Oil 

Awarded Gold Medal Lewis & Clark's Exposition 



Wl IBKS AT 

Bulls Head Point 
MARTINEZ 



CITY OFFICE 

227 &. 229 California St. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



DIVIDENDS 



A few shares of stock for sale in one of the strongest corporations of this State. 
The company pays monthly dividends at the rate of 60 per cent per annum on par. 
We believe these dividends will be doubled, possibly trebled, within the next year. 
Full information on application to 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A-IO, RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, * * CALIFORNIA 

Sunset Oil makes the Best Roads 

WE HAVE THE OIL 

Natural Liquid Asphalt 
You must have it if you want good roads 



We can supply you with any quantity you may need and guarantee 
hat every carload shipped will be as represented. 

Let us hear from you. Prompt attention to all letters of Inquiry, 

isjtb ®$9 ®$B 

Adeline Oil Company 

1503 Nineteenth Street 



Bakersfield, 



California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



EASTERN EXPORTS. 

Following are the exports of mineral oils 
from the Eastern ports of the United States 
for the month of November, 1905 : 

Crude- 
Delaware 6,499,914, 333,031 

Philadelphia 270,000 24.386 

Galveston 4,620 ' 220 

Total 6,774,534 357 637 

Naphthas — 
Boston and Charles-- 

town 246 30 

New York 719,720 94,069 

Philadelphia 965,011 63,229 

Total 1,684,977 I57-328 

Illuminating — 

Baltimore 3.867,675 309,414 

Boston and Charles- 
town 100,726 11,633 

New York 29,352,684 2,250,387 

Philadelphia 20,481,335 1,043,124 

Galveston 2,462,061 150,801 

Total . 56,264,481 3,765.359 

Lubricating and parffin : 

Baltimore 388,677 51,185 

Boston and Charles- 
town 5,519 1,027 

New York 6,970,744 932,293 

Philadelphia 2,589,905 286,030 

Galveston no 40 

Total 9,954,855 1,270,575 

Residuum — 

New York 900,500 26.940 

Philadelphia 6,684,830 192,947 

Galveston 200 15 

Total 7,585,530 219,902 

Total mineral oils — 

Baltimore 4,256,352 360,599 

Boston and Charles- 
town 106,491 12,690 

Delaware 6,499,914 333.03 1 

New York 37,943,648 3.303,689 

Philadelphia . ... 40,990,981 1,609,716 

Galveston 2,466,991 151,076 

Total .....82,264,377 5,770,8oi 

RECENT PATENTS. 

The following patents recently granted, 
of interest to the oil and gas trade, are re- 
ported expressly for the Pacific Oil Reporter 
by J. M. Nesbit, Patent Attorney, Park 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 




Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, CaJ, 



¥M. WAI,I,ACK B. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




P&B 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, 
Toilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 

COALINGA, CAL. 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 




CAR TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



FOR ALL. USES 



We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mount on wood or steel underframes. 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 
of all sizes up to and including 

SB. OOO BARRELS 



Oil Refineries Complete Oar Specialty 



WARREN CITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE AND W O B K S:— W A R B E N , OHIO 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Building, Pittsburg, Pa., from whom pi 

- ma) be procured for fifteen cents 
each : 

Puinping-jack, E. I\ Helm, Montpelier, 
Ind., 806,140. 

Walking-beam, I. K. Semple, Sugarcreek, 
Pa., 80643& 

Lifting apparatus for deep wells, F. J. 
Moser, Kane. Pa., 806,557. 

< >il well device, F. II. McCollough, Fair- 
view township, Butler County, Pa., 806,559. 

Pulling machine for nil wells, \\ . A. Wor- 
rell and Leslie Fish. Vanburen, Ind., 806,- 
7->4- 

Portable drilling machine, II. S. Glenn 
ami C. E. Glenn, Oakmont, Pa., 8061886. 

Pipe grip, D. W. Stirling, Glade Mills. 
Pa., 807,405. 

Automatic volumetric governor for gas- 
lines. S. E. Crawford. Avalon, Pa., 807,725. 

Well drilling apparatus. L. D. Shryock, 
Marietta. 1 Ihio, 807,784. . 

Underreamer, 1-'. ( '.. Irvine, Marietta. 
1 Ihio, 807,826. 

Rig for oil wells, I\ W. Pennell, Lima, 
I Hiio. 807,861. 

( ias engine, Robert Longtime and Ed- 
ward Double. Los Angeles, Cal., 807,950. 

Process of treating petroleum oils, T. P. 
Winter, Sourlake, Tex., 807,983. 

Ratchet swivel rope-socket, Edward 
Double, Los Angeles, Cal., 808,199. 

Automatic rotary hydraulic casing-spear, 
H. G. Johnston, Corsicane, Texas, 808,378. 

Drill feed, J. G. Winger, Grand Valley, 
Pa., 808,499. 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, Jan. 10th : 

Associated — 

1,321 shares at $ 55-00 

Arline — 

500 shares at .35 

California Standard — 

200 shares at .37 

Chicago Crude (New) — 

2,000 shares at .08 

Claremont — 

500 shares at 1 .00 

Forty— 

OO shares at 48 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 


MAPS 


(of Todd- Holm Co., Aswtyereaud ChemiftU) 


The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 


P. O. Box 227 


to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 


GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 


ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 


Will Examine and Report on Mines 


requirements. 


Can assist on purchase of Mines and Prospects 


PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 


References on application 


318 Pine Street San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stand'ng price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will sion be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be followed hv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
itreet, San Francisco. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Independence — 

1,000 shares at .18 

Monarch — 

1 ,000 shares at .14 

275 shares at .15 

Occidental — 

500 shares at .04 

Oil City Petroleum — 

1,000 shares at .72 

500 shares at .Jt, 

Sterling — 

100 shares at 1 .50 

Union Oil Co. of California — 

20 shares at 165.00 

West Shore — 

500 shares at 1 .00 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 



09 
50 
09 



Bid. 

Alma 25 

Arline 30 

Apollo 05 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . . .55 

California-Standard 

Caribou 6.50 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude (New). .08 

Claremont 1 . 10 

Forty 45 

Four 30 

Giant 50 

Hanford 260.00 

Home 40 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 16 

Junction 

Kern (New) 

Kern 13 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 12 

McKittrick 09 

Monarch of Arizona 14 

Monte Crista yjy 2 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum 70 

Peerless 6.75 

Radium 15 

Piedomnt 06 

Radium 10 

Reed Crude 26 

Senator 1 .60 

Shawmut 

Sovereign 21 

Sterling 1 .30 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5-00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7.00 

Union 162 . 00 

West Shore 1.40 

Wolverine Z * 



Asked. 
.50 
■38 
.08 
•56 
.42 

7-25 



1 . 121/0 

• 49 
.35 



.20 

14.00 
.18 
.20 
.20 

.12 
10.00 



•15 
•85 
.04 

•74 
9.00 

.07 
.20 
.28 

.40 
.29 

1.60 
.06 

6-75 

8.00 
55.00 

1 .60 
1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

AH "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, BtC, STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code*' 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Mala I65S 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable ti 

BOX ™ 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULE 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago, Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

F U l_ l_ Y PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



1! 



Private loom Phone Main 5966 Jules Wlttmann 

Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317-319-321-323 

Piae St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 




New Rl£ S of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MT'B. CO. 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coallnga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



>7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattxb 



Paul W. Prutzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
PAT & LUBRICATING OILS 




Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

arc perfect in every respect. The sportsman is never 
disappointed in the working of his gun if it's a STEV- 
ENS — they are safe, strong, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

We will send vmi our valuable 140-page book, tell- 
ing all about STEVENS arms, shooting, hunting, 
notes on the proper care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FREE FVZ2L£! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
yon cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, en receipt of catalog price. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 

I' B0X4093. 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS.. U.S.A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital is desired for thr pr<r 
motion ot any legitimate ptoposl 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Pataits or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporatkd un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Tel. Mint 279' San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry Ihe i..rge,i stock. Oar price, are 
Bqult.ble. 

Tel. Main. 1188. 

PATENT S — Unlted States and 

*■__——>— Foreign. Trade 
Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



Park Building, 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 

of machine for oil and gas works. It , , 

mounted upon trucks separate. Its tests ran 9 e from "hallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 

1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 
Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Harron, Rickard & McCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



' ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



MALTHA 



THE 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZ= CHICAGO OFFICE 



WHITEHALL BLDG. ,17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



"When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 

No other magazine describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
It is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 

Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
I\QSCAI.F EU CAI-YPTUS BOILER COMPOUND . 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 



Phone James 7116 



315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 




Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases Salts; Clay 







Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SA1V FRANCISCO 




Vol. 7, Np. 12. San Francisco, Cal., January 20, 1906. Price lO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



>-, 



.-,: r ,-, 







■ 



WE ABB AGENTS FOB .. 

LE8 CHEN LI N E 8 ... R . H. HBRRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
•AN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELBS, CAL. 



R E 



REID GAS ENGINE CO 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

ID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, cleans- 
ing out, pumping, pulU 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jlpply to 



WILLIAM 

Pacific Coast Agent 



GRAHA 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 20, 1906 



Number 12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed bj California Petroleum Miners' 
Association. 

Maria R. Winn. Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 

Office and Editorial Rooms 
318 Pine Street San Francisco, California 
Telephone Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 . 50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
Advertising Rates on Request. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, 
Draft, or Registered Letter, addressed to 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San 
Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Communications 
must be accompanied by writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postorfice at San Francisco, 
California, as second-class matter. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
California crude oil at the wells as offered 
by the recognized buyers: 

Coalinga. 

22 deg. up to, not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to. not including 25 deg .22 1 /> 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

Higher prices paid to favored companies 

on long time contracts. 

Kern River. 

Xo established quotation, price subject to 
contract with marketers. 

Santa Maria. 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25. . .20 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 22V2 

Higher prices paid on long time contracts. 

Eastern Quotations. 

Tiona $1.68 

Pennsylvania 1 . 58 

Second Sand 1 . 58 

Corning 1 . 10 

Newcastle 1 .35 

Cabell 1. 18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1 . 34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30V0 gravity 40 

301 L . to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 31% gravity 46 

31% to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 



Texas. 

1 [umble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, hca\ y 3J 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 4" 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 

An estimate of the petroleum production 
of 1905 from the fifteen slates and territories 
of the Union in which petroleum is found 
puts the year's total output at 130,000,000 
barrels. The states in the order of their 
importance were given in the 1904 report as 
follows : California, Ohio, Texas, West 
Virginia, Pennsylvania, Indiana, New York, 
Kansas, Louisiana Kentucky - Tennessee, 
Colorado, Indian Territory-Oklahoma, and 
Wyoming. Some changes in this alignment 
will be necessary in the 1905 report, owing 
to the increased production from Kansas and 
the Indian Territory and other shifting of 
the supply. But the production is substan- 
tially, as stated, from the fifteen states and 
territories named. 

In the opinion of an Eastern oil authority 
the immense volume of production of 1905 — 
a production which a few years ago would 
have been sufficient to bring the industry to 
stagnation — has not been the most remark- 
able feature of the year's business. The 
most suggestive feature is represented in the 
fact that the principal competition for the 
year has related more to the obtaining of 
crude supplies than to the marketing 
branches of the business. This competition 
has been much more than local— it has been 
international. While the dominant oil in- 
terests in this country have been reaching 
out to develop, buy or otherwise control ad- 
ditional sources of crude supplies in other 
countries, competitive interests in those 
countries have been retaliating by increased 
investments of capital in the producing busi- 
ness in the United States, and by additonal 
alliances in this country for the assurance of 
continuance in crude supplies. While the 
production of the high-grade oils of the 
Eastern fields has held up well during the 
year, it has been much less than the quan- 
tity called for by the demands of consump- 
tion, and in consequence the stocks have 
been drawn upon to such an extent as nearly 
to wipe them out. In the Ohio-Indiana 
fields the production of the Lima classifica- 
tion has also been less than the consumption, 
and there has been an according drawing on 
the stocks. The increase in production for 
the year has been in the lower-grade oils. 

Exports, of petroleum and its products 
during 1905 will probably total over 1,100,- 
000,000 gallons, equal to more than 26,000,- 



000 barrels of 42 gallons each. The value 

of this product is upwards of $70,000, 1, 

It exceeds the exports of the previous year 
by fully 100,000,000 gallons, but with a rela- 
tive valuation slightly less on account of ihc 
cutting of prices in the foreign trade. More 
than two-thirds of the exports, or over 
80,000,000 gallons, were illuminating oils. 



A government report recently issued gives 
interesting information concerning the com- 
parative values of petroleum from various 
fields in heat-producing qualities. The re- 
port says that the calorific or heat-producing 
property of petroleum when combined with 
proper proportions of air is measured by the 
number of pounds of water from and at 212 
deg. F. evaporated by 1 pound of petroleum 
fuel. It has also been determined that the 
heat energy necessary to evaporate 1 pound 
of water would raise 966 pounds of water at 
or near 391 deg. F. 1 deg., which is usually 
written B. T. U. for British Thermal Unit. 
The French Thermal standard is the "Cal 
orie," and is the quantity of heat necessary 
to raise one kilogram (2.2046 pounds) 
of water 1 deg. centigrade (18 deg. F.). The 
B. T. U. is, therefore, only equal to 0.252 
caloric. The following table shows the com- 
partaive value of fuel petroleum from the 
principal fields of the United States and 
Russia, the first column of figures giving 
the specific gravity of the oils and the sec- 
ond column the number of pounds of water 
evaporated in boilers at 212 deg. F. : 

Pennsylvania crude 8291 14.85 

Pennsylvania crude heavy. . .8860 16.00 

Ohio, 'Lima 8383 15.45 

Texas, Beaumont , . .9210 14.80 

Texas, Sour Lake 9333 144° 

Louisiana, Jennings 9090 14.60 

California, Bakersfield 9589 14.20 

Russia, Baku 8805 14.80 

There is a larger valuation in the fuel 
value of coal than there is in the fuel valu- 
ation of petroleum, as shown by further 
comparisons in the report. For convenience 
of comparison of petroleum and coal, it is 
assumed that 1 pound of average petroleum 
will evaporate 15 pounds of water from and 
at 212 deg. F. as compared with 1 pound of 
coal and it is shown that one pound of petro- 
leum of from .82 to .88 gravity is equal ap- 
proximately to 2 pounds of the various 
grades of eastern bituminous and anthracite 
coal, while its value is almost three times 
as much pound for pound, as the lower grade 
western coals. In these proportions a ton 
of coal (2,000 pounds) of the lower grades 
represents in calorific value from 2% barrels 
of petroleum to 4 1 _• barrels as compared 
with the higher grades of Pennsylvania and 
West Virginia coal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Mews from the Field 



{ II The Pennsylvania Oil Co. have had a fish- 



COALINGA. 



The production of the Coalinga field for 
the month of December, 1905, was 780,000 
barrels. 

In the case of the M. K. & T. Co. the price 
of oil has been raised to 17V2 cents on daily 
runs. We are told that offers have been 
made as high as 25 cents for long time con- 
tracts, but do not know of any one else who 
has received such an offer. 

California and New York Oil Co.'s well 
No. 3 is about 800 feet deep with 10-inch 
drive pipe, and going nicely. Formation 
about the same as that encountered in their 
No. 1 well. 

California Monarch Oil Co.'s records show 
that they have trebled the production of 
their property in Sec. 21-19-15 in the six 
months ending December 31, 1905. The new 
wells are showing up fine, the old wells are 
responding to the treatment of up-to-date 
methods applied and are showing marked 
improvement. Supt. A. B. Canfield has 
proven his ability as an oil well man, the 
man to handle their property, resourceful and 
experienced, giving intelligent application of 
modern methods used in this progressive 
field. 

The Caledonian Crude has completed a 
new reservoir, and now has a storage capa- 
city of 35,000 barrels, of which 25,000 is full 
of oil. ■- ;]§ 

Call No. 1, which was finished at 1866 
feet, with 6-inch casing, is now being deep- 
ened, with '4y 2 -inch pipe. At 1886 feet Su- 
perintendent Livermore reports a good sand, 
from which the oil rose 400 feet in the hole. 

The Home Oil Company's product is said 
to be holding up remarkably well, not hav- 
ing decreased at all in the "past year and 
showing a remarkable increase over that of 
two years ago. The old "Blue Goose" well 
still leads in productivity, although it has 
produced constantly for the past six or seven 
years. The theory of there being a constant 
supply to the sand into which the Home 
wells are drilled is well substantiated by the 
fact that the amount of oil already pumped 
from it couldn't be half put back into the 
space occupied by the productive sand as 
defined by a thorough test by drilling all 
around it. It is believed that the Home Oil 
Company will have an excellent production 
for many years and will "pay out" many 
times the present price of the stock. 



The Michigan Oil and Development Com- 
pany has a derrick up in the White Creek 
district and will commence operations soon 
on an excellent prospect there. Seepage oil 
from this district indicates a very good 
quality resembling that produced on the 
Home and Coalinga oil companies' property. 

Lucile Oil Company is 2ipo.feet deep with 
No. 1 well. A fair showing of oil was en- 
countered at this depth but there has been 
a great deal of difficulty in shutting off the 
water. The recent assessment of the com- 
pany is now delinquent. 

•California and New York Oil Company's 
No. 1 well is now the largest producer in 
the Coalinga field. 

On Wednesday afternoon California-Mon- 
arch No. 1 on the Guthrey lease commenced 
to spout a fair stream of oil with terrific 
gas pressure. The management believes that 
the well is now well under control and that 
as the gas is relieved the quantity of oil 
will be much increased. This well should 
eventually prove one of the very best on 
the west side. 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria, Cal, Jan. 17th. 

Nothing new has transpired recently in 
the field, but work on all wells continue on. 
Only two wells in six months have been 
abandoned. That proves the field and the 
faith in the future of it. 

The Union Oil Company has twenty 
strings of tools down, all around and about 
proven territory, and as one by one they 
come in, they yield large productive oil 
wells. Some of the wells have to be care- 
fully guarded lest they gush. 

The town of Orcutt, the oil town of Santa 
Barbara county, is still forging ahead. Sev- 
eral new buildings and residences are going 
up. The Union Oil Company has just fin- 
ished a very large new warehouse, and their 
Lompoc pipe line department has a new 
office. 

The Claremont well, two miles west of 
Orcutt, is down something over 2500 feet 
and they have passed the thin oil strata ; 
this is new territory and the outcome is be- 
ing watched. 

On the Newhall lease at a much greater 
depth, oil has been found in the usual large 
amounts, but as yet no test has been made 
of the quantity of the oil. 



Ving job for two or three weeks, but they 
I :thave recovered their tools and are going 
' down again. 

The Pacific Coast Oil Co. has extended its 
pipe line, at least a connecting branch, to 
the Santa Maria Oil Co.'s new well (the 
Kaiser property). The oil is 28 gravity and 
flows without pumping. 

The Radium Oil Co. is said to be in oil, but 
are uncertain as to the production and will 
give it a test. 

The Goodwin & Tietzen well No. 1 is go- 
ing down to oil with already an assurance 
of success. 

The Brookshire Oil Co. is said to have 
branched out to investigate an entirely new 
field at Summerland, on the ocean beach be- 
low Santa Barbara. They are going down 
to test the deep oil sands and see if they 
can get the larger oil production that is 
found in the deep wells here. 

In the annual review some complaint was 
made that we overestimated the storage 
amount of this field. Very little actual stor- 
age is carried over, that is true, but the 
earth dams of oil of the Union Oil Com- 
pany's big gusher helps to contribute their 
large quota of this storage amount. 

This fact is self-evident^the companies 
in the Santa Maria field are not going to 
produce a great big surplus as the)' did in 
the Kern field. This overproduction has been 
a menace to the oil business, an experience 
we shall not have to encounter here. Wells 
are bored and when the oil is not in demand 
the oil will remain in the well- and not out 
of it to hammer down prices. As the de- 
mand keeps increasing — as it is bound to — 
wells that flow out can quickly supply the 
demand, especially as the oil can be rapidly 
pipe-lined to Port Harford, at the sea coast. 

L. E. B. 



KERN COUNTY. 



Bakersfield, CaL, Jan. 19, 1906. 
Shipments of oil by rail from the Kern 
River field for January so far have not been 
up to the amount shipped during December 
1905. December shipments by rail were 
3,150 cars, of an average capacity of 230 
barrels per car, making a total for the month 
of 724,500 barrels, shipped by rail. The 
total production of the field for the same 
month was 1,050,000 barrels. January pro- 
duction or shipments neither have so far 
equaled this amount in proportion. 

A few shipments by pipe line have been 
made, but the Standard Line has been in 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ation but a short time during the month, 
and rims through the line have linn incon- 
siderable. 

The Southern Pacific riffled line to Delano 
has been under tc~t for the greater part of 
the week. The first tost was made with 
water to discover any possible weak ]>< >in t - 
in the line. Some few leaks have been dis- 
covered and the line lias burst in a few places 
under the pressure. The engineers hope to 
finish the tests before many days when the 
line will be put into active operation pump- 
ing oil. 

The Union < Ml Company's 500.000 barrel 
reservoir is completed, with the exception of 
a few finishing touches on the roofing. Con- 
trary to general expectation the Union will 
not commence work on another reservoir, 
although they have the land bought near the 
one just completed. So far the company has 
shown no dispositon whatever to enter the 
Kern River market as a purchaser of oil. 
This has been a disappointment to many of 
the independent producers who expected to 
find another buyer of oil besides the Stand- 
ard and th Associated oil companies. 

The new reservoir of the Associated Oil 
Co., with a capacity of 500,000 barrels, near 
the Union's and just north of their last one 
completed, is rapidly being finished. When 
this reservoir is finished the Associated will 
have ample storage for the Independent 
Agency's oil for some time to come. 

Xo definite action was taken at the meet- 
ing of the Board of Directors of the Inde- 
pendent Producers' Agency, which was re- 
cently held at their offices in the field. As 
some months will elapse before their present 
contract with th Associated Oil Co. expires, 
it is safe to say that it will be then before 
the public knows anything of their plans for 
disposing of their next year's oil, or the 
terms under which the present contract with 
the Associated will be renewed. 

At the expiration of their contract with 
the Standard Oil Co., which expired the lat- 
ter part of 1905, the Monte Cristo Oil Co. 
made another contract with the Standard for 
three years on the same terms as the pre- 
vious one. This will dispose of Monte 
Cristo production for the next three years. 

F. J. Carman, who was unsuccessful in 
finding the deep oil sand in his well on the 
Crace Oil Co.'s lease, is cleaning the well 
out and will pump from the oil sand found 
at about 1400 feet. In shooting off the pipe 
with dynamite a charge exploded prema- 
turely and shattered three strings of pipe. 
For two weeks past the drilling crew has 



engaged in fishing for and pulling this 

damaged pipe, and will take some lime 
longer before the well is perforate.! and put 
on the pump for the upper sand. 

The Sacramento Oil Co. has Started up 
pumping their wells, and have also com 
menced work on an old well that has practi- 
cally to he redrilled in order to bring its 
production up to thi standard of the other 

wells on the lease 

Four ( >il Co. will redrill naother well on 

their lease that has some bad pipe in ami 
when finished will considerably increase the 
production of this lease. 

The Kern River < >il Co. have nearly fin- 
ished covering their reservoir, which has a 
capacity of 125.000 barrels. 'Phis reservoir 
was finished all but roofing' some time ago, 
but the company had no use for any storage 
until recently. 

Imperial Oil Co. is finishing up the last 
of the wells commenced the latter part of 
1905. This company will do more develop- 
ment work at once, unless call is made on 
them for more oil daily than their present 
production supplies. 

It is reported that the Fearless Oil Co.'s 
well at McKittrick, which has been such an 
immense gas well, has at last commenced to 
flow some oil with the gas, as Mr. Jones, the 
superintendent of the company, said when 
the gas was first struck, he hoped when the 
gas pressure had diminished some to strike 
a good flow of oil. No authentic reports of 
how much oil the well was actually doing 
has reached here. 

The Rival Oil Co., fourteen miles from 
McKittrick, adjoining the Chanslor Canfield 
properties, has commenced work on a well 
that will be completed soon as possible. Mr. 
Seiple, who has charge of the active opera- 
tions, left for McKittrick Wednesday and 
will get everything in shape to commence 
drilling tr once. C. W. 



THE SOUTHERN FIELDS. 



Los Angeles, January 17th. 

The acquisition of oil rights by the Amal- 
gamated Oil Company on lands just west 
of its Salt Lake properties may or may not 
lead to early developments in the local situ- 
ation. The syndicate making the purchase 
of the lands, some 3000 acres, on what is 
known as the Hammel-Denker ranch, ex- 
tending from Pico street extension to the 
town of Sherman, is composed almost en- 
tirely of men connected with the Associated 
and Amalgamated companies. They are C. A. 
Canfield, Burton E. Green, W. C. Price. W. 
G. Kerckhoff and others. They may be de- 
pended upon to look out for the oil interests 
involved. 

The primary object in purchasing the 
greater part of the land is, however, for sub- 



rlh ision and sale for res i 

purposes, VbOUt 300 acre-, lying <\\\c west 
of the present oil field, may prove good terri- 

torj for oil development and 

nay be undertaken as the needs of the 
market call for actio,,. | he balance will be 
sol. I and provision made that no wells -hall 
be drilled near any of this property, a- such 
a course would ruin il for residence pur- 
po es, The tract, however, is large enough 
to accommodate all interests without fric- 
tion. 

The agitation for the wiping out of the 
wells in the Westlake district in the city 
continues. Derricks are being taken down 
all the time and the material sold for what 
it may bring. Some of the owners have 
held conferences to see what can be done 
to check the movement against their wells 
but they seem to have devised no way out. 
Despite the low price and insignificant pro- 
duction per well an owner of, say, twenty 
wells, can make a fair sum monthly. If each 
pumps three barrels a day for thirty days a 
month and the price is thirty cents at the 
well, it is easy to figure that this means $540 
a month and expense of pumping, as it is 
done here, is slight, $125 a month covering- 
it without difficulty. This means a profit of 
$3 X 5> so that there is still something to be 
done from Los Angeles city oil. With the 
Amalgamated about to enter the road oil 
market, however, the outlook becomes 
blacker than ever and more rapid extinction 
will undoubtedly be the old field's fate. 

In reference to the South American trade 
and the Union's pipe line franchise at Pan- 
ama an Associated man states that investi- 
gations all show the existence of vast de- 
posits of oil on the coast of South and Cen- 
tral America, some near Panama, which, if 
developed, would furnish oil cheaper than it 
could be shipped. For this reason he does 
not believe the trade will be permanent and 
does not believe that a pipe line at Panama 
will be as great a thing for the company 
operating it as is generally expected. 

That oil exists on the coast of Ecuador 
near Guayaquil is also the opinion of Suth- 
erland Hutton, a well known man in oil cir- 
cles, who visited that region some years 
since in the interests of trade. To get this 
out is so serious a problem, owing to the 
fever prevailing along the entire coast, that 
it is likely to be many years before it is done. 
At Panama, too, there are good indications 
and a little over a year ago an expedition 
was organized by Californias to prospect for 
it but the plan fell through owing to dis- 
putes among those interested. The existence 
of high grade paraffin oil in the And. 
Peru has been established by the Titicaca 
Oil Company, composed of Los Angel, 
among them Director M. H. Whittier of the 
Associated, the only question being as to the 
amount. A. R. II. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Tests Showing that Natural Gas is in 
Solution with Water 



A. S. Cooper, M. E. 

First. If a stand pipe with the upper end number of pulsations occurring in a given 
open is screwed to the casing of a well time can be ascertained by fixing a pedom- 
yielding water and natural gas by an artesian eter to the walking beam or other suitable 
flow, and if the stand pipe is of sufficient part of the pumping machinery. Knowing 
height when nearly filled with water" to the amount of water discharged at each 
counterbalance the hydrostatic pressure of pulsation of the pump and the number of 
the well and the natural gas acting as a gas- pulsations, the amount of water raised from 
lift the water will cease to flow and the gas the bottom of the well in a given time can 
will cease to flow. be found by a computation. Arrange a re- 

The St. Agnes well at Stockton ceased to ceiver so as to catch the gas flowing from 
flow water or gas. A ditch was cut from the wel1 and trie gas liberated by decrease of 
the well to the slough and four feet cut off pressure from the lifted water. Measure the 
the well pipe. The well now flows sixteen ? as b . v a gas meter. By this method the 
cubic feet of gas and a large amount of amount of water and gas coming from the 
water. we " can be ascertained. 

A well at Huntington Beach, Los Angeles Sixth. Gas pumps arp sometimes used for 

count)-, does not yield gas except when 
water is pumped from the well. 

Second. If a well is capped and a cock 
placed in the cap and the cock partly closed 
so that the well will only flow half as much 
water as when not capped, the well will 
only yield half as much gas. 

Third. If the well is rapidly bailed with 
a bailer the well will yield much more gas 
and much more water. Frequently the well 
will flow violently. 

Fourth. When a bailer with a valve at 
each end of the same, Fig. I, the valves 
opening inwardly is lowered into a well so 
as to rest on the bottom of the well the 
valves will be opened by the weight of the 
bailer an4 cable, provided the bailer is at- 
tached to the upper valve. When the bailer 
is filled with water with gas in solution is 
lifted from the bottom of the well the pres- 
sure of the water in the bailer will close the 
bottom valve and the weight of the water 
in the bailer and the weight of the bailer 
will close the upper valve. If the bailer is 
withdrawn from the well and a pressure 
gauge attached to a cock which has been 
fitted to the bailer for that purpose the pres- 
sure of the gas in the bailer can be obtained 
then by a computation which will give the 
amount of gas in solution with the water 
at the bottom of the well. 

Fifth. If a deep well pump is lowered to 
the bottom of a well and the same operated 
the amount of water discharged by the 
pump can be ascertained in the following 
manner : Find the quantity of water dis- 
charged by each pulsation of the pump. The 




Flo <■ 



creating a vacuum in a gas well where the 
well does not flow water. This vacuum rare- 
ly exceeds eleven pounds to the square inch. 
The removal of the pressure of a column of 
the atmosphere equal to eleven pounds to 
the square inch is the same as the removal 
of a column of water about twenty-three 
feet in height. The decrease of pressure 
liberates the gas from solution with water. 
Fig. 2 shows arrangement for pumping 
water or oil and saving the natural gas. 

i. Walking beam. 

3. Adjuster. 

4. Adjusting board. 



5. Adjusting tee bolt. 

6. Polished rod. 

7. Stuffing box. 

8. Tubing coupling. 

9. Tee. 

10. Pipe to separator. 

11. Tubing. 

12. Sucker rods. 

13. Sucker rod straps. 

14. Tubing ring. 

15. Casing head. 

16. Gas pipe. 

17. Drive pipe. 

18. Casing. 

19. Cock leading to meter. 

20. Separator. 

21. Water sealing. 

22. Water overflow. 



Texas Output 30,354.263 
Barrels 



Texas produced 30,354,263 barrels of crude 
petroleum in 1905 — the greatest yield of oil 
ever credited to the state in a single year. 

In 1904 California's output was 29,649,434 
barrels, the largest production recorded up 
to that time, entitling the Pacific Coast 
state to occupy first place in the list of 
petroleum producing states. Texas was sec- 
ond in 1904 with 22,241,413 barrels. The 
gain in this state in 1905 over the record 
for the preceding year was 8,162,850 barrels. 

If California does not show an increase in 
1905 over its 1904 production Texas will top 
the list in 1905. All but 595,306.82 barrels 
of the Texas output came from the Gulf 
Coast districts in the southeastern part of 
the state, which produced 29,808,956.86 bar- 
rels against 21,520,175 barrels in 1904, an in- 
crease of 8,288,781.86 barrels. 

Of the 595,306.82 barrels produced in the 
districts outside of Southeast Texas, 50,000 
barrels are credited to the Matagorda or Big 
Hill field. In 1904 the output of the Mata- 
gorda pool was 151,936 barrels. The wells 
were drowned out by salt water and on De- 
cember 31, 1905, the three that were on the 
pump were making 20 barrels, which repre- 
sents the present output of the field. 

Corsicana, the light oil district n Navarro 
county, which was developed n 1896 and 
1897, before the Southeast Texas regon was 
opened up, produced 312,595 barrels in 1905 
against 374,318 barrels in 1904, a decrease of 
61,723 barrels. Powell, the heavy oil district 
near Corsicana, produced 131,051 barrels 
against 129,329 barrels in 1904, a gain of ■ 
1,722 barrels. An extension of the proven 
field at Powell in the last three months 
promises to increase the output considerably 
this year. 

The Clay county field, sometimes called 
Henrietta, lying farther north than Corsi- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



and producing high grade oil from wells 
only J75 I in improvement 

in production in 1905, yielding ioi, 
barrels, against 65,455 barrels in 1904, an in- 
of 36,205.82 barrels. Wells in this 
district do not cost more than $400 and are 
operated at a minimum expense. 

The production of the Corsicana and Clay 
county fields 417.j55.82 barrels, represents 
the total light oil output of Texas. All of 
the Corsicana product and 66,160.32 barrels 
of the Clay county oil went to the refineries. 
1 >il testing 28 degrees, Baumc, is found at 
Powell and at Batson, one of the Southeast 
Texas districts. Most of the Southeast 
Texas oil, however, tests 20 to 24 degrees 
gravity. 

The great increase in Southeast Texas 
production resulted from the unprecedented 
output at Humble, the Harris county dis- 
trict, where a 7,000 barrel gusher, brought 
in on January 7 by D. R. Beatty, started 
development on a big scale. The productive 
area in this field has proven larger than in 
any other Southeast Texas district, being 
about two miles from northeast to south- 
west. Six weeks ago additional extensions 
of territory were made to the northeast. The 
wells have not been steady producers, as a 
rule, nor have they been as large as some 
developed in Hardin and Jefferson coun- 
ties, but drilling operations have been car- 
ried on at a lively pace throughout the year. 
Those who have made money producing oil 
at Humble are a lonesome minority. Sev- 
eral wells have yielded nearly a million bar- 
rels each. The close of the year, however, 
witnessed a decline in the field, and during 
the last month the output, which in June 
was above 100.000 barrels a day, averaged 
less than 20,000 barrels a day. 

During the twelve months of 1905 the 
Humble field produced 18,066,428.22 barrels 
of oil — the greatest quantity ever put out by 
a Southeast Texas district, not even except- 
ing Spindletop, which reached ts zenith in 
1902 with 17,420,949 barrels. In addition to 
the 18,066,428.22 barrels, Humble produced 
75,000 barrels of inferior product, not includ- 
ed in the runs from the field, making a total 
gross output of 18,141,428.22 barrels for the 
year. 

The June output of the Humble district 
was 3,207,019.41 barrels, and this month 
proved a banner one in the Southeast Texas 
region, making a record of 4,150,090.35 bar- 
rels of oil produced. 

Prices went as low as 13 cents for oil at 
the wells at Humble, just before the fire 



occurred in July in which 2,1 irrels 

of oil went up in smoke. The held had at- 
tained its highest point in production in 
June, and the decline in output, coupled 

with the loss of such a large quantity' of oil, 

caused the market to strengthen. At the 
close of tin- year credit balance prices was 
38 cents and the contract price 40 cents. 

Batson, the big field in [904, during which 
year it produced 10,904,737 barrels, dropped 

to 3,790,628.6] barrels in 1905. In one day 
in the month of March, 1904, this district 
put out 151,000 barrels of oil. During De- 
cember. 1905, it averaged only 8,000 barrels 
a day. 

Sour Lake, with a record of 8,848459 bar- 
rels — including a small production from 
Saratoga — in 1903, made 3,369,012.10 barrels 
in 1905, and Spindletop, now five years old 
as an oil field, produced 1,600,378.50 barrels. 
In December the Spindletop wells failed to 
make 3,000 barrels a day. the month's output 
being 89,701.48 barrels. In Fel-ruary the 
runs from Spindletop were 200,056 barrels, 
averaging 7,000 barrels a day. 

Rail shipments of Southeast Texas oil in 
1905, representing consumption as fuel by 
railroads, power plants and other industries 
in Texas, amounted to 7,881,550.31 barrels, 
against 7,067,673 barrels in 1904, an increase 
of 813,877.31 barrels. 

Shipments of crude oil from Port Arthur 
and Sabine in 1905 amounted to 6,595,706.12 
barrels against 10,031,459 barrels in 1904, a 
decrease of 3,435,752.28 barrels. The South- 
east Texas refineries increased their runs 
very largely handling an average of more 



than 600,000 barrels a month, the estimate 

for the \ear being 7,000,000 barrels. 

In addition to the tank car shipments of 

products from the Southeast 1 v, refin- 
eries, 3,887,091.14 barrels went by v 
from Port Arthur and Sabine to Atlantic 
Coast points and to Euro] I I consump- 

tion of Southeast Texas refined and lubri- 
cating oils was greatly extended in 1905. 
Several of the Southern states, among them 
Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi, get a 
large part of the kerosene they use from the 
Beaumont-Port Arthur refineries. New Eng- 
land and New York, Pittsburg and Phila- 
delphia, have been invaded by the distri- 
butors of Texas refinery products. The At- 
lantic Coast lubricating oil works of the 
Standard Oil Company and other companies 
are running Southeast Texas crude, and the 
prospect for a wider use of the Gulf Coast 
product in 1906 is assured. 

Gross shipments and consumption of 
Southesat Texas oil, including losses by fire 
and allowances for water and waste accom- 
panying the us« of earthen storage, amount- 
ed to 25,316,178.43 barrels in 1905. Of this 
quantity 14,477,256.43 barrels constituted the 
rail and port shipments, 2,238,922 barrels the 
amount consumed by fires at Humble and 
Sour Lake, 7,000,000 barrels run by the re- 
fineries, 1,000,000 barrels the loss attendant 
upon storing- some 10,000,000 barrels of oil 
in open storage, and 600,000 barrels, field 
consumption. 

Deductions from the total are made on 
account of oil shipped from one point to an- 
other in trainloads, and delivered into pipe 
lines, this being equivalent to transporting 
the oil by pipe line and being nothing more 
than a transfer from one field to another. 
The amount of such rail shipments in 1905 
was 1,489,489.75 barrels, of which 1,177,462 
barrels went from Jennings to Beaumont 



A BIG MARKET 



There has been a big market, a tremendous advance in the price of stocks during 
the past three weeks. We bought 10,000 shares for one of our customers and sold it at 
an advance of 140 to 180 per cent. Another big order we bought some months ago at 
55 to 60 cents and sold at 85 to 90 cents. Another order was for 10,000 at 16 to 20 
cents, which we sold at -J2 to 90 cents. We have filled a number of such orders. Can 
we do anything for you? There is big money in good stocks if you buy right. 

Your orders will be promptly filled according to your instructions or your money 
returned. We solicit nart of your business. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A-IO, RIALTO BUILDING 
SAN FRANCISCO, * * CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



and Sabine. This oil is considered as a ship- 
ment from Jennings. The net consumption 
of Southeast Texas oil was 23,826,688.6s 
barrels, against an output of 29,808,956.86 
barrels, making the surplus of production 
over consumption 5,982,268.18 barrels. 

Stocks of oil on hand in Southeast Texas 
at the close of 1904 were estimated at 13,- 
352,920 barrels. Adding the 1905 surplus 
gives a total of 19,335,188.18 barrels on hand 
December 31, 1905. — Oil Invertos' Journal. 

Coal Oil Johnny 



Tohn Steele, known throughout the world 
years ago as "Coal Oil Johnny." is said to 
be nearing death in poverty in a little house 
on the Moffatt farm at Fee, a few miles 
from Franklin, Pa. He is now 64 years old, 
and the physicians say he cannot shake off 
the grip of pneumonia that is claiming his 
life. 

The spending feats of Steele were per- 
formed for the most part in the then un- 
settled oil regions, where his fortune had 
come to him in his youth as windfall. There 
have been spenders since, but none like this 
young lad. Besides having $3,000,000 to 
start on, he had an income from royalties of 
something like $1,000 a day, but it was all 
pin money to him. 

One of his favorite tricks was- to light his 
cigars with $100 bills. He had a band im- 
ported from New York to play for him while 
he ate and had his own private opera troupes 
in his own opera house in a suburb of Oil 

City. 

One day he became angry with the owner 
of a 'hotel in Bradford, Pa., and asked him 
what he would take for the place. The sum 
named was something fearful, but Steele 
never batted an eye. He paid the price out 
of his vest-pocket and walked into the street, 
and, meeting a broken-down friend, said : 

"Here, take this hotel. I don't know what 
to do with it." 

Steele made one trip to New York which 
will be always remembered by those fortu- 
nate enough to meet him. He performed 
feats in money spending while there which 
would make the ordinary Pittsburg million- 
aire of today look like a "piker." 

Steele's wealth came to him from the Mc- 
Clintock farm, now a part of Oil City, Pa. 
In the early '60s it was found to .be the 
storm center of the big oil pool. Mrs. Mc- 
Clintock, a widow, refused to sell the farm 
outright, but, taking an immense fortune, 
also held a royalty on all wells drilled on 
her place. Soon she could not count her 
money, but it was over $1,000,000 in cash in 
1862, when Mr. McClintock made the last 
sad mistake of trying to light her stove -with 
coal oil. She was burned to death. 

Mrs. McClintock had one foster child, 
"Johnny" Steele, and he came into all her 
money. He was but 20 years old, and could 
not touch the fortune until he became of age. 
By that time it had rolled into $3,000,000, 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 




Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Gal. 



WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, 
Toilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind 



P&B 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 



Mills 

COALINGA, CAL. 



^m®&^ 




^^o^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



money multiply in th< 

When the fortum 
turned over t.> him young Si ' one 

breath and began n> spend. 

•t his meteoric career of seven months, 
I ( >il Johnny," with even the interest 
in the <>KI McClintock farm gone, went t' 
making nil barrels at $1.25 per day. Later, 
with the aid of friends, he wrote a book 
called "Coal <'il Johnny — His Book," but it 
was not a success, lie has of late years 

living in Kansas on a rented farm, hut re- 
turned to Pennsylvania recently. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



The following dividends have been de- 
clared by oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and ( >il Exchang 

Peerless So. 14 

Caribou 07 

Thc Bullfrog Extension tunnel has 

reached a depth of [90 feet, all in solid ore 
and work is progressing satisfactorily. Their 
shaft on Delaware Claim No. 2 is now 108 
feet deep and for about 10 feet the shaft has 
been passing through stringers of white 
<|iiartz with preen stains which pans well 
and it is believed that the main ledge will 
he struck at any time. 

The Original Bullfrog have been unable 
to start up their hoisting machinery owing 
to the lack of a part of their sallows frame. 
The delay has been annoying but they be- 
lieve they will lie able to >tart up work in 
a very short time. Where the machinery is 
to be located, their shaft is already 67 feet 
deep. 

The Bullfrog- West Extension has not 
been doing work for some eight or ten days 
but it is reported that work will be resumed 
soon. 

It is reported on good authority that the 
Big Bullfrog, lying south of these proper- 
tics about one-half mile, after sinking over 
100 feet, made a crosscut and are now in a 
twelve-foot ledge that shows good values by 
panning. They have opened up a big ledge 
of milling values with streaks of shipping 
ore. 

The Goldfrog Big C that lice, north and 
west of the Bullfrog Extension have driven 
their tunnel to a distance of 225 feet and 
are now in a very favorable formation, 
showing some values. They are also drift- 
ing on eight-foot talc ledge and they expect 
to strike good ore in this drift. 

DO YOU OWN DEAD MINING STOCK? 



If you have any dead ones, write us the 
name of the company and how many shares 
you have and how much cash you paid for 
them. Then we will show you how to save 
your money. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 
(Incorporated) 

A 10 Rialto Building, 

San Francisco - - California 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Asiayeri and Cheroltts) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NtVADA 

v* ill Examine and Report on Mines 

Can nHNtfit on purchnsa of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



MAPS 



The Pacific Oil Reporter carries a full line of up- 
to-date Maps of the California Oil Fields at prices 
ranging from 50c to $10.00. Blue Prints, White 
Prints, Maps on Cloth, etc. Let us know your 
requirements. 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

318 Pine Street San Francisco 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of' stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Standing price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will s inn be gone, when a second installment 
will he offered at $15.00, to be follow 1 hv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



FOR SALE AT A BARGAIN 



Controlling interest in well known oil company in the Coalinga district. 
Oil contracted to the Coalinga Oil and Transportation Co. at 19 cents per 
barrel, contract to run until Feb. 1, 1906. 

Company has forty acres of one-eighth royalty leased land and is well lo- 
cated. 

Property free from debt. Wells equipped with tools and all apparatus for 
operating. 

Same can be secured by paying part cash and the balance on such terms 
as the purchaser may desire to make. 

Full particulars will be furnished on application, either personally or by 
letter. 

Address communications to F. J. C, care Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine 
street, San Francisco. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, January 17th : 
Associated — 

770 shares at $54.00 

Caribou — 

50 shares at 6 . 50 

100 shares at 7.00 

Claremont — 

500 shares at . . .~ 1 . 10 

Chicago Crude (New) — 

600 shares at 08 

Four — 

1200 shares at 35 

Independence — 

6goo shares at 15 

1600 shares at .... 16 

Oil City Petroleum — 

500 shares at 73 

Peerless — 

100 shares at 7.00 

Superior — 

1247 shares at 05 

1200 shares at 06' 

Twenty Eight — 

100 shares at 7 . 50 

Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 
Bid. 

Alma 25 

Arline . $0.35 

Apollo 05 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer.. . 54.00 
California-Standard ... .37 

Caribou 6. 50 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago. Crude New 08 

Claremont 1 . 00 

Forty . . ' 47 

Four 30 

Giant 50 

Hanf ord 260 . 00 

Home 40 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 13 

Junction 



Asked. 

.50 

$0.38 

.08 

55-00 

.42 

7.00 

.09 

1 . 10 

•50 

.35 



•5° 

.20 

16.00 

•15 
.20 



.40 



12 

09 

14 

77V-2 

70 



Kaweah 

Kern 13 . 50 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 

Linda Vista 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona. . 

Monte Cristo 

Oil City Petroleum . . . 

Peerless 6.00 

Radium 15 

Piedomnt 06 

Radium 10 

Reed Crude .26 

Senator 1 . 60 

Shawmut 

Sovereign 21 

Sterling . 1 .30 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5. 00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 7 . 00 

Union 163.00 

West Shore 1 .40 

Wolverine . . . S ; 



•3° 
9.00 

.11 
.16 
.80 

•73 
9.00 

.07 
.20 
.28 

.40 
.29 

1.60 
.06 

6-75 

8.00 
165.00 

i-75 
1.00 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1552 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 



219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for OH or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling [ 

Prices Reasonable IrSi 

BOX 237 . w# E# YOULE 




WANTED 



Good Second hand 

Rigs 
Oil Well Tools 

OH Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe, Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOR ESTIMATES 

W1W. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago, Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



1 i 



Print* loom 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



J15-3I7-JH-32I-32J 
Pile St,. S. F. 



Open ETenings 
Music Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MT'G. CO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SEVENTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal. Corpse ..... . . Four (4) 

Hills Bros. . . . ." Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



'7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
F.AIRBANKS, MORSII CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Angeles 



Seattle 




pe sure to \>e properly equipped for your hunting trip. 
Vse'tlie- ■■STCVLN'S" an.l have the assurance that 
your i.hoi.c cangpt be improved upon, and that there 
Is no possibility of your game getting away when 
sighted by our guns. Our line:, 

RIFLES, PISTOLS, SHOTGUNS 




HU'HW 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for thr pro» 
motion ol any legitimate pioposl- 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gatlon, Mercantile, PateiU or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at Its Home Office. 



GO 



TO 



THE 



"pacific H oil ¥ep 



Ask your dealer, and 
insist en our goods. If 
you cann- tobtainthem 
we will ship direct, ex- 
preys prepaid, upon 
receipt of price. 



Don-t Fail to send for 
illustrated cataln^. Itis a 
l>ookofreadvrek-rcnceand 
nppealstoall interested in 
il.e grand sport of shoot- 
ing. Mnilcd for 4 cents in 
stamps to pay postage, 



HIT Til K MARK -with our RIFLE rUZZLE I This 
clever novelty will be mailed FREE upon request. 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., 
P. o. Box 4093. Chicopee falls, Mass., U.S.A, 

c 




Paul W. Prutzman 

113 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



. , . 



' '■ ■■ 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Tei. Mint 279' San Francisco 



A. ZELLERfiACH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

41b, 418 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Franclsct 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We c.mr the uftrKCat Stock. Our price, .re 

Equitable 
Tel. Main. 1188. 



PATENT S — United States and 

■■>»■>*■—■ Foreign. Trade 



Marks Registered. J. M. NESBIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon tram* The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. 

of machine for oil and gas works. It , ,. .. , „„_ ... .'.... 

mounted upon trucks eeparate. '*■ tests ran 9 e from sh aH°w water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made In Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

Barron. Rickard & McCone. California Agents, San Francisco 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



1 ASPHALTAGE' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



M A LT H A 



THE 



BRAND 









PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



E FINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
'i. Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. O F" F I O E S 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER. Jr.. Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ^— — — ~e CHICAGO OFFICE 



WHITEHALL BLOC, 17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



When writing: to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magazine describes 
California and the great West so 
well; none is mora beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils.* Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
MlSCAI.F ^CALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND . 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 
Phone James 7116 San Francisco, Cal. 

SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 




Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases Salts; Clay 



Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 

and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SAN. FRANCISCO 




i nis Kaper not II 
to be Uken from | 

- • • • » ■ 




Vol. 7, No. 13. 



San Francisco, Cal., January- 27, 1906. 



Price lO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



A.LESCHEN &S0NS ROPE CO. 

920-932 NORTH FIRST ST. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 



BRANCH OFFICES & WAREHOUSES: 
NEW YORK •• CHICAGO • ■ DENVER. 



WIRE ROPE LESCHEN'S 



OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION . 



DRILLING CABLES an "S AND LINES, 
a^°CASING a n° TUBING LINES. 




WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 
•AN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean* 
ing out, pumping, pulb 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jipply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 27, 1906 



Number 13 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' 
Association. 

Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 

Office and Editorial Rooms 
318 Pine Street San Francisco. California 
Telephone Bush 176. 

TERMS 

Chic Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 . 50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Advertising Rates on Request. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, 
Draft, or Registered Letter, addressed to 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San 
Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Communications 
must be accompanied by writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, 
California, as second-class matter. 

The Committee Headquarters of the "Oil 
Producers' Association" at No. 1 1 Mont- 
gomery street, this city, is getting to be a 
very busy place. Dozens of oil men, who 
have the interests of the industry at heart, 
call daily and discuss, pro and con, the pos- 
sibilities for the future. On all sides is 
shown the greatest enthusiasm, and the 
work of organization goes on uninterrupted- 
ly. A very pleasing feature in the organ- 
ization of the present Association is the fact 
that nearly all the members of the Independ- 
ent Oil Producers' Agency have signed up 
with the new organization. When the mat- 
ter was brought up at the last meeting of 
the Agency at P.akersfield a great deal of 
enthusiasm was shown. Every man with an 
interest in the indutsry, either directly or 
indirectly, should give his influential and 
financial support to the Association. A 
meeting of the members, now numbering 
nearly two hundred, will be held in this city 
shortly, but every effort is being made to 
bring in every independent producer before 
the meeting is called. 

From the figures gives in our annual re- 
port shownig the oil in storage at the close 
of 1905 one may, with little brain exertion, 
derive some very interesting conclusions. 
Suppose that we have 17,(113,000 barrels on 
hand (these figures are the extreme amount) 
what part of the same is salable? Has not a 
good proportion of it been in sump holes so 
long that it would be impossible to pipe it? 



The greater pan of the oil shown as field 
stocks at Santa Maria are represented in 
the product of one well which has been col- 
lected in reservoirs constructed by the dam- 
ming up of the canyon. As the oil is very 
volatile, and neither the oil or soil suitable 
for earthern storage, it is likely that little of 
it will he of value for any purpose unless it 
is road construction. The greater portion of 
the Sunset and Midway stock oil is as thick 
as tar on account of the evaporation of the 
lighter constituents and is not saleable. The 
same may be said of the stock oil at Coal- 
inga, and some of that at McKittrick. A 
goodly portion of the Kern River stock oil 
is in steel tanks and many of the reservoirs 
are constructed with a view of protecting 
the oil which no doubt is done ; yet there is 
much stock oil in Kern River that is little 
short of tar in consistency. The greater por- 
tion of the stock oil in the southern fields 
represents oil that is moved every few days. 
Where, then, is our great surplus of oil? 
We have none. We have simply a matter 
of eight or ten millions of barrels of saleable 
oil that would be moved in three months if 
the production was stopped. It is claimed 
by those whose judgment cannot be ques- 
tioned that stock oil is being rapidly drawn 
upon in the Kern field at the present time 
and we have no hesitancy in saying that we 
believe it is true. It is quite likely that the 
County Assessor will find a much less 
amount of oil in Standard tanks this year 
than he did last. As the figures of storage 
oil is given under oath it will be interesting 
to know just what the claims of the Stand- 
ard will be and as the assessment is made 
on a valuation of 10 cents per barrel it will 
be an easy matter to determine the facts in 
the case, as the records are open to all. 
There is no question in our mind that a cur- 
tailment of the present independent produc- 
tion would bring the marketers to terms and 
compel them to pay a reasonable price for 
the oil. 



One of the greatest evils attending the 
present development of our California oil 
fields is the susceptibility of the producing 
companies to the entering into long time 
contracts for the delivery of large quantities 
of oil to the marketers at a very slight ad- 
vance over current prices. In the past few 
months a number of contracts have been 
consummated involving several thousands of 
barrels daily for a period of three years or 
more and in no instance, so far as we can 
learn, was the price over twenty cents per 
barrel. No producer, or officer •>{ a produc- 
ing company, who had the best interests of 
the industry and of his corporation at heart, 
would lie a party to such a short-sighted 
transaction. It is a matter of sacrificing all 
possibility for better prices for the next 
three years to the compnay entering into 



such a contract, and, on the other hand,, in- 
jures every independent company in the 
State by aiding the marketers to fortify 
themselves against a shortage of oil by plac- 
ing in their hands a supply of contract oil 
which they can call upon at any time. Those 
closest in touch with the present condition 
of the California oil industry consider that 
fifty cents per barrel will be about an aver- 
age price for oil for the next three years — 
that is, for independent oil. While such a 
price is being received by those who are 
loyal to the best interests of the industry, 
of which their property is but a part, those 
who have allowed themselves to be flim- 
flammed into compromising contracts are 
likely to do some stunts at kicking. The * 
little independent stock oil to be found in 
the State is being eagerly picked up at a con- 
siderable advance in price over that offered 
a few months ago, and those who are willing 
to contract their oil at a figure around 20 
cents have no trouble in doing so. The time 
is not far distant when the marketers of oil 
will be obliged to scratch gravel to the tune 
of a much higher price than that now paid 
to enable them to secure a supply for the 
growing demand. Those who are wise 
enough to hang onto their product will be 
the gainers. 



The Pacific Coast Oil Co. ( Standard) has 
just consummated a deal with the West 
Shore Oil Company of Bake rsfield for the 
sale of 200,000 barrels of oil which the latter 
company has in storage. It is stated on good 
authority that the price paid was 20 cents 
per barrel. There is no doubt that the 
Standard Oil Company commences to antici- 
pate a shortage of oil in the near future or 
it wouldn't be seeking out storage oil at 
this advance in price over that paid in the 
past. Everything goes to show that a steady 
drain on stock oil is being made and will 
continue from this time on, and a pick up 
of 200,000 barrels in one lot is by no means 
a mean catch for the Standard. Other stock 
oil will doubtless be bought up as quickly 
and quietlv as possible but good prices will 
be paid where demanded. The man who 
will, at this stage of the industry, make con- 
tracts for large amounts of oil for future de- 
livery at the present price offered, is an ass. 
If stock oil is worth 20 cents daily produc- 
tion ought to be. 



An Enthusiastic Meeting of the Oil Pro- 
ducers' Association was held in this city on 
Thursday last, at which a goodly number of 
members were present. The matter of per- 
manent organization was taken up and a 
committee appointed to provide for the 
same, subject to the sanction of the organi- 
zation at a later date. The first general 
meeting of the organization will be held in 
this city some time during the first week of 
February. The date will be definitely fixed 
within the next few days and will be pub- 
lished in this journal next week, together 
with the progress of the committee. The 
spirit with which the producers are taking 
up the work of organization is away be- 
yond the expectations of its promoters and 
assures the signal success of the venture. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



THE WHITE CREEK DISTRICT 

A Prospective Oil Field Having Great Possi= 
bilities for the J\[ear Future. 



INCE its inception the Pacific Oil 
Reporter has at all times endeav- 
ored to keep its readers in touch 
with the development of the oil 
districts of California, especially the opening 




than twenty-five degrees. Considerable oak 
and pine cover the hills in this vicinity. 

Entering the White Creek valley from the 
south at the pont where it empties into the 
Los Gatos my attention is attracted by what 
appears to be a tall, white and slender pole 




On the Trail leading to the Quicksilver Mine being opened up by Boyle and others. 
Serpentine Hills in the Background. 



up of new fields. We have, of late, received 
several inquiries as to the possibilities of 
that part of Fresno County lying in the im- 
mediate vicinity of White Creekk, which 
empties into the Los Gatos Now that 

active operations have been commenced 
there the editor of this journal recently vis- 
ited the district and the property of the one 
corporation operating therein, and the fol- 
lowing is our opinion based upon a thor- 
ough examination of the immediate vicinity. 
From the town of Coalinga one passes out 
over a good road through a part of the de- 
veloped Coalinga oil field and into the valley 
of the Los Gatos. A short distance up the 
valley one is soon impressed by the 
great sedementary deposits, outcropping at 
regular intervals, ali pitching to the north- 
west on an angle of perhaps 35 degrees. 
Great ledges of alternate layers of sandstone 
and shale have been exposed by constant 
erosion. Hundreds of feet of this sediment- 
ary formation are represented in the two 
miles we traverse in passing up the valley 
of the Los Gatos to White Creek. I am told 
that many of these sands show tracing of oil 
at the outcrop with an occasional good seep. 
The angle of the dip flattens out gradually 
until at the point we enter the White Creek 
valley, Sec. 5-20-14, it is probably no more 



stuck endwise into a side hill. It is my first 
sight of the Agave American, or century 



which, in season, puts out a cluster of yel- 
low flowers. The flowers fade, leaving the 
dying stalk for a long time, which has in 
this case attracted my attention. The plant 
matures slowly, blossoms once, and dies. In 
Mexico the plant is known as "maguey," 
from which "pulque," the national beverage, 
is extracted. It has served the Mexicans for 
man}' other purposes from the earliest times. 
Its bruised leaves, properly dressed and pol- 
ished, make a sort of paper ; its leaves fur- 
nish a strong protecting thatch for roofs 01 
houses ; thread can be drawn from its long 
fibrous texture ; the thorns furnish a fair sub- 
stitute for pins and needles ; and the root, 
well prepared, is nutritious and palatble as 
food. The "pulque" in itself is a thoroughly 
wholesome and beneficial drink when taken 
in moderation, but from the root of the 
maguey strong distilled liquors are made 
called "mescal" and "tequila," and these are 
extremely intoxicating. It is an excellent 
fibre plant, but I do not know of its being 
used for fibre in this country. 

Passing up the White Creek valley 
through Sees. 25, 26 and 27, I find the first 
tracings of oil which are shown both by 
seepages from the soft sandstones and by 
the coloring on the water of the creek which 
had been flooded by recent rains. I exam- 
ined every outcropping and found strong 
evidence of oil in every case. Passing on 
through Sections 22,' 21 and the N. E. quar- 
ter of 20, through which the outcroppings 
pass with singular regularity, we reach Sec- 
tion 17, where I find the creek has cut 
through an immense ledge of conglomerate 
marine shells which is evidently the cap rock 
of the oil bearing sands which underlie it. 




Scene on Property of the Michigan Oil & Development Company, looking 
Southwest. Rig of the Company in Foreground. 

plant. The leaves are long and pointed with Taking saddle horses from this point we 
prickles along the edge, growing in a turf follow this shell formation through the en- 
like huge artichokes. From this turf comes tire township, traversing Sections 13, 14, 15, 
the stem, which shoots up to a great height, 16, 17 and 18. This shell formation, with 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



underlying oil bearing sands shows all the surface indications, with many 

ami shale, dips on an angle of about 20 de- seeps of light oil, indicating that the forma- 

the north, evidently underlying Sec- tion actually extends through township 

lion-. -, 8, 9, to, it and 12 and the south 10-14. it is so badly shattered in the 




Outcrop of^ the Shell Formation on Sec. 17 referred to in this article. Heavy Oil Seeps 
are'found along the Bed of the Creek in the Underlying Sand formation. 



half of Sections 2, 3, 4 and 5. The north 
half of Sections 2, 3, 4 and 5 are represented 
in the shape of a great range of serpentine 
rocks which have thrust their rugged heads 
hundreds of feet up through the more recent 
formations of sandstones, shales and shelis 
which lapse up onto its sides, causing them 
to pitch in the opposite direction, and, in all 
probability, forming a subterranean dam 
which retains the oil which seeps out in the 
s inds of which we have before spoken 

Following along the general slope where 
the sedimentary formation has been raised 
by the immense uplift of mineralized serpen- 
tine that extends across townships 19 S.. 
ranges 13. 14 and 15, really terminating at 
Oil City on the east and San Benito Peak 
on the west, we find about 20 miles of what 
seems to be a great natural basin that, as 
it seeps oil all around its highest edges or 
rim, necessarily contains a great supply of 
oil. From this vast pool we believe the 
high grade wells at Oil City draw their 
supply. Our reasoning for this is that Oil 
City has no outlet north, east or south,' as 
webs have been drilled which demonstrate 
this fact, but to the west there is a natural 
trough, through which its supply of oil must 
come, the hiffh grade oil being separated 
from the heavy oil south of Oil City by a 
great dyke that passes to the west, which, 
we believe, encloses the vast body of light 
oil that is found seeping through the White 
Creek territory. Our natural deduction is 
that under the center of township 19-13 will, 
be found the main pool or source of the Oil 
City supply of high grade oil. Intervening 
between Oil City and White Creek is a 
stretch of badly broken country. While it 



upheaval that while oil' men believe large 
wells will be found, they are chary about 
drilling these lands, owing, first, to the ex- 
pense, and perhaps because plenty of sure 
land was obtainable. Still, as light oil is the 



ly indebted for the kind hospitality exti 

me during my visit. 

The company has a comfortable camp 
established and it-- firsl derrick erected! I 

was informed that drilling would commence 

about the firsl of February next. From cal- 
culations taken at the time I believe that 
the company will reach the oil stratum at a 
depth of about 1200 feet. 

Taking this opportunity to answer the 
many innuiries as to the possibilities of this 
district I will say that from my experience 
in the oil fields of California and the West 
I consider that it offers an exec. lent field for 
the prospector and investor, as the territory 
has had no boom and promising lands can 
be procured at very reasonable prices. 

The indications of extensive mineral de- 
posits along the line of serpentine jhills at 
the northern part of the township dre very 
promising. Fine prospects of cinnabar are 
being developed and great ledges of the ore 
outcrop along the north edge of township 
19-13 and the south edge of 18-13, being, in 
all probability, the same formation on which 
the New Idra mine was developed a few 
miles to the northwest. I saw a fine asbestos 
prospect and from the general character of 
the rock in many places I believe that ex- 
tensive mines of this material might be opened 
up to good advantage. There are also large 
deposits of gypsum, magnesia, Fullers' earth 
and phosphates. The ore from these various 
prospects could be readily conveyed by tram- 




Range of Serpentine Hills, Rich in Cinnabar, 
Earth. The Draw to the left is the one in 



Asbestos, Gypsum, Magnesia and Fuller's 
which I saw a fine Asbestos Prospect. 



cry, every acre of promising light oil terri- 
tory is going to be in demand in the near 
future and great fortunes amassed by the 
holders of such lands. 

The one corporation now operating in the 
district is the Michigan Oil and Develop- 
ment Co. of Grand Rapids. Mich., to whose 
field manager. Mr. H. R. Crozier, I am great- 



ways to an excellent mill site on Section 9, 
19. 13, where there are perpetual springs of 
good water. With the development ■ of oil 
in the district great possibilities for the 
nomic mining of these extensve ore bodies 
are offered. 

I visited the cinnabar mine recently 
opened up by one Boyle and others located 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



on the northeast corner of Section 3, 19, 13, 
I examined the ore exposed in the several 
workings and consider it very rich in quick- 
silver, the same being very promising. From 
my observations I consider that this cinna- 
bar ledge extends across Sections 3, 4, 5 and 
7 ; also along the adjoining part of township 
18-13. From surface indications I have no 



Sections 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, II, 12, 13, 
14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, of Town- 
ship 19, Range 13. 

Second. That the oil will be of a similar 
quality as that produced at Oil City. The 
hundreds of seepages which are in evidence 
at every point where the stratum has been 
broken bears evidence of this fact. 




Looking Down the White Creek Valley. Rig of the Michigan Oil & Development 
Co. in the Foreground. (See Pages 4 and S.) 



doubt that a rich mine could be developed as 
the surface showings are equally as good as 
those found at the New Idra mine to the 
west. The ledges are so situated that a lim- 
ited amount of capital only should be re- 
quired to develop a series of mines of great 
richness along the entire outcrop. 

From my observations during a thorough 
examination of the White Creek district I 
derived the following conclusions: 

~First. That petroleum should be encoun- 
tered in drilling over a greater portion of 



Third. That extensive and valuable min- 
eral deposits will be opened up on the range 
of serpentine hills above referred to. 

Fourth. That the district is easily ac- 
cessible to vehicles, pipe lines or railroad. 
Thousands of dollars have evidently been 
expended on the roadways by the Michigan 
Oil & Development Company to facilitate 
the development of its promising territory, 
so that nearly every point of the field may 
be reached by light or heavy vehicles. 



News from the Field 



COALINGA. 



Coalinga, Cal., Jan. 24, 1905. — Coalinga 
Peerless Oil Co. has two wells drilling. Its 
production is being increased rapidly. 

The Oil City Petroleum Company has 
just issued its annual report to its stock- 
holders, the report also including a recapitu- 
lation of the business transacted since the 
organization of the company, April 15, 1899. 
The total receipts for the year including 
$2,176.89 on January 1, amount to $91,184.12, 
and the disbursements, which include eleven 
dividends ($35,000.00), amount to $90,179.27, 
leaving a balance on hand at the commence- 
ment of 1906 of $1,104.85. The estimated 
valuation of the company's equipment is 
$27,784.00. It has ten producing wells and 
is making regular deliveries of oil to the 
Standard Oil Company. The recapitulation 



for the past five years shows that $80,000.00 
has been paid out in twenty-seven dividends 
from the sale of oil. The total amount of 
oil sold is 842,907.86 barrels, for which a 
sum of $217,251.76 was received. The high- 
est average price per year was in 1900, when 
it was $1, and the lowest in 1904, when it 
reached the low-water mark of .2207c. The 
Oil City Petroleum Company is one of our 
sound oil corporations that is not ashamed 
to give a detailed account of money re- 
ceived and expended. The fact that only 
$6,667.00 has been paid out in officers' and 
directors' fees since the incorporation of the 
company speaks for itself. The expense ac- 
count of $9,437.91 for six and two-thirds 
years is unprecedented. The company has 
an excellent piece of property which should 
show a fine production for many years to 
come. 



The California and New York Oil Co. has 
its No. 3 well 900 feet deep, with 10-incb, 
and is putting in an eight-inch pipe line, 
with which it will shut off the water. The 
formation has a most inverting pitch and 
looks better than the big well, No. 1. 

California Monarch well No. I came in 
again Thursday morning, January 17. They 
have her under perfect control. The oil and 
gas is flowing through two four-inch lead 
lines, which convey the oil to the tanks. 
There is a 20-foot cushion for the force of 
the gas to strike, which assures them suc- 
cess. Their No. 4 well has improved con- 
siderably lately. It was finished with eight- 
inch drive pipe. 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria, Cal., Jan. 24. — The same 
conditions prevail in the field as previously 
reported, except that another gusher came in 
that threatened for a day or two to waste 
lots of oil. 

The Brookshire Oil Co., after having their 
tools stuck for two months, decided to drill 
past them. They were in oil, but as a tall 
column of water 2800 feet long held the oil 
down they did not know how much they 
had below the casing. In boring a very few 
feet deeper the water column began to seep 
away from below the casing. The pressure 
removed from on top, the gas pressure be- 
low suddenly burst forth and spouted the oil 
above the derrick. Within 36 hours, how- 
ever, the well was capped and further waste 
was avoided. 

Graciosa Oil Co. is drilling its No. 6 well 
and is down 2000 feet, in good formation. 
This well is about one-half mile south of the 
Newlove line and close to the Careaga ranch 
line. The company has five excellent pro- 
ducing wells and when it has finished drill- 
ing a certain number more will run a sepa- 
rate pipe line to some shipping point on 
San Luis bay or this side of it, and there 
refine the oil and distribute the distilled 
article. 

The deliveries of oil from the field have 
recently been slacker, owing to lack of tank- 
age storage of the Pacific Coast Oil Co. 
and the stormy ocean at Port Harford pre- 
venting landing — the extended wharf not 
being completed yet. Ground is broken for 
putting up four more large storage oil tanks 
near Orcutt. 

Since the week of rain the prosy looking 
oil fields have a beautiful green background. 
Our fields here are not like the barren Kern 
County west hills ; trees and grass grow 
close to the derricks. 

The Radium Oil Co. is drawing off the 
water from its well to test what oil it has so 
far in the deep well. 

In the East field decided progress has 
been made in the Palmer oil well since Jan- 
uary 1. At that date E. E. Henderson had 
hardly reached the 1000-foot level. Sticky 
formation and water caused very slow work 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ir that point. When the water was 
shut off and real -hale formation entered 
a run of over 400 feet has since been 
made. The formation at the [400-foot 

ry similar to that of the proven '>il 
lirlils. It is expected, however, that nil will 
be found at a deeper depth in this field. 

The Pennsylvania < >il Co. is happier since 
it caught onto its bit and has control of the 
reins. The company is now going ahead, 
nearing the oil latitudes. 

The Pinal and Western Union companies 
arc paying the usual monthly dividends and 
have no oil news fo rthe once. 

Arroyo Grande. 

By request I have been asked to give a 
few notes from the Arroyo Grande field. 
Though it is not in our province to give 
news from another district, still consider- 
able interest hereabouts even is taken in the 
new oil fields of our northerly neighbors and 
we can briefly give the up-to-date status of 
the field. 

Four rigs in four different locations are 
drilling in this field, ranging from two to six 
miles from Arroyo Grande town. In addi- 
tion the Logan ( >il Co. is just putting up 
the fifth derrick. 

The Tiber Oil Co. has the initial well in 
this field, about six miles northwest of Ar- 
royo, in what is known as Price's Canyon. 
This is one of the McClurg leases. This 
well is 2800 feet and is the only one in oil. 
The oil is heavy, what gravity has not yet 
been given out. but ali this field so far shows 
the heavy oil type. If not too heavy it will 
he desirable fuel oil, but that is yet a matter 
of going down deeper, as we learn. Prob- 
ahlv in a month or two more may be known 
of this well. 

The McClurg lease is drilling in another 
place called the Perpetual. This well is not 
yet deep enough to be in oil sands. 

Two other test wells are going down, the 
O&k Park and the .Associated well, near 
Arroyi 1. 

This field is yet too recent in its develop- 
ment to know of results. L. E. B. 



SOUTHERN FIELDS. 



Los Angeles, January 24. — The Amalga- 
mated continues to drill wells at a rate that 
indicates its desire to keep up and increase 
its production, if possible, to fa II an expected 
increase in demand. From ten to twelve 
strings of tools continue to run almost con- 
tinuously upon the Salt Lake and Arturus 
properties. The demand is being fully sup- 
plied in the city and surrounding country 
but it is certain that the output is not in- 
creasing with the additional drilling. In fact 
it is not as large today as it was three 
months ago. Six thousand barrels a day is 
without doubt the maximum. With the Gil- 
more, Schumacher (now Pacific Light and 
Tower Company) and Los Angeles Pacific 



Railroad wells 8000 barrel- max be set down 

as the output. 

In tin- Whittier field there is little drilling 
in progress. The Central has one well in 

course of drilling and some other- that are 
not quite complete, but being '.eit for a 
time. The Fidelity is -till drilling on one. 
With the beginning of the year a number 

of contract- are being lei for Fuel, but owing 
to the number of three-year contracts made 
by the Amalgamated a year ago the number 
is smaller than would otherwise be the case. 
The Pacific Light and Tower Company, 
that bought the well- of Percy Schumacher 

some months since, near the Amalgamated 

property, for years purchased its fuel from 
the Standard, but will now use its own prod- 
uct. 

All over the city there is a continual com- 
plaint from business men and householders 
of the wretched quality of gas furnished by 
the Los Angeles Gas Company. That the 
complaint is just admits of absolutely no 
doubt. It is very nearly the limit, so to 
speak. Filled with sulphur fumes, it chokes 
the people and burns with a sickly flame. 
Day by day there are intimation., abroad 
that the cause of all this is the presence of 
sulphur in the oil which is being taken un- 
der a three years' contract. That the oil 
does contain a fair percentage of sulphur is 
undeniable. So far there appears to have 
been absolutely no effort made to purify it, 



either by the ga- company or by the Amal- 
gamated. The former ha- exchanged a large 
amount of its purchased oil for \\ hittier 
product and distillates from local refineries 
in order to get a better ga- maker, and is 

even seeking some waj supply of 

the Whittier oil, despite its contract with 
the Amalgamated. The latter i- even re- 
orti d to have been making some efforts to 
get some of this for supplying the gas com- 
pany. With the competition of the Amal- 
gamated refinery perhaps there wid be some 
relief for the long-suffering consumers of 
gas. if it he true thai the oil is the cause of 
the present poor quality of the City's il- 
luminant. 

Hack of all this there is an interesting- 
story going the rounds that probably has 
some foundation in fact, though perhaps ex- 
aggerated. It is that when the gas com- 
pany made this contract it did so in the fulf 
belief that it was Kern River oil that was 
to be supplied. This, however, was not 
specified in the contract and as the price 
was less than the cost of Kern oil and the 
freight it could never have been supplied 
unless a very substantial rebate was paid the 
Associated. It was signed a few weeks be- 
fore the Amalgamated deal was completed, 
and some Kern oil is said to have been de- 
livered on it which, of course, could be very 
readily done regardless of cost, in view of 
the later profits. The gas company is said 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stand ng price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The firit allotment is going and will sran be gone, when a second installment 
.will be offered at $15.00, to be followed bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



to have protested at first against the Salt 
Lake oil, but had to give in. 

The option given some months ago on the 
property of the Central Oil Company at 
Whittier will expire on February I. While 
nothing official is given out as the status of 
the deal, there is a general impression 
abroad, based upon what has leaked out, 
that it is not very likely to go through. The 
holders of the option are said to be a syndi- 
cate new in the oil business, although some 
of its individual members have interests in 
other companies. Their names have been 
carefully concealed. 

The discovery of deposits of heavy as- 
phaltum in the Waterman mountains of 
San Bernardino county, north of Kramer 
and east of Randsburg, has led to a rush of 
prospectors to file oil claims in that vicin- 
itv. Some 3000 acres have been taken up. 
Large sums have been wasted in by-gone 
years in efforts to get oil on the desert 
around Kramer and Hiawtha. 

The Union Oil Company's stockholders 
held their annual meeting in this city last 
Thursday. The annual report of the auditor 
showed gross earnings for the year of $2,- 
624,980.70, total expenses $1,623,583.59, net 
earnings $1,001,397.11, or 15.8 per cent of 
the total outstanding stock, of which $392,- 
556.60 was paid out in dividends, leaving a 
surplus of $608,840.51. The increase in the 
sales of oil over 1904 was 49 per cent. The 
directors elected were Lyman Stewart, W. 
L. Stewart, J. S. Torrance, J. H. Adams, F. 
C. Bolt. W. R. Staats John Baker, Jr., W. F. 
Botsford. Frank Garbutt, Edwin T. Earl and 
Giles Kellogg. 

The significance of the above increase in 
the sales is made more pronounced when it 
is remembered that during the year just 
past the Associated made its break into the 
Los Angeles field, where the Union had for- 
merly practical control and captured con- 
siderable of the latter's local trade. From 
this it is seen that the Union has made up 
in new markets not only all that was lost, 
a mere drop in the bucket compared with its 
total business, but has increased the whole 
by nearly a half, much of which is new con- 
sumption. The Associated has also cap- 
tured much in the new fields, so that the 
big increase in the use of California oil be- 
comes more apparent. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



The Union Oil Co.'s tank steamer Argyll 
was cleared January 23 for Honolulu, via 
Port Harford, with 25,000 barrels of crude 
oil, valued at $35,000, as its cargo. _ The 
steamer also carried 1760 gallons distillate, 
valued at $176. 

The Standard Oil Co.'s tank steamer Ap- 
palachee was cleared January 20th for 
Shanghai and Canton with 1,383,977 gallons 
of Refined Oil, valued at $44,979. 

The steamer also carried 10 cases and 50 
gallons of distillate, valued at $11. 

It is said that there is a possibility of the 
natural gas from the Fearless Oil Co.'s well 
near McKittrick being piped to Bakersfield 
for city use. 

Fred T. Sherman was arrested in Seattle 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 




Works : Cor. New Main and Date streets. 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal, 



W: WALLACE B. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARLBSWORTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, W% A W% Agent of 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, wr ni K Roofing 
Toilets, Pumps, Water I \*U PAINTS 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 




CAR TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



FOR Al_l_ USES 



We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

fl nd can mount on wood or steel underframes. 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 
of all sizes up to and including 

55.000 BARRELS 



Oil Refineries Complete Our Specialty 



WARREN OITY BOILER WORKS 

OFFICE AND WORK S:— W A R R E N , OHIO 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



EQUITY EQUALITY 

COOPERATION 

IS THE MOTTO OF THE 

Goldfrog Big C Mining Company 



GOLDFROG BIG C MINING COMPANY 
Incorporated under the non-assessable laws of Arizona ; 
capitalization $1,000,000: par value $1. EVERY SHARE 
TREASURY STOCK. NO FREE STOCK ISSUED TO 
ANYONE FOR ANY PURPOSE. 

This company was organized by one hundred people who 
put up the money to buy the property, which is'paid for in 
full, and then $2000 was placed in the treasury to start the 
work. The GOLDFROG BIG C was organized on a basis 
whereby each and every stockholder, shares equally and 
equitably in proportion to the amount of money invested. 

COMPARISON. 
Compare this fair and equitable plan with the average 
company, whose promoters take from 50 to 70 per cent of the 
stock anil then ask you to buy treasury stock to help develop 
the property, or possibly pay for it. The plan of the GOLD- 
FROG PjIG C is wholly different. Each stockholder stands in 
exactly the same position as his neighbor. He receives stock 
in proportion to his money invested. There are no debts of 
any kind or nature and the money paid for stock goes to de- 
velop the property. It is CLEAN, SAFE and FIRST-CLASS 
and such a fair deal will surely prove a success. 

PROPERTY. 

The company owns four claims in the ridge of hills at 
Goldfield, north of the Diamondfield-Black Butte Consolidated, 
and other producing, valuable properties. Big ledges outcrop 
on the property showing fair surface values. The shaft at 40 
feet is passing through a yellow porphyry and the bottom of 
the shaft is now close to the ledge, as the formation is showing 
a great deal of quartz. This alone would make a mine, but the 
company owns in addition two claims at Bullfrog at the foot 
of Bonanza Mountain on the west, and also owns by its Tun- 
nel Site Location, lying next to the Bullfrog Extension and 
the Original Bullfrog mines on Original Mountain, at Bull- 
frog, over 160 acres of highly mineralized land. This prop- 
erty is being rapidly developed by tunnel, which has reached a 
depth of 220 feet. An eight-foot talc ledge has been cut that 
shows fair values. The company is now drifting on this ledgs 
ami they are sure to strike high values in a short time, when 
this stock will undoubtedly advance to many times its present 
price. 

These three properties are paid for in full and are with- 
out debt of any kind. A buyer of stock shares in all profits 
that may come. from the development of all of these three 
properties. 



WHY SELLING STOCK? 

To sink the shafts deeper, to drive the tunnel farther, to 
drift nn the ledges, to buy machinery, supplies and materials 
and put the company on a producing basis as soon as possible. 
Every dollar invested in the stock helps develop the property. 
We are authorized to sell only 50,000 shares at 6 cents cash. 
The next block will be at a much higher price. We don't be- 
lieve there is a bigger or better proposition that is selling- 
stock at such a low price in a company that owns such well 
located mines as does the GOLDFROG BIG C. 

WHO ARE THE PROMOTERS? 

That is a question asked by people who know how to in- 
vest. If the promoters are all right they are safe in making 
an investment. The promoters of this company are 100 people 
who put up their money to buy the property and put cash in 
the treasury to start the work. These too people are stock- 
holders and are the executive committee of the GOLDFROG 
BIG C, and includes the officers and directors of the company 
and ourselves. 

NO LONGER A PROSPECT. 

We feel justified in now offering this stock to the public, 
as we believe it is already out of the speculative period and 
that it is a safe buy and one that will prove immensely profit- 
able. The share holder of this company shares in all the profits 
that may be developed on this big mining property ; work is 
constantly going forward ; values as high as $33 have already 
been encountered; it is managed by business and mining men 
who have the highest banking references ; the executive com- 
mittee of 100 people is behind this proposition. 

We believe it is the best buy of the district at 6 cents per 
share. We have only 50,000 shares to sell at that price. It will 
go quickly and we believe that this stock, like many another 
first-class stock of Tonopah, Goldfield and Bullfrog that has 
advanced from one hundred to several hundred per cent dur- 
ing the last year, will be selling this time next year at many 
times its present price. 

This advertisement will not appear again. On a special 
offer of this kind on a first-class stock, where only a smali 
amount is offered for sale, it is always a wise things to do to 
wire your order if you possibly can. Make your reservation by 
wire and immediately follow with a letter with remittance. If 
your letter with remittance should arrive after the stock is all 
sold your money will promptly be returned without cost to 
you. 

Use the Wires. It Pays. 



Debenture Surety Company 



A10, Rialto Building, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



last Saturday charged with having given 
George T. Wright, mayor of Tacoma, a 
bribe of $6000. Sherman has been employed 
by both the Barber and Independent asphalt 
companies, and the bribery is alleged to have 
occurred during the issuance of extensive 
paving contracts in Tacoma recently. 

A citizens' committee investigated, and 
Sherman was their informant. The commit- 
tee caused a Grand Jury to be called, but re- 
fused to present its evidence, when the 
County Attorney declined to promise im- 
munity to witnesses. On Sherman's own 
statement he is to be prosecuted. Mayor 
Wright denies having received the money. 

Sherman was taken to Tacoma and held 
under a $5000 bond. 

Portland people are being urged to estab- 
lish an independent oil refinery in competi- 
tion with Standard Oil Company.- 

Asphaltum deposits have been discovered 
on the north side of Waterman mountain, 
thirty-five miles northeast of Kramer, San 
Bernardino county, and as a result 3000 
acres of land on the west and 200 acres on 
the north have been taken up. If there is 
oil discovered there it will be the first ever 
found in this section. 

Associated Oil Company has declared 
dividend No. 3 of 1% cents per share on the 
capital stock of the company, amounting to 
$600,000, payable February 1, 1906. The 
books will not close and stockholders must 
send in written authorization before divi- 
dends will be paid. 

The following oil companies paid divi- 
dends on Saturady last, January 20: Oil City 
Petroleum, 1 cent, $5000 ; Twenty-eight, 10 
cents $6000 : Home, 2 cents, $2000 ; Union, 
50 cents, $50,000; United Petroleum, 80 
cents, $11,744. 

Amos Clark of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, recently 
exhibited a sample of oil taken from a 250- 
barrel gusher recently struck in Knox coun- 
ty, not far from Butler. When the well was 
drilled in no tanks were prepared for the 
oil and a reservoir was built to hold it. The 
product is of such clarity that it is possible 
to see the bottom of the reservoir, though 
the oil is six feet deep. It brings 22 cents 
per barrel more than any other oil produced 
in the country. 



Our best information leads us to believe 
that the Standard Oil Company is making 
every inducement to the producers of light 
oil on this coast to increase their product, 
for which a very fair price is being paid in 
many instances. The producers of Santa 
Maria are extremely warry against produc- 
ing a surplus of their light gravity oil and 
will not enter into a contract that is likely 
to build up such a surplus or have a depres- 
sing effect on the market. At Coalinga some 
of the lightest oil is bringing a price close to 
the $1 mark and the companies producing it 
are encouraged to exert their best efforts to 
increase the amount received. The Standard 
Oil Company has great need of all the light 
oil it can procure — and is glad to pay a 
round price for it — as its greatly increasing 
domestic and Oriental trade calls for im- 
mense quantities of illuminants. Contrary 
to the belief of those unacquainted with the 
facts of the case, practically all the illumi- 
nants used on this coast and the Orient are 
manufactured from California oil. It is, 
therefore, only natural that the manufactur- 
ers should seek out, at fair prices, the best 
oil produced in the State. 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayersand Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



DO YOU OWN DEAD MINING STOCK? 



If you have any dead ones, write us the 
name of the company and how many shares 
you have and how much cash you paid for 
them. Then we will show you how to save 
your money. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

A 10 Rialto Building, 

San Francisco - - - California 



J. S. EWBN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code'* 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 16SS 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S, COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX 237 -. 




I WANTED 



W. E. YOULE 



I Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

I OH Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel'* joints guaranteed not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., 
Chicago. Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 






FULLY PA ID UP 



SEARCHERS OP RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAt 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



n 



Private loom 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317-319-321-323 

Pi« St,. S. F. 



Open Evenings 
Nnsic Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



WHEELER & WILSON MT1 GO. 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



Coalinga 



California 



SBVBNTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH S BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co I'ive (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



17 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



'-•fiSBte 




Branches: 



PORTLAND 



Los Angelbs 



SEATTLE 




Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

are perfect in every respect. The sportsman is never 
.iivi|.| minted in the working of his gun if it's a STEV- 
ENS — they are safe, strong, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

Wewill send vou our valuable 140-page book, tell- 
ing all about STEVENS amis, shooting, hunting, 
notes on the proper care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FREE PVZZLE1 Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, on receipt of catalog price. 

J. STEVENS ASMS AND TOOL CO., 

P. O. Box 4093. 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS.. U.S.A. 



The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for the pro. 
motion of any legitimate ptoposi. 
tlon, Mining, Manufacturing, IrH- 
gatlon, Mercantile, Pateits cr 
Railroads, we can assist yon. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 

Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



Paul W. Prutzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



TeL Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACB & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 418, 420, 422, 424, 426 
Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

We carry the l*arge» Stock. Oar price* ere 
Eqai bible. 

r«l. Main. 1188. 



PATENT S — Unlted States an d 

■ Foreign. Trade 

Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building, 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



The Star Drilling Machine 



mounted upon trucks separate. 



Cut shows boiler mounted upon tram* The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler erating for oil or gas. I 

of machine for oil and gas works. It . . . 

Its tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 
it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory. 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. They 
are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the road. 
Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling an d Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

flarron, Rickard & McCooe, California Agents, San Francisco 




12 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Cable address 



' ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



CALIFORNIA ASPHALTUM 
SALES AGENCY 



MALTHA 



THE 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL OFFICES 

MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZZ=I ~ CHICAGO OFFICE 

WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 

When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magazine describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
It is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NOSCAI.F EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND . 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 
Phone James 7116 San Francisco, Cal. 

SMITH, EMERY & CO, 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 



Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases Salts; Clay 







Tank Caps and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

S-AJV FRANCISCO 




\£0f?.'; 




Vol. 7, No. 14- San Francisco, Cal., February 3, 1906. 



Price lO Cents. 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED 1857. 



L'ESCHEN'S 

DRILLING CABLES, 
SAN DUNES, CASING 
^'TUBING LINES. 



A.LESCHEN &S0NS ROPECO. 

920-932 N. FIRST ST. 
ST.LOUIS,MO. 

BRANCH OFFICES; 
NEW YORK CHICAGO 







WE ARE AGENTS FOR 

L ESC HEN LINES... R. H. HER RON COMPANY 



AND CARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 



•AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



L08 ANGELB8, CAL. 



JOSEPH REID GAS ENGINE CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



REID TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE 



.©; 



The only reverse gear 
gas engine made that 
has been successfully 
used for drilling, clean' 
ing out, pumping, pulU 




ing tubing and rods, in 
fact any work that 
the regular oil country 
steam engine is used 
for 



For Prices and Particulars Jipply to 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 



Pacific Coast Agent 



Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, February 3, 1906 



Number 14 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' 
Association. 



Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 

Office and Editorial Rooms 
318 Pine Street San Francisco, California 
Telephone Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 • 5° 

Three Months 1 -oo 

Single Copies 10 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Advertising Rates on Request. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, 
Draft, or Registered Letter, addressed to 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San 
Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Communications 
must be accompanied by writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, 
California, as second-class matter. 

AN UNSAVORY PUBLICATION. 
There is not a publication in the United 
States that is more openly antagonistic to 
the legitimate mining and oil interests on 
the Pacific Coast than the Denver Mining 
Record. This yellow literature, hot air, un- 
complimentary sheet has incurred the wrath 
and disgust of practically every legitimate 
mining and oil corporation west of the 
Sierras. Perhaps the Record should not be 
too much blamed for the simple carrying 
of an advertisement of a fake corporation,' 
but when any journal will carry such an ad- 
vertisement and then indorse the enterprise, 
such a journal should be declared fraudulent 
and kept out of the mails. Then when such 
a journal will publish, in connection with its 
advertisements, three-column, double scare- 
head stories of rich strikes and hundred 
thousand dollar assays, that exist only in 
the minds of their authors; just then it 
should be ignored by the mining world and 
left to die the lingering death that invariably 
comes to such unsavory publications. From 
a careful perusal of the columns of the Rec- 
ord we cannot find that it has the adver- 
tisements of any corporations on this coast 
except a few that are evidently too weak to 
resist its alleged blackmailing methods of 
gaining its advertisements. From our per- 
sonal knowledge the Record has persisently 
published defamatory and untruthful arti- 



cles attacking some of our most enterprising 
California corporations. There is not a 
State in the Union that offers the excellent 
irtunities for investment and develop- 
ment that California does, yet this unreliable 
publication above referred to would have 
the public believe that an indorsement of 
the Record is necessary to insure merit. 
The legitimate mining companies of the 
Pacific Coast will not advertise in the Rec- 
ord because they consider it a blackmailing 
sheet. Its methods in California have been 
such that it has gained the contempt of the 
legitimate mining world. 



THE EUROPEAN MALADY. 

A new and peculiar malady has recently 
broken out among the citizens of this coun- 
try who are actively engaged in "high 
finance" and front its rapid spread and the 
fact that it is apparently incurable in this 
country, great fears are maintained that it 
may attack many men of present high stand- 
ing. 

One of the most peculiar features of the 
European malady is that "oil men" are par- 
ticularly susceptible to its ravages. No cure 
has yet been discovered for it. Temporary 
relief is obtained only while the patient re- 
mains in Europe. The symptoms are pe- 
culiar. The patient is usually attacked 
while actively engaged in manipulating the 
affairs of some oil corporation. A worried 
look, accompanied by uneasy, evasive eyes, 
is at first noticed. This is shortly followed 
by ague, chills, occasionally high fever, and 
a tendency to quietude and retirement. Pa- 
tient often can not be found for several 
days or weeks. An irresistible desire to 
travel soon follows, and if patient is not 
taken into custody, soon departs for Eu- 
rope. Patient then becomes more restful 
and desire to travel ceases. Chills and fever 
entirely disappear, but patient develops a 



haunted look and becomes uneasy at the 
mention of certain words such as "Garfield," 
"America," "Hadley," etc. Death rarely 
followers as a result of the malady. 

Nearly all the oil-producing States have 
lost many of their most brilliant oil men by 
the European fever, California not excepted. 
One of the latest cases of the malady is 
said to be no other than the well-known 
John D. Rockefeller. Mr. Rockefeller has 
shown violent symptoms for some time past. 
Has shown a great tendency to retirement 
and has acted mysteriously. A press dis- 
patch from New York says : 

"Mystery has surrounded Rockefeller's 
recent movements. Four or five weeks prior 
to January I he left New York, ostensibly 
for Summerville, N: C, or Hot Springs, Va. 
He was at Hot Springs last month, but 
since that time little or nothing has been 
known of his movements. 

"When Dr. William R. Harper, president 
of the University of Chicago, died three 
weeks ago it was expected that Rockefeller 
would go to Chicago to attend the funeral, 
but he did not. He sent messages of con- 
dolence, conveyed through his son, John D. 
Rockefeller, Jr., and no inkling was given 
as to his whereabouts. 

"The people on Rockefeller's estate at 
Lakewood and at his Cleveland home are 
completely in the dark as to his movements. 
It had been generally assumed that Rocke- 
feller's prolonged absence was entirely due 
to the Missouri subpoenas. 

"It was said in Lakewood that Rockefeller 
had told an intimate friend late in Decem- 
ber that he had been planning to sail for 
France on January 6. It would be hard for 
him to take passage on a steamship in New 
York and escape observation, but the theory 
is advanced that he may have sailed from 
Philadelphia or Boston and thus got away 
without being noticed. It is feared that 
Rockefeller may permanently take up his 
residence in Europe." 

Many other prominent oil men in the 
country are said to be showing violent symp- 
toms of the European malady, and a gen- 
eral exodus of the fraternity is expected. 



COMMITTEE HEADQUARTERS. 

OIL PRODUCERS' ASSOCIATION, 

11 Montgomery St., Space S. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL., February 1. 1906. 
TO THE OIL PRODUCERS OF CALIFORNIA— 

There will be a meeting of Oil Producers of California held in this city at Assembly Hall, Mills 
Building, on Wednesday, February 7, 1906. at 7:30 P. M. 

It has, no doubt, come to your notice that the consumption of California oil is on the increase, 
and will be further augmented by the new railroads coming into this State, the pipe-line to be built 
across the Isthmus of Panama, the largely increased foreign demand and the increased domestic 
consumption throughout all of the Pacific States. 

It is a fact that the production of the old oil fields of California is on the decline and develop- 
ment work suspended (attributable to the low price of oil). 

The object of this meeting is to devise ways and means to better the present deplorable condi- 
tion of the Oil Producers and bring together the Oil Producers of the different fields of this State, 
as by so doing we will act more intelligently, united, than we will apart. 

From the tone of the meeting held by a great number of the producers, it would seem that they 
are ready and willing to do anything to change the present condition of affairs. 

Tour presence is earnestly requested, for questions of ■vital importance to you will come up 
before this meeting. Tours respectfully. 

(Signed) S. W. MORSHEAD. (Signed) JOHN HINKEL. 

(Signed) H. U. MAXFTELD, (Signed) G. A. SCOTT. 

(Signed) THOS. R. TURNER, - (Signed) ROBT. HATS SMITH. 

Committee Oil Producers' Association. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



To Construct Great 
Refinery 



A meeting of the California Petroleum 
Refineries, Limited, was held in the Hobart 
building, this city, last Monday, at which 
it was decided to construct a refinery of large 
capacity on San Luis Bay, near Avila, about 
two miles from Port Harford. The action 
was taken after several months of delibera- 
tion as to the most desirable site for the 
enterprise. The selection was finally made 
on account of its being the nearest desirable 
location to the Santa Maria oil .fields, in 
which the property of the Graciosa Oil Com- 
pany, a subsidiary corporation, are located. 
The selected site is only forty miles from 
the oil wells, from which the oil can be piped 
by gravitation at an insignificant cost. This 
will give the corporation excellent facilities 



Been received at the above price the Stan- 
dard Oil Company announced a cut in price. 
Instead of accepting the insignificant price 
offered, as has been done in many instances 
in the State, the Graciosa Oil Company in- 
formed the big Rockefeller trust that it 
would not sell its product for a lesser price ; 
in fact, that it thought that an advance was 
more in line with the value of the oil and 
the general conditions surrounding the in- 
dustry in the State. Of course, the monop- 
oly would not yield — neither would the Gra- 
ciosa Oil Company — which at once com- 
menced negotiations with foreign connec- 
tions with a view of bettering its conditions. 
The California Petroleum Refineries, Lim- 
ited, was the result. 

The actual work of construction on the 
big refinery will commence in the very near 




Property of La Graciosa Oil Company, Santa Maria. The Product of this Property Will Be Used in 
the Great Port Harford Refinery of the California Petroleum Refineries, Limited. 



for water transportaton for the product of 
its refineries and wells. The ratification of 
the above action has been made by the main 
office in London, England, cablegrams hav- 
ing been received here during the week to 
that effect. 

The organization of the California Petro- 
leum Refineries, Limited, is the outcome of 
apparent oppression on the part of the 
Rockefeller monopolies. At the time the 
Graciosa Oil Company completed its first 
well, nearly two years ago, the product read- 
ily brought 75 cents per barrel, which, al- 
though it was only a part of its true value, 
allowed the corporation to live and make a 
small profit. After about 100,000 barrels had 



future. Its initial capacity will be from 
5,000 to 8,000 barrels daily, which will be 
gradually enlarged to suit the growing busi- 
ness of the company. The present output 
of the Graciosa wells is over 1,500 barrels 
daily, and this production could be mate- 
rially increased in a short time if occasion 
requires. The company has almost unlim- 
ited territory to drill, which, even under very 
ordinary conditions, would supply the re- 
finery for many years. Its product is of the 
best to be found in the State of California 
and is particularly suited for refining pur- 
poses. It runs very high in the lighter 
products and makes one of the very best 
illuminating oils to be found on the market, 



comparing, it is said, to the very highest 
grades of illuminating oils placed on the 
market by the Standard Oil Company. 

The refined product of the refinery of 
the California Petroleum Refineries, Ltd., 
will be shipped by water from Port Har- 
ford. As great quantities of the crude prod- 
uct are already being loaded at this point by 
the Union Oil Company of California, and 
the Standard Oil Company, it will soon be- 
come one of the greatest oil shipping ports 
in the United States if not in the world. A 
bill has has recently been introduced into 
Congress to have Port Harford made a port 
of entry. This would afford the shippers 
with ready clearances which now have to be 
made from Port San Francisco. As much 
of the oil from Port Harford is shipped to 
British Columbia, South America and the 
Orient, the necessity of its being declared a 
port of entry is obvious. 

There is plenty of room in the refining 
business for a strong, well organized corpor- 
ation, haviing its own production, and the 
California Petroleum Refineries, Ltd., has 
all the necessary advantages to make it a 
very material factor in the future distribu- 
tion of California oil. 

The president of the California' Petroleum 
Refineries, Ltd., is Simon Symons of Lon- 
don. The directors are William H. Mc-Gar- 
vey, Charles Symons, Thomas Stoker and 
John Hay, all of London, and Isaac Liebes 
and Henry Crocker of San Francisco, Mau- 
rice Casey and Benjamin Liebes act with 
Isaac Liebes and Henry Crocker as local 
directors of the company. Louis A. Phil- 
lips is the general manager. 



Oil Fuel Popular in the 
North 



The following, recently published in the 
Seattle Daily Times will doubtless be of in- 
terest to California oil producers : 

Oil is now taking the place of coal as fuel 
on many of the Sound steamers. Workmen 
are now converting the Alaska Steamship 
Company's steamer Dolphin into an oil 
burner. The vessel is the first in the North- 
ern fleet to be changed. Permits to make 
the steamers Lydia Thompson and Rosalie 
oil burners have been received from Wash- 
ington. According to the laws the com- 
panies must send plans and specifications 
to the Department of Commerce and Labor. 
If it is decided to allow the change, notifica- 
tions are sent to Inspector Bermingham at 
San Francisco, who in turn sends notice to 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



the company through Inspectors Whitney 

an<l Turner in Seattle. 

The steamers Athlon anil Inland Flyer 
i if the Port • Orchard Route, are now suc- 
cessful oil burners. The steamer State of 
Washington is also burning oil and the 
Whatcom was converted into an oil burner 

several weeks ago. The Sound steamers 
Skagit Queen and Vashon are both oil burn- 
ers and when the city tire boat Snoqualamie 
is again in commission the fuel will be 

changed from coal to oil. Plans have also 
been prepared to convert the Taeoma pass- 
enger steamer Flyer into an oil burner. 

A number of steam schooners running 
along the Coast are now burning oil and the 
steamer Santa Barbara, recently overhauled 
on the drydock at San Francisco, was 



changed to an oil burner before leaving the 
ways. The large freighters in the tleet of 

the American-Hawaiian Steamship Com- 
pany are successful oil burners. 
< officers of local steamship companies sa) 

there is a saving of from \~ to ,^ per cent 
by burning oil. The force in the fireioom 
is reduced one-half and the carrying capacity 
of the vessels is increased, as oil does not 
take up half as much space as coal. It is a No 
asserted by Steamship men that vessels pre- 
sent a cleaner appearance when burning oil, 
as there is no coal smoke and soot to blow 
about the decks. 

Oil was introduced into the northern Pa- 
cific States by the Union ( n'1 Company of 
California, which now has an immense trade 
there. 




Stream of Oil Flowing Into Tanks From California Monarch No. 1, Coalinga District. 

Mews from the Field 



COALINGA. 



The Union Oil Co. well No. 6, which has 
been pumping, broke loose last week and is 
now flowing about iooo barrels. 

Coalinga-Pacific Oil Co. has its rig for 
No. 4 weil about completed, situated just 
east of its No. I. It contemplates drilling 
No. 4 very soon. ^- 

The M. K. & F/ Oil Co. fired up its west 
boiler Saturday. Looks as if it would soon 
commence drilling well No. 2. 

The California Oil Fields, Ltd., has built 
a very substantial fence around section 27, 
which more clearly defines property lines, 
establishes corners, though it has incon- 
venienced those who have been in the habit 
of going across this property at random. 
Ample openings are left for principal roads. 



The California and New York Oil Co. 
well No. 3 is 1 1 50 feet deep, formation, from 
big sulphur, is exactly as that passed 
through in No. 1. The indications as now 
shown, wiil bring the oil sand at about 1400 
feet. No. 1 is steadily producing her oil at 
no expense to the company, it being a flow- 
ing well. The company is paying regular 
monthly dividends. 

The California Monarch Oil Co. wells 
Nos. 11 and 12 are producing up in the 250 
barrel class. Wells Nos. 2, 3 and 4 are 
among the nicest producers in the district. 
A first class fuel oil and very free from 
foreign matter. The management is con- 
templating further improvement and devel- 
opment upon section 31-19-15. On section 
26 the drillers are putting in a string of 6- 
inch line pipe. The territory is deep but 



develops big producers ami a light gravitj 

oil. 

The Inca Oil Co. has its well No, 3 down 

600 feet with 10-inch pipe, and goii 

The Union Oil Co. has its new rig 
well No. 8 about completed. It has No. 7 
cleaned out and wll now have it on the 
pump. 

The Cypress Oil Co. (R. II. Herron Co.) 
is putting in 8-inch pipe in well No. 1. It 
expects to commence work on No. 2 the 
coming week. 

The Cory & Campbell lease (now S. 1'. 
R. R.) is putting in a 6-inch line to connect 
with the line to Oro Station, to ship the 
product of the two wells. There is about 
12,000 barrels of oil on hand. , 

The California Diamond Oil Co. has its 
well No. 4 (Ellis lease well No. 2) down 
about 1000 feet with 8-inch pipe, work going 
on satisfactorily: 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria, Gal., Feb. i. — The great 
gusher of the L T nion Oil Co. is breathing 
very slowly ; it may be breathing its last. 
But it will not give up the ghost at once. It 
is still fretfully and spasmodically belching 
forth gas and oil. A neighbor, its nearest 
neighbor, stabbed it a few days ago. This 
neighbor, Brookshire, they call him, claims 
it was an unintentional act and that no in- 
jury was aimed at its near neighbor. Indeed 
Brookshire has the equal right to draw its 
sustenance from generous mother earth. 

The so-called Hartnell gusher has as- 
sumed the vividness of a personality, hence 
our figurative allusions may be pardoned. 
This great gusher, which started out with a 
flow of 8000 barrels daily, and then after 
months kept up a full 3000 barrel flow, is 
about to stop flowing. The Brookshire 
company sunk a weil on its own territory 
close to it, about 400 or 500 feet distant, 
which recently gushed. It seems that in 
gushing it liberated part of the pent up 
gases, which took the direction of the Brook- 
shire well as a new vent and pushed up its 
oil, with a corresponding falling off of the 
Union's gusher, which now only puffs up 
gas occasionally and is rapidly giving out 
in its flow. 

But this mighty Behemoth among oil 
wells is not dead yet. If the pump were 
applied plenty of oil it would still yield. 
Why we call it the beast of the (oil) field 
is because of its beastiv record. It was born 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



about 14 months ago and it was so wild and 
terrible at first that every one predicted its 
speedy decline. Three immense earth- 
damned reservoirs were constructed first, 
and the oil kept pumped out as rapidly as 
possible. While no accurate measurement 
was kept of its production, it is close enough 
to figure from its minimum flow that it has 



THE SOUTHERN FIELDS. 



Los Angeles, CaL, February 1. — The de- 
sire to acquire oil rights on every piece of 
land that is suspected of petroleum-bearing 
qualities by the Associated-Amalgamated 
interests in this region, not already exploit- 
ed, is made manifest by the recent negotia- 



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ing that the only way to advance the price 
of oil is to stop new development. 

The Amalgamated continues to drill as 
actively as ever. The supply keeps up with 
the increasing demand and the company is 
continually seeking new contracts. No great 
gushers are being brought up at present, The 
wells, however, yield well on the pump. 

In Orange county, near Huntington 
Beach, there are good oil indications and 
a company known as the San Joaquin has 
been drilling there for some months. At 
present the work is down over 1000 feet 
with good signs, it is said, but with no fur- 
ther work in progress and none probable 
under the present owners. Some other lo- 
cal men are discussing the chances for suc- 
cess with a view to forming a company and 
prospecting the neighborhood. The com- 
pany already on the ground was formed by 
Southern California people, George E. Hun- 
tington of this city being president. J. E. 
Austin, formerly of Bakersfield, was pro- 
moter and acted as general manager. It is 
rumored that others may take over the prop- 
erty and work it. . A. R. H. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



Two of the Oil Wells of the Brookshire Oil Company, Santa Maria. 



yielded close to 2,000,000 barrels of oil, of 
which probably near to 1,500,000 barrels 
have been saved and shipped out. The grav- 
ity of the oil was close to 25 per cent, so 
that it flows very readily in a 6-inch pipe 
line. 

This well alone produced the large storage 
of oil reported the last of the year. The 
Union Oil Co. has several very fine flowing 
wells and can supply all its present require- 
ments from them, just as it needs them. 
And in the long run oversupplies in open air 
storage is not most desirable. This is the 
banner producing well in the State to our 
knowledge and has handsomely repaid the 
Union Oil Co. The large profits of the 
Union Oil Co. for the past year were due 
in part to their Santa Maria production; and 
this gusher was a large factor of it. 

The Union Oil Co. continues the drilling 
of ail its numerous wells, but oil is not taken 
from them unless it is wanted. As spoken 
of before, the Santa Maria oil producers do 
not intend to overstock the market by any 
large storage, producing only as demanded 
by the market. 

We accredit the Union Oil Co. for finding 
new and enlarging fields for their oil. In 
doing this for themselves alone they are 
benefitting other producers, for when oil is 
once introduced and used it is there to stay, 
with ever increasing demand. 

The Chambers of Commerce of San Luis 
Obispo and Santa Maria have persistently 
been pushing the claims of a port of entry 
for San Luis Bay or Port Harford. Repre- 
sentative S. C. Smith of this Congressional 
district and United States Senator Bard have 
courteously responded and they will un- 
doubtedly do all they can towards furthering 
the needs of this oil field as regards shipping 
facilities. L. E. B. 



tions to purchase a tract of over 100 acres 
lying just west of the Salt Lake properties 
and adjoining the Hammel-Denker ranch, 
the rights on the latter being held by the 



The London Stock Exchange has receved 
an application for a special settling day and 
official quotations from the California Petro- 
leum Refineries, Ltd., with 160,000 shares of 
£1 each. 

A dividend (No. 30) on the Hanford Oil 
Company, of $2 per share, amounting to 
$4,000, is now payable. The total amount 




Steady and Constant Stream of Oil Flowing 
Reservoirs, Sec. 12 



nto California & New York Oil Company's 
,20-14, Coalinga 



Amalgamated. The land is owned by a lo- 
cal oil man who refuses to sell at any price 
offered or to fix any sum acceptable. He has 
made no attempt to test the ground and 
says he will wait for more favorable condi- 
tions before either drilling for oil or selling 
for any other purpose. The Associated peo- 
ple say they are as anxious to keep others 
out as to exploit the land themselves, claim- 



paid in dividends by this company, includ- 
ing No. 30, is $86,000. 

Total dividends paid by oil companies 
listed on the California Stock and Oil Ex- 
change, for January, 1906, amount to $120,- 
082. 

Prices went as. low as 13 cents for oil at 
the wells at Humble, Texas, just before the 
fire occurred in July in which 2,120,493 bar- 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



[ oil went up in smoke. The field had 

attained its highest point in production in 
June, and the decline in output, coupled with 

the loss of such a large quantity of oil. 
1 the market to Strengthen. At the 
close of the year the credit balance was 38 
cents and the contract price 40 cents. 

Oil is now higher in Louisiana than it has 
ever been, according to I.. F. Benckensteine, 
and it will soon go higher. As there is a 
smaller production in all the fields, and as 
the last well brought in at Jennings pro- 
duced nothing but salt water, there is no im- 
mediate liklihood of an improvement in the 
situation. 

Within the past two weeks the market for 
Casey, 111., crude oil has been advanced 
twice, making the present quotations 76 
cents. An operator just returned from the 
field, having completed five producing wells, 
in speaking of the outlook was of the opinion 
that it was the coming development in the 
West. The wells are shallow and can be 
drilled at a little expense and the cost of 
operating is light, so that small producers 
yield a profit. 

The first shipment of Butler, Pa., crude oil 
was purchased by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany and was sent to the refinery at Whit- 
ing, Ind. This oil is pronounced to be su- 
perior to Tiona, the highest grade of Penn- 
sylvania oil, being 65 per cent pure. 

There is some talk of promoting a produ- 
cers' association in the Indian territories, to 
see if it isn't possible to get a rate made and 
based on the test of oil. There seems to be 
no reason why the present production 
should not be bought at prices governed by 
the actual worth of the crude product. Pro- 
ducers recall the fact that recently Ohio pro- 
ducers wanted an increase in price on their 
oil, and by making the request, and showing 
they were entitled to it, an increase of 20 
cents a barrel on certain grades was granted 
by the purchasing agency. 

In explanation of the low prices of fuel oil 
on the Pacific Coast, General Manager Mil- 
ler of the Pacific Coast Oil Company, and 
the highest official of the Standard in that 
region, says : "The cheapness not only of 
coal but also of wood is one of the big diffi- 
culties oil men are called to face in working 
up trade on the northern coast. Slab wood 
can be had at 50 cents to $1.50 a cord any- 
where and it makes excellent fuel in many 
lines. Coal is also very low. In Los Ange- 
les shavings constitute the principal, in fact, 
almost the only fuel used in competition 
with oil. They are the refuse of the saw- 
mills ; these establishments burn them ex- 
clusively and have so much that they give 
tbjem away to get rid of them. Thus it is 
easy to see that wood fuel holds its own 
when it can be used." Mr. Miller, being in 
full possession of the real facts in the case, 
ca,n be considered only in the light of a party 
who wilfully and maliciously misrepresents 
facts. The prevailing price of oil at the pres- 
ent time is not justified by conditions in any 
sense of the word. Oil fuel can successfully 
compete with slab wood at 50 cents per cord, 
provided the former is not sold at a greater 
cost than $1 per barrel. It is now selling 
for less than half that amount. Coal is not 



cheap. It is selling for $4 and $5 dollars 
per ton within 1 ■ « > miles of the collerics. 1 >il 
fuel at $1 per barrel i> equal to it from any 
viewpoint one can look at it, and i> now 
competiting successfully with it in British 
Columbia and the Northwest. Our article 
"Oil fuel Popular in the North" will give 

the reader an idea of the consumers' estima- 
tion of oil fuel. Mr. Miller represents the 
most notorious "bulldozing" corporation in 
the world, whose charter a bill has been in- 
troduced into the Senate of the State of New 
Jersey to annul, with every indication that 
it will be done. 



*r 



Texas Statistics. 



Southeast Texas production on January 15 
was 40.605 barrels, and the Jennings output 
on the same day was 24,090 barrels, making 
the yield of the Gulf Coast districts 64,695 



barrels and the Jennings field 44.604 barrels. 
Humble was just getting its start at that 

time. To-day production in th is at 

a lower level than it has been in eighteen 
months. 

Price- are no! advancing, but on the con- 
trary, are declining, and one of the principal 
reasons given for this turn in the market is 
the accumulation of heavy oil in earthern 
storage al Jennings and at Humble. At 
Jennings the stocks in open ground tanks 
amount to between 5,060,000 and 6,000,000 
barrels. At Humble the stocks in earthern 
storage are placed at 3.700,000 barrels, near- 
ly two-thirds of which is held by the J. M. 
(luffcy Petroleum Company. 

This accumulation of more than 9,000,000 
barrels of heavy oil undoubtuedly is one of 
the depressing factors in the price situation. 
The risk of carrying it in open reservoirs, 




The Loma Lease, Santa Maria. Property of the Union Oil Corrpany of California. 



barrels, aginst 65,273 barrels on December 
31. The Texas fields showed a decline of 
of 4,668 barrels in the two weeks, and the 
Jennings district gained 4,090 barrels. Hum- 
ble was responsible for the decrease in the 
Texas output, being credited with 15,000 
barrels on January 15 against 20.000 barrels 
on December 31. Sour Lake increased its 
output by 600 barrels, and the other districts 
showed little change. 

Jennings is again producing more than 
20,000 barrels. The output for two days dur- 
ing the present month was above 27,000 
barrels, this being just after the Heywood 
Oil Company Nos. 3 and 4 were revived. 
These two wells made eleven tanks of oil, 
flowing naturally, in one day. The new 
Producers well on the Martin tract also 
helped to swell the Jennings output. 

One year ago the average daily output of 
the Gulf Coast districts was 104,881 barrels, 
of which the Texas fields supplied 60,277 



the high percentage of waste and evapora- 
tion and other considerations, make it im- 
portant to move it. Fuel oil consumers have 
been unwilling, as a rule, to make contracts 
in the face of the prevailing conditions. 
Furthermore, they have been advised by the 
brokers to buy spot oil, and many large pur- 
chasers, who, in past years, bought their oil 
on contract, are now buying is as they need 
it. This puts the burden of carrying the oil 
and of finding a market for it upon the com- 
panies which arc holding the large stocks 
of heavy or fuel oil, and as a result there 
has been considerable price-cutting at Hum- 
ble. Sales of oil on cars are reported at 35 
cents, which is only 2 cents above the credit 
balance price, and about the same as the 
mid-month contract figure. 

Jennings oil is responsible, to some extent, 
for the decline in the market. The comple- 
tion of the Texas Company's pipe line to 
Lake Charles — it is now laid as far as Welsh, 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 






about half way from the Jennings field to 
Lake Charles — will do more than any other 
one thing to equalize the prices of Louisiana 
and Texas fuel oil. The Jennings market 
for oil at the well is 23 and 24 cents, and 
for oil on board cars, 27 to 29 cents. The 
Texas Company's line will deliver oil to the 
Kansas City Southern railroad and that will 
mean an increase in the train load and car 
load shipments of Jennings fuel oil to Texas 
points. Furthermore, an interstate rate of 
14 cents a barrel from Jennings to the Mis- 
sissippi river at New Orleans on oil in train 
load lots, means that Jennings crude can be 
delivered to vessels on the Mississippi at a 
price ranging from 41 to 43 cents net. Tank 
steamers are loading Jennings oil at Ames- 
ville, opposite New Orleans, for shipment 
to New York. Every cargo that goes from 
Amesville decreases the demand for Texas 
crude at Port Arthur and Sabine. In other 
words, Jennings oil for fuel and gas making 
is cutting into the market hitherto supplied 
from the Texas fields. 

Another thing that is influencing the mar- 
ket is the decreased demand for oil at tide- 
water. Port shipments have shown a marked 
decline. The Standard Oil Company, which 
is the heaviest purhcaser of Texas oil at the 
seaboard, will not accept crude that tests 
under 21I/2 gravity. This excludes the heavy 
oil of Humble, Batson, Saratoga and Sour 
Lake. Humble oil, after remaining in open 
tanks for a while, and being piped to Port 
Arthur, tests under 20 gravity. This throws 
all of the accumulated stocks on the fuel 
market. — Oil Investors' Journal. 



EASTERN EXPORTS. 



Following are the exports of mineral oils 
fronl the Atlantic ports of the United States 
for the month of December, 1905 : 

Gallons. Dollars. 

Crude- 
Baltimore 6,948,387 366,735 

New York 8,663 766 

Philadelphia ' 273,770 24,519 

Galveston 1,411,507 70,575 

Total 8,642,327 462,595 

Naphthas — ■ 

New York 258,127 45,103 

Philadelphia 12,000 2,347 

Total 270,127 47.450 

Illuminating — 

Baltimore 670 68 

Boston - Charlestown 9,724 1,261 

Delaware 46,232 3,938 

New York 45,541,297 3,283,688 

Philadelphia 22,383,499 1,097,086 

Galveston 3,261,545 205,347 

Total 72,242,967 4,591,388 

Lubricating and Paraffin — 

Baltimore 316,448 39,849 

Boston - Charlestown 13,262 2,166 

New York 7,821,060 1,008,757 

Philadelphia 4,437,149 367,620 

Galveston n,375 i>593 

Total 12,599,294 1,419,985 

Residuum — 

Delamare 1,506 113 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 



Manufacturers of 




Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 



OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARLESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARL6SW0RTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything In Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, 
Toilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 

COAL1NGA, CAL. 



P&B 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 



^mmr* 







^s^^s^, 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



New York 8,371 

Philadelphia 6^062,657 174.^50 

1 alveston 1.070,690 31,866 

T« ital 7,1 .^-.-'-'4 -'06.479 

Total Mineral Oils — 

Baltimore 317,118 39017 

Boston - Charlestown 22,986 3,427 

Delaware 6,996,125 371 

New York 54.0.11.51s 4,338,564 

Philadelphia .^vi'»i."75 1,665,822 

Galveston ?-7~??-"7 3" 

Total 100,891,939 6,727,897 



Crude Oil for Hawaii. 
The Union Oil Co.'s tank barkentinc Ful- 
lerton was cleared Jan. 26th for Honolulu, 
via Port Harford, with 15.000 barrels of 
crude oil. in bulk, valued at $21,000. 



Big Pipe for Isthmus. 
The National Tube Compari) has closed 
a contract with the Union ( HI Company of 
California for fifty miles of eight-inch pipe 
to be used in piping oil across the isthmus. 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 
Following are the latest quotations for 
California crude oil at the wells as offered 
by the recognized buyers : 
Coalinga. 
22 deg. up tp, not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, not including 25 deg .22V2 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

Higher prices paid to favored companies 

on long time contracts. 

Kern River. 
No established quotation, price subject to 
contract with marketers. 

Santa Maria. 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25. . .20 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 22V2 

Higher prices paid on long time contracts. 

Eastern Quotations. 

Tiona $1 -68 

Pennsylvania 1 • 58 

Second Sand 1 . 58 

Corning 1 ■ 10 

Newcastle 1 



Cabell 1 

North Lima 

South Lima 

Indiana 

Somerset 

Ragland 

Corsicana, light 

Corsicana, heavy 

Canada 1 

Kansas Fuel Oil 

30 to 30% gravity 

30V0 to 31 gravity 

31 to 311/0 gravity 

31% to 32 gravity 

32 gravity and over 

Texas. 

Humble 

Batson, 22 

Batson, heavy 

Saratoga 

Sour Lake, 22 

Sour Lake, heavy 

Spindletop 



35 
18 

94 
89 
89 
89 

49 
89 

5° 
34 
35 
40 

43 

46 

49 

52 



•34 
•35 
■ 3 2 
•34 

.40 

•32 

•45 



WE ARE BUSY 



We are too busy to prepare an adv. this week. Our adv, in this paper last week 
on page 9 did the business. Practical buyers know a good stock. They know the 
GOLDFROG BIG C is alright. In a short time there will be a big advance in this 
stock. We have a few thousand shares left for immediate sale. The GOLDFROG 
BIG C is "making good." The BULLFROG EXTENSION has made another big 
strike. 

\\ rile us for latest in formation on either of these companies or any of the other 
operating companies of Nevada. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

A19 Rialto Building, -:- San Francisco, Cal. 

BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 



BAKERSFIELD, 



CALIFORMA 



INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stand ng price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will s ion be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be follow^ bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
. EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, January 31st: 

Associated — 

32,507 shares at . ■...,... .53 

Caribou — 

200 shares at 6.75 ■ 

Four — 

200 shares at • .30 

Independence — 

3,000 shares at 13 

Oil City Petroleum — 

1,500 shares at .70 

Sovereign — 

100 shares at 20 

Twenty-Eight — 

150 shares at 7.25 



.25 

■A 

•05 

. z 
. 12 

•37 



Asked. 
.50 



Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 
Bid. 

Alma 

Arline 

Apollo 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . . 

Aztec 

California-Standard . . . 

Caribou 6.75 

Central Point Com 1 .75 



.41 



•52 



Chicago Crude New .... .08 

Claremont ■■■"■' • 90 1 

Forty' 45 

Four 31 

Giant 50 

Hanford . 260 .00 

Home -. .-, . 40 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 16 

Independence . .'. 11 

Junction .,...".......-... ..... 

Kaweah 40 

Kern . ...,;..- 13.00 

Kern (New) 29 

Linda Vista .12 

McKittrick 09 

Monarch of Arizona 14 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va 03 

Oil City Petroleum 70 

Peerless 6.50 8 

Piedomnt 06 

Radium 10 

Reed Crude . . . 26 

Senator 1 . 60 

Shawmut 

Sovereign . ..- 20 

Sterling .:. ■. I -25 g 

Superior •'.'. .05 

Thirty-Three... . 5.00 6 

Toltec . .. '. 60 ... . 

Twenty-Eight 6.50 '7 

Union 163.00 165 

West Shore . . . -. . -. 1 .-45 ■ " ;? 

Wolverine > ......... .r .;■ ' 1 



08 

53 



42 
00 



09 

05 
50 
35 



50 
20 
00 
12 
20 



30 



11 
16 
80 
04 
72 
00 
07 
20 
28 

40 

25 
60 
06- 

75 

00".' 
00 

75 
00 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



DO YOU OWN DEAD MINING STOCK? 



If you have any dead ones, -write us the 
name of the company and how many shares 
you have and how much cash you paid for 
them. Then we will show you how to save 
your money. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

A 10 Rialto Building, 

San Francisco - - - California 



J. 8. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code** 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal, 

Telephone Main 1552 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX 237 -. 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULE 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

Oil Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 




OIL TANKS 

Oil Stills, Car Tanks, Riveted Pipe. Stor- 
age Tanks of every description. 

Our "Steel to Steel" joints guaranteed, 'not to leak. 
WRITE FOB ESTIMATES 

WM. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern BIdg., 
Chicago. Ills. 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, OAi_. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ii 



rrinle loomi 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wlttmann 



Jules 9 Restaurant 



Regular Dinner with wine, 75c. 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00. 



315-317 31^-321-323 

Puh St,. S. F. 



Open Ereoiag s 

Misic Sundays 



•••will ••• 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & CATHER, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS TURNOUTS 



New Rigs of All Kinds 
At Regular Union Rates 



Coallnga 



California 




WHEELER & WILSON MT1 CO, 

231 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 

Headquarters for the 
Pacific Coast 



SBVENTEEN [17] NEW 



L. C. SMITH & BROS. Typewriters 




Sold to 

Viva Co Five (5 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co.. .. Four (4) 



>7 



Also used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 
DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

110 Montgomery Street 



Branches: 



Portland 



Los Anget.es 



Seattxh 



Be sure to be properly equipped for your hunting trip. 
Use the "STEVENS'* and have the assurance that 
your choice cannot he improved upon, and that there 
Is no possibility of your game getting away when 
sighted by our guns. Our line: 

RIFLES, PISTOLS, SHOTGUNS 




The Pacific Underwriting 
and Trust Company. 

Home office, Parrott Building, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

If Capital Is desired for thr pro- 
motion ot any legitimate pt exposi- 
tion, Mining, Manufacturing. Irri- 
gation, Mercantile, Pate its or 
Railroads, we can assist you. 

Companies incorporated un- 
der any State Laws desired. 

Stocks and Bonds under- 
written. 

Gold Bonds, Interest from two 
to four per cent, for sale. 

Address all communications to 
the Company at its Home Office. 



GO 
TO 
THE 

PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



HU'H.'H 



Ask your dealer, and 
insist on our goods. If 

you cam: t obtain them 
we will ship direct, ex- 
press prepaid, upon 
receipt of price. 



DOnt FAIL to send for 

illustrated catalog. Itisa 
book of ready reference&nd 
appeals to all interested Id 
the grand sport of shoot- 
ing. Mailed for4 cents in 
stamps to pay postage. 



HITTHEMARKwlthourRIFLEPUZZLE! This 
clever novelty will be mailed FREE upon request. 

J. STEVENS AJtMS & TOOL CO., 

P. O, Box 4093. CHICOPBB FALLS, MASS., U.S.A. 

Cm 




Paul W. Pratzman 

118 New Montgomery St. 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 



Tel Mint 279' 6an Francisco 



A. ZELLERBACfl & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE. 

416, 4I8, 420, 422, 424, 426 

Sansome St., San Francisco 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twine 
and Supplies of every description 
Incidental to the trade. 

we cany the uunn stock. Oar price, are 
Bqoltablt. 

T«l. Main, 1188. 



PATENT S — United States and 

eaaaaaeaeeaaaaaeaeeeaai Foreign. Trade 

Marks Registered. J. M. NE8BIT, 
Attorney, 921 Park Building 
Pittsburg, Pa. 



for your 



JOB PRINTING 



Best Work 
Lowest Prices 



The Star Drilling Machine 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon fram« The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
Is usually advisable to have boiler crating for oil or gas. 
of machine for oil and gas works. It 

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Barron, Rickard & McCone, California Agents, San Francisco 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



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PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, February lO, 1900 



Number 15 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' 
Association. 



Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 
E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 

Office and Editorial Rooms 
318 Pine Street San Francisco, California 
Telephone Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 . 5° 

Three Months 1.00 

Single Copies 10 

Foreign Postage $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Request. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, 
Draft, or Registered Letter, addressed to 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San 
Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Communications 
must be accompanied by writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, 
California, as seco nd-class matter. 

Standard Oil Company is about to in- 
crease its capitalization from $100,000,000 to 
$600,000,000 for the apparent purpose of de- 
creasing its dividends per share from 40 or 
48 cents to something like 7 or 8 cents, 
which will give the rotten corporation the 
appearance of conducting its business along 
more legitimate lines than is evidenced by 
its present enormous dividends. Possibly 
the New Jersey corporation may mistake 
the present disgust of the people for greed 
and believe that it can shield itself behind a 
larger capitalization and small proportional 
earnings. But the monopoly has overlooked 
one fact — that its entire invested capital, as- 
sets, or future outlook does not warrant any- 
thing near its original capitalization. 
Seventy-five to one hundred millions of dol- 
lars will fully represent the monopoly's in- 
vestments, contracts and enhancement in 
the value of the same. Any valuation placed 
on the company's stock above a par value of 
the above amount is, then, based wholly on 
its earning capacity and not upon the worth 
of its visable assets. The Standard Oil 
Company is not the only corporation that 
bases the worth of its stock upon its earn- 
ing power. There are corporations in this 
State (California), the value of whose prop- 
erty can be placed at only a fraction of their 
capitalization. The present invested capi- 
tal in the California oil fields probably ag- 



gregates close to $100,000,000. This is cer- 
tainly an extreme estimate, the true invest- 
ment, beyond a doubt, falling below this 
mark. At least four-fifths of the invested 
capitalization is represented in the produc- 
ing companies. It must therefore be seen 
that the monopolies in tihs State, represent- 
ing a oossible one-fifth of the invested capi- 
tal in the industry, arc using to all intents 
and purpose, the remaining four-fifths, be- 
ing enabled to do this from the fact that the 
major portion of the invested capital outside 
of the monopolies will tie up their invest- 
ments by long time contracts to the one- 
fifth represented by the monopolies thus 
enabling the latter to work not only its own 
investment of possibly twenty millions of 
dollars but to actually operate on the capi- 
tal represented in the companies tied up to 
it in contracts. 

A long time contract with a producing 
company at a stated price is equivalent to 
its subsidization for the period named in the 
contract. The great stronghold of the Stan- 



dard ( >il Company has been its policy of not 
becoming, lo any extent, a producer of the 
commodity it marketed. Mad it become a 
producer of oil, entering into the risks and 
failures of development, the Rockefeller for- 
tune would never have been accumulated. 
It was alone from the fact that the monop- 
oly was enabled, by railroad discriminations, 
to compel the successful producer to sell its 
oil at a fraction of its value — without en- 
tailing the losses of the unsuccessful oper- 
ator — that it was enabled to thrive. Ray 
Stannard Baker tells us of the great fish that 
would not stop gapping until it had swallow- 
ed the whole parish. Gentlemen, there are 
some great fish among you. They are gap- 
ing continually and have been since you 
demonstrated that oil in commercial quan- 
tities could be developed in this State. 
Among these fish is a still greater one 
awaiting the time when the first shall have 
become fat from gapping in your properties 
when it, in turn, will swallow them up. This 
last and great fish is Standard Oil. 



California Oil Producers' Association 



The first general meeting of the California 
Oil Producers' Association, numbering 
160 members, was held in the assembly 
room, Mills Building, on Wednesday night 
last. The unexpected large attendance and 
enthusiasm! shown evinced the spirit of the 
independent producers and their determina- 
tion to meet the issue of the present crisis 
in the Oil industry. At the opening of the 
meeting it was shown that the original idea 
of acquiring the California Petroleum Mi- 
ners' Association was untenable on account 
of that organiaztion being unwilling to turn 
its charter over to the new organization or 
to state under what terms it would take in 
enough members of the new organization to 
control the older one. The body therefore 
at once proceeded to form a permanent or- 
ganization under the name of the California 
Oil Producers' Association. The following 
minutes of the meeting gives a clear idea 
of the business transacted : 

A meeting of the California Oil Producers' Asso- 
ciation was held this day I Feb. 7th) at 7:30 p. m. 
at the Assembly Room. Mills Bldg. Mr. S. W. Morse- 
head, temporary chairman, presided, and Mr. H. L. 
Moxfield acted as temporary secretary. 

The Chairman opened the meeting by briefly set- 
ting forth the objects of the Associated; that it was 
the intention to organize an information bureau that 
would issue comparative statements every month, 
keeping the members fully posted on conditions, 
which would possibly have the effect of getting a 
better price for the oil. The organization would be 



formed on the lines of an educational society and lie 
suggested a Board of Directors to consist of eleven 
members. 

The Secretary read the minutes of the previous 
committee meetings and it was moved by Mr. T. J. ■ 
Crowley and seconded by Mr. Bridge that the min- 
utes be adopted as read. Carried. 

Remarks were made by Mr. Turner, Mr. Shannon, 
Mr. G. A. Scott. 

It was then moved by Mr. G. A. Scott and seconded 
by Mr. Turner that it is the sense of this meeting 
that we should form an organization and associated 
along the lines as outlined by the Chairman and 
that the Chair be asked to appoint a committee of 
five of those present as a Committee on Organiza- 
tion. Carried. 

The Chair then appointed the following commit- 
tee: Messrs. J. F.. Davies. John Hinkel. W. B Robb. 
Sam Shannon, W. S. Morton. 

It was then duly moved and seconded that a recess 
of ten minutes be declared to give the committee 
time to report. Carried. 

Wben the meeting was called to order, the Organ- 
ization Committee presented the following report: 

"That it has elcted Mr. W. S. Morton Chairman;'' 

"That this Associated shall be created for the 
purpose of gathering statistics connected with the 
nil industry of California, forming a closer relation- 
ship between the oil producrs, acquainting them with 
the possibilities of distribution and consumption and 
for such other matters as may be of particular 
benefit to the industry in general. That such in- 
formation connected therewith be distributed among 
the members of the Associated at such times as may 
be fixed by the Board of Directors. That the admin- 
istration shall consist of elevn directors, viz: 
A from Coalinga. 1 from Santa Maria. 

5 from Kern County, 1 from Los Angeles; 
who shall represent their respective districts The 
said directors to be elected by a postal card ballot. 
?very member being entitled to vote for eleven di- 
rectors." 

It was moved by Mr. G. A. Scott and seconded by 
Mr. F. S. Cleary that the report be adopted. Carried. 

Mr Bridege moved, seconded bv Mr. John Hinkel. 
that this association be called The California Oil 
Producers' Association. Carried. 

After some discussion, it was moved by Mr. Weil 
and seconded by Mr. Turner, that the Directors, when 
elected, shall have full power to proceed to organize 
this Association along such lines as they deem for 
the best interests of the Association, to prescribe 
what officers shall be elected and their duties and 
elect such officers from among the members of this 
Association, excepting clerical offices. Carried. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



It was then moved by Mr. G. A. Scott and seconded 
by Mr. E. E. Jones, that the Chair appoint a nomi- 
nating committee to consist of five members, who 
shall select names for the offices of directors and 
shall send out ballots and collect same. Carried. 

The Chair then appointed the following committee: 
Messrs. Kobb, Morton, Maxfield, Wm. Hinkel, Davies. 

Mr. Maxfield moved, seconded by Mr. Cleary, that 
letter be formulated and sent to members with bal- 
lots, inviting co-operation in securing other members 
and inviting such members as signed to pay in mem- 
bership and return it with their vote. Carried. 

The following gentlemen then addressed the meet- 
ing- Mr. H. H. Blood, Mr. Dallas of Coalinga, Mr. 
Robb, Mr. Turner, Mr. Morshead, Mr. Siger, Mr. 
Clough. 

After some discussion as to how many names shall 
appear on the postal ballot, it was moved by Mr. 
Shannon and seconded by Mr. Weil that twice the 
number of names from each district be placed upon 
the postal cards for vote. Carried. 

The Chair then discharged the Organization Com- 
mittee with thanks. 

It was then moved by Mr. Scott and seconded by 
Mr Turner, that the entire matter of nomination ot 
directors and the matter of conducting the election 
be left to this Committee on Nominations and that 
they notify the directorsele-ct of their election and 
that these directors shall then take change of the 
organization and perfect same and that they may 
call this body together again at their will. Carried. 

On motion of Mr. Morton, seconded by Mr. Hinkel, 
the meeting took a recess to the call of the Chair. 

While it was the intention of the organiza- 
tion to conduct the preliminary steps of the 
organization along the lines of an informa- 
tion bureau, leaving later issues to be delib- 
erated upon by the executive council in pri- 
vate session, the radical sentiment soon pre- 
dominated and stirring speeches were de- 
livered by men of prominence in the indus- 
try. 

Mr. H. H. Blood, a prominent oil pro- 
ducer, and a prime mover in several previous 
organizations, including the present success- 
ful Oil Producers' Agency of Bakersfleld, 
arose and said : 

"Gentlemen, there is no denying what we 
are here for. We are here to combine our- 
selves in a body for self protection against 
the oppressions of monopoly that we may 
receive a better price for our oil. 

"The greatest obstacle is procrastination," 
declared Mr. Blood. "This has been the 
death of every organization of this kind 
which had for its purpose the uniting of the 
entire oil interests in the State. Just as soon 
as the interests we are fighting discover that 
we mean business their agents will begin the 
work of holding out special inducements to 
the strongest of our members. 

"The temptation to become disloyal will 
be great, but I want to say to you all that 
we must stand firm and not listen to the 
sweet voice of the tempter. We can win 
this fight for fair treatment if we stick to- 
gether. We are being robbed, every one of 
us. We cannot produce oil at the prices 
now offered, which range from 15 to 19 and 
possibly 20 cents a barrel. We should get 
no less than 30 cents a barrel for our pro- 
duct, and if we unite and appoint one man 
to deal with the representatives of the Stan- 
dard Oil Compaany and the Associated Oil 
Company we can get our price without 
much difficulty. We must not be unjust in 



our demands, but must be satisfied with a 
fair price that will enable our companies to 
pay dividends on our stocks without dipping 
into our capital to do so." 

Mr. T. R. Turner, representing several 
Coalinga corporations then said : "Do not 
deceive yourselves, you are making no 
money in the oil business. Many of us are 
getting dividends and are led into the be- 
lief that we are profiting by our investments. 
But where is your investment? It is eaten 
up by the great corporations that are buying 
your oil and in a few years you will awake 
to find that you have received a fair interest 
on your money but your capital is gone. 
Your oil properties have been divested of 
their richness and all that marks the last 
resting place of your investments is a mold- 
ering pile of junk." 

Mr. S. W. Morsehead, the temporary 



chairman, then arose and said he had hoped 
to reserve such sentiments for later meet- 
ings of the executive committee, but, said 
he, "It is of no use. It is the unanimous 
voice of the producers. We are here to fight, 
and fight we must. We will put our oil in 
the hands of an executive board and one 
man shall sell it. We will fight fire with 
fire. We now have to see one man of the 
Standard or the Associated to sell our oil — 
we will put our properties in such shape that 
they will have to see one man, the represen- 
tative of this body, to get our product, and 
they will have to pay for it" 

The election of the eleven directors of the 
California Oil Producers' Association will 
have been accomplished by the middle of 
next week and a meeting of the same will 
be called at once for the election, from that 
body, of the permanent officers. No time 
will be lost in bringing the issue to a crisis. 



Mews from the Field 



COALINGA. 



Coalinga, Cal., Feb. 7. — Coalinga Peerless 
has completed well No. 9 and No. 10 is be- 
ing drilled in. The production has been in- 
creased rapidly and the property is con- 
sidered one of the best in the field. With 
the completion of No. 10 well the company 
will have nine good oil producers, they hav- 
ing drilled one water well. 

California Oilfields Limited is running 
four strings of tools, two on new work, one 
deepening and one cleaning out. The big 
gusher of this company (we believe it No. 
27) will be producing again within a few 
days. This is the banner company of the 
field. Stock is quoted on the London Ex- 
change at over £6 per share on a par value 
of £1. 

A great deal of un satisfaction exists in 
this field at the alleged dishonest and un- 
businesslike methods employed by the 
Southern Pacific Railroad Company in the 
handling of its leases. The company seems 
to regret that it had leased any part of its 
land and is doing all in its power to freeze 
out those who have leased it. The Cory & 
Canfield lease is an instance where it was 
successful, but in other cases where the 
railroad company has used uncomplimen- 
tary methods it has been told of a region 
"mucho caliente" where it and its disreputa- 
ble methods may go. Coalinga producers 
are alive to the situation and the pressure 
that is being brought to bear in other loca- 



lities is said to be bringing the railroad 
company to a point where it is not only 
willing but glad to make any kind of a com- 
promise to get out of the nest it has fool- 
ishly run into. 

Coalinga-Pacific have their rig No. 4 com- 
pleted and will soon spud in. 

Penn-Coalinga No. 1 has been cleaned out. 
Mr. Smith expects to have her on the pump 
this week; she acts like a good well. 

The new well of the San Francisco Crude 
is about 1000 feet deep and going nicely. 
Mr. Clery is well pleased with the forma- 
tion. 

The W. K. Oil Company have pulled their 
4%-inch and 6-inch and are now going 
ahead with their 8-inch which is going very 
satisfactorily. 

The Pittsburg Oil Company have a very 
nice showing of oil sand out on southwest 
% of section 24-19-15, at about 2500 feet. 

The M. K. & T. Oil Company are pre- 
paring to go ahead with their No. 2. Prince 
de Long does not do things by "halves," as 
is evidenced by the splendid equipment in- 
stalled upon their property. 

Mr. T. R. Turner, interested in several of 
the big oil companies here, spent several 
days in the field looking after the interests 
of his companies. He expresses confidence 
in the future outlook. 

Mr. Seely has assumed temporary control 
of the management of the Independence Oil 
Company in this field. 

Mr. Geo. Cameron of the Coalinga Oil 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



and Transportation Company (now a sub- 
sidary of the Associated) came in last Sun- 
day, lie will look over the company's lines 
while here. 

The 22 Oil Company will commence spud- 
ding in their Xo. I well the coming week, 
the contract having been let tor the drill- 
ing. 

There seems to be an increasing demand 
for oil in this field, despite the contrary! 
claims. Every pipe line is being called on, 
to its full capacity to deliver oil. Several 
companies who are delivering oil to their 
customers are very anxious to secure con- 
tracts at an advance over present prices. 

The California Diamond Oil Company's 
well No. 4 is about 1200 feet deep. Well 
Xo. 3 is being cleaned out. The superin-t 
tendent has constructed some roads upon 
the property very much needed; everything 
has an air of business about the property. 

The Union Oil Company on section 13^ 
20-14 will start up No. 8 in a few days. They 
are deepening their No. 7 well. 

The Coalinga Petroleum Oil Company, on 
section 14-20-14, known as "Liza Jane," are 
starting a new rig. 

The Wabash Oil Company have reperfor- 
ated No. 6, which has greatly improved the 
well. 

Penn-Coalinga Oil Company's well No. 3 
since cleaning out has improved, doing now 
about 150 barrels per day. They are clean- 
ing out well No. 1. 

The Cypress Oil Company have landed 
their 8-inch drive pipe in their No. I well. 
Oil is standing within 200 feet cf the sur- 
face. They expect to start upon X T o. 2 next 
week. 

At station No. 1 of the Coalinga Oil and 
Transportation Company they are install- 
ing an additional boiler, which will give 
them a battery of five boilers. It is expected 
this will give them the required energy to 
drive 1200 barrels of oil through the line 
daily. This will enable them to meet the 
demand upon them for the oil from the field. 

Record Oil Company will spud in No. 2 
well in the near future. 

Twenty-Two Oil Company will start up 
on No. 1 well soon. The rig is on the 
ground. 

Avon Oil Company expect to start an- 
other well this spring. 

Several wells now drilling in this field will 
be finished soon, among them Pittsburg- 
Coalinga No. 2, McCreary Xo. 1. and Oyama 
No. 1. 



These are all deep wells, being below the 
2000-foot level. 

Inca Oil Company is drilling No. 3. 

R. Carl Piaker has just finished No. 5 well 
on the St. Taul lease. 

Coalinga-Pacific is preparing to spud in 
No. 4. 

Lucile Oil Company will start up on the 
7th and will then commence to put in its 
6-inch drive pipe. This well is now 2100 
feet deep. Oil is expected at no greater 
depth than 2300 feet. The field in general 
is quiet. Very few new rigs are going up 
owing to prevailing low price. The new 
work is not maintaining production, which 
is declining rapidly, amounting to no more 
than twenty thousand barrels daily. No 
new work to speak of will be commenced 
until such a time as a better price can be 
procured for the product. 

California & New York Oil Company's 
well No. 3 is over 1230 feet deep. They ex- 
pect to encounter the first oil sand at 1400 
feet, the recent formation is very satisfac- 
tory. A very pleasing sight is the large 
stream of oil flowing into the two big gauge 
tanks from the spacious settling reservoir. 
The company have enlarged their tankage 
for their water supply. 

The California Monarch Oil Company are 
still pushing the production and expects this 
year at least to double the present output. 
They are preparing for the more extensive 
development. The field representative re- 
ports all wells doing finely. Well No. 12 is 
completed. The gusher, well No. 1, is be- 
ing worked upon with every indication that 
it will soon add very materially to the pro- 
duction. 



KERN COUNTY. 



Bakersfield, Cal., Feb. 2. — The production 
of the Kern River fieid for the month of 
January has been slightly more than for 
December. This is accounted for by oil that 
was carried over from December in sump 
holes and run during January, thus appar- 
entlv increasing January's production some- 
what. 

No new work of any kind is contemplated 
in this field. While the general impression 
is that conditions must improve some time 
during the year, yet the absence of any et - 
couragement from the large buyers and 
consumers of oil to increase the production 
prevents those companies having undevelop- 
ed territory from drilling any more new 
wells until they have some assurance that 
prices will advance. 



The sale of the 200,000 barrels of oil in 

Storage by the West Shore Oil Company is 
a favorable indication that the large buyers 
are on the outlook for any oil they can pos- 
sibly get at reasonable prices. No one in 
the Kern River field doubts for a moment 
the price paid for this lot of oil was 20 cents, 
as the West Shore has stated time and time 
again that they would not sell a barrel of 
oil for less than 20 cents, and as they are one 
of the few companies in the field that does 
not have to sell their oil in order to meet 
running expenses and to keep going, the 
fact of the sale being made is good proof the 
Standard is picking up all the oil it can 
find. 

The contract with the Monte Cristo ip 
generally understood to be at the same fig- 
ure, ie., 20 cents. If the Standard Oil Com- 
pany is gathering in all the oil it can find for 
20 cents, the chances of the Independent 
Producers getting this figure for the oil they 
have in storage with the Associated Oil are 
very good indeed. 

What has been done in regard to the fu- 
ture contract with the Independents is not 
known outside the executive body of that 
association. It has been rumored the In- 
dependents have been given to understand 
their oil would be taken care of and at a no 
less figure than the present price of 18 cents. 

Considering the large amount of oil that 
must necessarily have been taken from 
storage and pumped through the Standard's 
line during the time it has been in operation 
has designs on the future contracts with the 
Independents looks encouraging to the small 
producer. 

The Southern Pacific's rifled pipe line has 
been under test for the last two weeks. Dur- 
ing the last week the pump has been forcing 
oil into the line. From last reports the oil 
has not yet reached the other end, Delano. 
Several times, as usual on new lines, breaks 
have occurred which has taken a good deal 
of time to repair and get the line in shape to 
make another test. 

It will very likely be two weeks more 
before all the tests have been applied and it 
is known whether the new invention is a 
full success or not. 

Shipments by rail have been larger than 
during December, 3700 cars of an average 
capacity of 230 barrels to the car having 
gone out, making a total of 851,000 barrels, 
the total production for the month being 
1,080,000 barrels, which leaves only 229,000 
barrels having gone into storage or shipped 
through pipe lines. 

It is generally conceded that more oil is 
being shipped from the field than is pro- 
duced. How long the big consumers will 
be content to draw on the storage oil even 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



if only to the extent of from 50,000 to 100,- 
000 barrels per month, before stimulating 
the production by an increase of price is the 
question that concerns the producers of the 
Kern county fields. 

Reports from the Coalinga field are that 
the producers have nearly shut down all 
drilling operations, while all the large buy- 
ers are exerting every effort to secure all the 
oil possible from that field. The fact of 
there being no oil in storage at Coalinga, 
and the production at a standstill, while 
stocks are being drawn on in the Kern 
River field, leads the oil men to think some 
slight change will be made in prices before 
very long. 

The Fearless Oil Company at McKittrick, 
which brought in the big gas well some 
weeks ago, and which for a while has been 
shut down, will start up in a few days and 
try to finish the well to the oil sand which 
they are confident is no great depth below 
the present large body of gas. 

No new work of any kind seems to be 
thought of in the McKittrick district. The 
shipments from there keep up to about the 
usual average. The prospect of McKittrick 
getting better, unless the Fearless opens up 
some new territory north of the regular 
field, is very slight. 

The shut down in the Midway by the 
Santa Fe after the deal for the entire hold- 
ings of the Chanslor-Canfield Midway Oil 
Company was finished surprised all oil men 
in the district. Whether the theory that 
pressure had been brought to bear on the 
Santa Fe by the Associated Oil Company, 
forcing them to shut down is so or not, no 
one outside the officials themselves know for 
sure. Whether or not this was the real 
reason,' the shut down and the cessation of 
all work on the extension of the railroad is 
a great disappointment to oil men having 
holdings in the Midway field, who saw in 
the active work of the Santa Fe and the 
extension of the road some chance to dis- 
pose of their oil which has been locked in for 
the last five years. If this shut down is 
made for another term of five years most of 
the owners of that field will be tempted to 
dispose of their holdings for a fraction of 
their real value in preference to taking the 
chances of waiting to dispose of their pro- 
duction. 

The shipment of road oil from Sunset 
steadily continue to increase and, with the 
opening of spring, the producers of the 
heavy oil think the market will have in- 
creased to an extent that will nearly care for 
the entire Sunset production. 

The Webb-foot Oil Syndicate are still 
working on their well. No oil has been 
found yet. Active drilling had to be su- 
spended for a short time waiting for broken 
engine parts. 

The Vishnue Oil Company, operating in 
the Cuyama Valley, is starting down with 



still another string of pipe. Indications for 
oil are plentiful in this district and expert 
oil men think there is an excellent chance 
of good wells being brought in. 

F. J. Carman on the Grace well is still 
making progress in getting ready to pump 
the well from the sand found at about 1400 
feet. 

The Apollo has just finished redrilling an 
old well, which, when started to pumping, 
produced as much oil as a new well drilled 
in new territory instead of being an old well 
surrounded on all sides by wells which have 
been steadily pumped for several years pasx. 

The Buckeye refinery will be ready to 
commence operations in a short time. Mr. 
McVean has been working constantly get- 
ting things in shape for the past several 
weeks. 

Jones & Liscombe, who purchased the old 
Southwestern Refinery plant, will have it 
in operation in a short time. 

When so many refineries are able to start 
up and dispose of their product, the condi- 
tions of the asphalt and distillate markets 
must show some slight improvements. 

C. W. 



THE SOUTHERN FIELDS. 



Los Angeles, Feb. 7th. — The prospects of 
a new field in Los Angeles county near the 
ocean front not far from the new harbors at 
Willmington and Long Beach is coming to 
the point where it may at any time become 
a possible factor in the future of the oil in- 
dustry. Some three months ago, one A. J. 
Large, a rancher about two miles west of 
Wilmington and three miles from San Pe- 
dro, dug a well for water and found it full 
of gas. The matter was kept quiet for some 
weeks and then a number of local people, 
farmers and capitalists of Long Beach, San 
Pedro and Wilmington formed the Wil- 
mington Gas and Oil Company to develop 
the land. So far no active steps have been 
taken to carry the matter forward. 

However, in the meantime, others have 
become interested. Mrs. E. A. Summers, 
the "oil queen" of Los Angeles, and Edward 
Strassburg visited the neighborhood in De- 
cember and purchased eighty acres adjoin- 
ing the Large property from William Kol- 
horst, a neighboring rancher. The price was 
$260 an acre, a much less figure than would 
doubtless have been demanded if the rancher 
had suspected what the purchasers were 
figuring on. The papers in the transfer 
were made out to Mr. Strassburger and he 
has said nothing as to his intentions. He 
has been for many years a prominent oper- 
ator in the city field. 

Last week Mrs. Summers was again a 
visitor to the Large well, this time being ac- 
companied by several others, some of them 
strangers, said to be Eastern capitalists. The 



utmost secrecy is being observed in all this, 
no intimation of the names or intentions of 
the party having been made public. Re- 
quests for information have been met with 
anabsolute refusal to answer any questions 
or by formal denials that may mean any- 
thing or nothing according to construction 
placed upon them by the questioner. 

The region where this interest is being 
aroused has been prospect over to a con- 
siderable extent in years gone by. One or 
two wells were sunk to very shallow depths 
at different points without result. Then the 
big production elsewhere and low prices dis- 
couraged all efforts to further explore the 
ground. The chief indication of the pres- 
ence of oil has been the frequent appearance 
of gas in wells. William Kolhorst, owner of 
the land purchased by Mr. Strassburger, had 
this experience in his own well. The latter 
is 385 feet deep. The Large well is 450 feet 
deep. Four hundred feet was about the 
depth to which wells were sunk in prospect- 
ing for oil indications. It is said that small 
quantities of oil have been found at shallow 
depths at one or two points near San Pedro, 
but the amount was insignificant. While 
the entire district is merely prospective it is 
the opinion of some competent judges that 
the oil belt extends all the way to the ocean. 

Mrs. Summers is figuring prominently in 
the talk about the new movements, is popu- 
larly credited with having dealings with the 
Standard. So quiet have all the moves been 
made that scarcely a word has found its way 
into print until this week. 

Within the next sixty days the Amalga- 
mated will put into use its pipe line delivery 
system for fuel in the main manufacturing 
district east of Central Avenue and west of 
the Los Angeles River, franchises for which 
were granted some months ago. The main 
line will extend from the company's tanks at 
Alhambra avenue and Bloom street south to 
Seventh street, a distance of twelve or four- 
teen blocks. It will be a 6-inch pipe with 
3 and 4 inch laterals to consumers tanks. A 
pumping station with two 18 x 7 x 12 pumps 
is being built to take up the oil as brought in 
by the field line from the Salt Lake wells 
and distribute it. The refinery is being 
erected at this point so that either crude di- 
rect from the well or the treated fuel can be 
furnished. 

The installation of this system ; will great- 
ly reduce the cost of delivery and will result 
in taking off the streets many of the ill- 
smelling delivery wagons that are anything 
but pleasing. Whenever circumstances 
justify it is likely that the system will be 
extended to other districts. Through this 
the Associated-Amalgamated gains a dis- 
tinct advantage over its rivals in furnishing 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



fuel as when once a big consumer has his 
tanks connected with the tanks of the com- 
bine it is likely to be more difficult for any 
other concern to capture his trade. Whether 
any others will try to install lines of their 
own is doubtful. The Union is the only one 
that appears to be in a position to even con- 
sider such a move and it is giving far more 
attention u> other matters and does not ap- 
pear to he making any great effort to fight 
the Associated here. A. R. II. 



SANTA MARIA. 



Santa Maria. Cal., Feb. f. — Port Harford, 
or San Luis Bay, which for decades has re- 
mained a quiet unobserved harbor, is at- 
tracting unusual attention just at present 
on account of its future distributing point 
for the large oil fields back of it : the newly 
developing San Luis Obispo field and the 
already heavily productive Santa Maria 
oil wells. The San Luis and Santa Maria 
chambers of commerce are earnestly peti- 
tioning our United States Senators and our 
State Congressional Representatives to 
make a sub-port of entry of San Luis to fa- 
cilitate the clearance of the Union Oil Com- 
pany and the Pacific Coast Oil Company's 
foreign laden oil vessels as well as for the fu- 
ture prospective foreign business of this 
port. 

Two pipe lines from the Santa Maria 
fields have oil continually flowing into stor- 
age tanks at the port for the loading of ves- 
sels. Two more pipe lines are proposed in 
the near future, an additional one of the 
Union and another for the new intended re- 
finery of the Graciosa Oil Company, which 
has been given so much publicity in the re- 
cent daily newspapers, so that we need not 
here refer to it. 

Our Senators and Representatives have 
very cordially responded. Senator Perkins 
is doing what he finds feasible in the mat- 
ter, and Representative Smith of this dis- 
trict with the promised co-operation of other- 
California Representatives will further Per- 
kin's Senate bill when it comes up to the 
House. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



The water has been pumped out of the 
Murchie mine and the company is now run- 
ning full time drifting. Ore values increase 
with every month's work on this property, 
which is now considered one of the fore- 
most dividend paying mines in the State. 

At the Empire mine underground work is 
being prosecuted vigorously and the large 
force of men is being worked full time. The 
mill is running to its full capacity and turn- 
ing out good values. This is a most excel- 
lent property. 

The Standard, which has been pumping 



Bakersfield oil through the pipe line to Point 

Richmond since the first of the year, has 

discontinued the shipment of the Kern River 
petroleum, and the stations on the line south 

of Mendota have been closed down. There 
appears to be as much uncertainty ali.nu the 
resumption of pumping operations at the 
southern end of the line as during the clos- 
ing months of last year. About a year ago 

the Standard was considering a project for 
the doubling of the line between Mendota 
and Point Richmond, for the purpose of 
running the Bakersfield oil separate from the 
Coalinga product, which keeps the present 
line busy. So far as can be learned, no steps 
are being taken to carry out this plan. 

Within the past few weeks there has been 
a noticeable increase in the demand for oil 
producing properties in the Pennsylvania 
and West Virginia field. Brokers have been 
commissioned to look up properties with a 
settled production and get quotations, but 
holders are not anxiouse to part with the 
properties at what would formerly have 
been called a big price. Two of the reasons 
given for the shar padvance in prices asked 
is that the chances for securing new produc- 
tion would be to practically retire from the 
producing business. Another reason given 
is the failure of the old fields with the as- 
sistant of the new pools to meet the demand 
for high grade crude. Those who keep in 
touch with the business are aware that it 
will not be but a short time till the stocks 
are wiped out if the present and past year's 
consumption should be maintained. 

The transformation that has come over 
the fuel prospects of California is remark- 
able. A few years ago the State seemed to 
be at a deadlock for the lack of a fuel that is 
now not only abundant for her own pur- 
poses, but with which she is able to go into 
larger markets. Ten years ago coal was 
California's one resource for power, and her 
own supply of coal was, and still is, so 
small, even for domestic purposes, that she 
was compelled to import nearly all that she 
needed from Oregon, from British Colum- 
bia, and even from Australia and England. 
This was, of course, a paralyzing and al- 
most prohibitive drag upon her industries, 
and it involved a large monetary loss to the 
State and to the country. In the matter of 
fuel, California has now become a seller in- 
stead of a purchaser, and the money that is 
represented by fuel is coming into the State 
instead of going out of it. 

The failure to find strictly new producing 
territory, capable of furnishing high grade 
crude, causes operators to take an interst in 
new strikes inside of the old defined limits 
if there is room for a pool. For more than 
two years the discovery of small pools has 
been the only thing to encourage a continu- 
ance of operations in nearly every producing 



district. A recent discovery of this kind in 
Clarion county has stirred up a little excite- 
ment and leases have been in demand at a 
Fair bonus. Two or three weeks ago the 
Clarion Gas Company, an auxiliary of the 
Pittsburg Oil and Gas Company, drilled in 
a test well on the J. P. Reed farm, located 
north of Miola, Highland township, Clarion 
county, and got what is proving to be a very 
good producer. The oil was developed in 
the third sand and the hole filled up 500 feet 
with fluid. As soon as the well began to 
show oil it was shut down and the informa- 
tion kept from the public till more territory 
had been taken up in the vicinity. Thisj 
having been accomplished the well was drill- 
ed through the sand and two weeks ago 
was put to pumping and has since then been 
averaging 16 barrels a day. A second well 
was at once started on the same farm anrj 
is now due in the sand. 

Oil companies paid dividends on February 
1st as follows: Associated, ii/g cents per 
share, $600,000 ; Claremont, 1 cent per share, 
$4500. 

The dividends paid during January, 1906, 
by oil companies whose stocks are listed on 
the California Stock and Oil Exclrange 
amounted to $120,082. 



EARLY DAYS IN THE OIL FIELDS. 



Titusville, Pa., has the honor of being the 
place where rock oil was first found in large 
enough quantities to make it commercially 
valuable. There on boring down a few 
hundred feet, it was found that oil could be 
pumped out of the rocks like water and a 
craze was started that is still going on after 
more than forty yearse have elapsed and 
gives no sign of abatement. 

As the quality of the oil is nearly the same 
as that derived from coal, the inventions al- 
ready made served for the utilization of this 
also, though in this as in everything else 
mankind has kept going on to perfection. 

Throughout western Pennsylvania, West 
Virginia and eastern Ohio which were the 
main centers of production for the first 25 
years, the oil was found in a porous sand- 
stone lying under the coal measures and 
above thick deposits of Devonian shale, 
which contained a good deal of carbonace- 
ous matter. These shales crop out con- 
tinuously from a little south of Rochester, 
N. Y., all along parallel to Lake Erie to the 
vicinity of Sandusky, Ohio, and then turn 
south, continuing to the Ohio, near the 
mouth of the Scioto River. Over all the 
area south and east of this line these shales 
are several hundred feet thick, and are 
reached by the drill at depths ranging from 
a few hundred to 2,000 or 3,000 feet. 

In Ohio these shales contain from one to 
20 per cent of very fine comminuted carbon- 
aceous matter, derived probably from sea- 
weed which floated around in the Devonian 
period over the Mississippi valley, as it does 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



now in the Sargossa Sea in the middle of 
the Atlantic. Indeed, in the earlier period 
of which we have just spoken Prof. New- 
berry was proposing to obtain oil by distill- 
ing this shale, from which he calculated oil 
could be produced indefinitely at 25 cents a 
gallon. It is comforting to think that we 
have this source of supply to fall back upon 
when our present methods fail. 

The most plausible theory to account for 
the great supplies of oil which are now 
found in the "oil sands" of western Penn- 
sylvania and vicinity is that it is a slow ac- 
cumulation from the distillation of these 
shales, which has been unable to escape 
through the compact rocks covering the 
surface and has found refuge in the inter- 
stices and crevices of the loose sandstone 
overlying the shale. 

This theory is supported first by the fact 
that oil is found largely in connection with 
coal beds, and hence cannot have' been de- 
rived from them. Second, by the fact that 
where these shales are at the surface and 
there is no compact rock over them, such as 
would confine the gas into which the oil 
would distil, oil is not found in large quan- 
tities. 

Speaking thus of gas makes it necessary 
to say something of the connection between 
gas and oil. Chemically they are practically 
the same, consisting of carbon and hydro- 
gen. A large amount of gas almost always 
escapes from oil wells, while often gas only 
is produced. These were at first called dry 
wells, and were then thought to be useless, 
the gas being allowed to escape into the air. 
What was well called the "Mulligan Snor- 
ter," for years poured forth its bent up 
treasure into the air of western Pennsyl- 
vania with a sound that could be heard for 
miles, like a steamboat whistle. 




TO PIPE PETROLEUM ACROSS THE 
ISTHMUS. 



Connecting the output of the oil fields on 
the California shore by a pipe line across 
the Isthmus of Panama, delivering 24,000 
barrels a day, with the seaboard cities of 
the Atlantic Coast, the Union Steamship 
Company has completed the purchase of the 
Minnewaska and the Minnetonka, American 
steamships, which for more than a year have 
been lying idle at South Brooklyn. Subsi- 
diary to the Union Oil Company of Califor- 
nia, the Union Steamship Company will take 
its new purchases to Newport News and 
convert them into tank steamers with a 
carrying capacity of 52,500 barrels. The 
company already owns three tank steam- 
ships, three plying on the Atlantic Coast. 
The new vesse's will become the largest oil 
carriers under the American flag. 

For more than a year the Union Company 
had been seeking the concession across the 
Isthmus. The company first obtained the 
consent of the Republic of Panama. Secre- 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 






Manufacturers of 



Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 



Works: Cor. New Main and Date streets, 
Baker Block 



P. O. Box 231, Station C 
Telephone Main 196 



Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARI.ESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARLfiSWORTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 




Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wag n Tanks, 
T ilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind 



P&B 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 



Mills 



COALINGA, CAL. 




CAB TANKS & STORAGE TANKS 



FOR ALL USES 



We Carry in Stock Car Tanks of following sizes: 

6,000 Gallons 
7,000 " 
8,000 " 

and can mount on wood or steel underframes. 



We Carry in Stock Storage Tanks for Oil 
of all sizes up to and including 

SB, OOO BARRELS 



Oil Refineries Complete Our Specialty 



WARREN CITV BOILER WORKS 

OFFICB AND WORK S:— W ARBEN, OHIO 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tary Taft signed thi ion on consider- 

ation that the oil company p \ $500 a month 
rental and sell its oil to the Canal Commis- 
sion at ninety cents a b rrel. It is a matter 
of record that Theodore P. Shonts, chair- 
man of the Canal Commissi' n, opposed the 
concession, stating that it w< uld practically 
amount to a monopoly of the oil business. 



Crude Oil for Hawaii. 

The tank ship Marion Chilcott was clear- 
ed yesterday for Honolulu, via Monterey, 
with 16,000 barrels of crude oil in bulk, 
valued at $22400, and 4400 gallons of gas- 
oline and 6600 gallons ,,f distillate, valued at 
$1870. The crude oil is to be laden at Mon- 
terey. 



Dividends. 

The following dividends have been de- 
clared on stocks of oil companies listed on 
the California Stock and Oil Exchange : 
Associated Oil Stock & Trust Cer. .$ .oiy 2 

Claremont Oil 01 

Imperial Oil 20 

Thirty-Three 10 

LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
California crude oil at the wells as offered 
by the recognized buyers : 
Coalinga. 
22 deg. up to, not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, not including 25 deg .22 1 /*: 

2 5 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

Higher prices paid to favored companies 

on long time contracts. 

Kern River. 
No established quotation, price subject to 
contract with marketers. 

Santa Maria. 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25 . . .20 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 22^/2 

Higher prices paid on long time contiacts. 

Eastern Quotations. 

Tiona $1 .68 

Pennsylvania 1 . 58 

Second Sand 1 . 58 

Corning 1 . 10 

Newcastle 1.35 

Cabell 1. 18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1 . 34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30V2 gravity 40 

30% to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 3114 gravity 46 

31% to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 

Texas. 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy 32 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 



WE ARE BUSY 



We arc too busy to prepare an adv. this week. Our adv. in this paper last week 
on page 9 did the business. I 'radical buyers know a good stock. They know the 
1 ;< >l DFROG BIG C is alright. In a short time there will be a big advance in this 
stock. We have a few thousand shares left for immediate sale. The GOLDFROG 
BIG C is "making good." The BULLFROG EXTENSION has made another big 
strike. 

Write us for latest information on cither of these companies or any of the other 
operating companies of Nevada. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

AH) Rialto Building, =:= San Francisco, Cal. 

BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIELD, - - CALIFORNIA 

INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stand ng price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will sion be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be followed by a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, February 7th : 

ASSOCIATED— 

6000 shares at 49 

5529 shares at 50 

CARIBOU— 

10O shares at 6 . 75 

HOME— 

1000 shares at 42 

INDEPENDENCE— 

1000 shares at 09 

3000 shares at 10 

1000 shares at 11 

KERN— 

20 shares at 13.00 

MONTE CRISTO— 

300 shares at 70 

TWENTY-EIGHT— 

50 shares at .' 6.25 

50 shares at 6.50 

50 shares at 6.75 

100 shares at 6 . 87% 

WEST SHORE— 

100 shares at 1.65 



Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 
Bid. 

Alma 25 

Arline . 41 

Apollo ; . .05 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . . .49 

Aztec .12 

California-Standard ... .37 .42 

Caribou 6.75 7.00 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 



Asked. 
.50 

.08 

•50 



.08 



.28 
.50 
260.00 
.40 
.42 



.07 



Chicago Crude New 

Claremont 

Forty 

Four 

Giant 

Hanford 

Home 

Homestake 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 

Junction 

Kaweah 40 

Kern :... . 12.50 

Kern (New) 

Linda Vista 

McKittrick . ...... 

Monarch of Arizona 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va. 
Oil City Petroleum . 

Peerless 

Piedomnt 

Radium 

Reed Crude 

Senator , 

Shawmut 

Soverign 20 

Sterling . 1.25 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5 .00 

Toltec 50 

Twenty-Eight 6.37 

Union 163 . 00 

West Shore 1 . 70 

Wolverine : ' 



90 

45 



.09 

■OS 
•5o 
•35 



•5° 



29 



1 



.12 
.08 

••13 
.70 

•03 
.64 

!o6 
. 10 
.26 
60 



.20 

15-75 
. 11 
.20 

13.00 
•30 

.11 
.18 
.80 
.04 
.70 
9.00 
.07 
.20 
.28 

.40 
•30 

2.00 
.06 

6-75 

6-75 

165.00 
1.85 
1.00 



Robt. B. Todd, E. M. 

(of Todd-Holm Co., Assayers and Chemists) 

P. O. Box 227 
GOLDFIBLD, NEVADA 

Will Examine and Report on Mines 

Can assist on purchase of Mines and Prospects 
References on application 



DO YOU OWN DEAD MINING STOCK? 



If you have any dead ones, write us the 
name of the company and how many shares 
you have and how much cash you paid for 
them. Then we will show you how to save 
your money. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

A 10 Rialto Building, 

San Francisco - - California 



J. S. EWBN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

All "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code" 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1S5S 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 







TANKS 
TANKS 

TANKS 


TANKS 
TANKS 
TAN 


TANKS TANKS 
TANKS TANKS 
TANKS TANKS 


ANY KIND- 


-ANY SIZE- 


ANY NUMBER-ANY WHERE 


TANKS 
TANKS 
TANKS 


TANKS 
TANKS 
TANKS 


TANKS TANKS 
TANKS TANKS 
TANKS TANKS 



CONTRACT 

Drilling deep wells 
Tor OH or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX *" 



W. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., Chicago 

WANTED 




W. E. YOULE 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

OH Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LODIS 0BISF0, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 

FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RE CORDS AND CONVEYANCE 

Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 

NO. 1115 K ST., FRESNO, CAL. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



11 

- -MAPS-- 

ALL KINDS OF MAPS 

Small Maps Large Maps Indexed Maps 

Blue Prints White Prints 

Printed Maps 

Coalinga Blue Trints $1.50 

Kern River " " 1.50 

McKittrick " " 1.50 

Sunset — Midway " " 1.50 

Santa Maria " " I)6x6o 5.00 

Prices on other maps or special work 
quoted on application. 

ACCURACY OUR MOTTO 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, California 



Private Rooms 



Phone Main 5966 



Jules Wittmann 



JULES 1 RESTAURANT 



315-317-319-321-323 
PINE ST., S. F. 



Regular Dinner with Wine, .75 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 



... V/l IT... 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & GATHER, Proprietor 
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS 

AT REGULAR UNION RATES 
NEW RIGS OF ALL KINDS 

Coalinga, . . . . . . California 




SEVENTEEN [17] NEW 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITERS 

SOLD TO 

Viva Co Five (5) 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Co. .Four (4) 




Also Used by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 



17 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. csl M. ALEXANDER <a CO. 

IIO Montgomery Street 

Branches: Portland Los Angeles Seattle 



WHEELER & WILSON MT'G CO. 

231 Sutler Street 
5an Francisco 

"""'^ Pacific Coast 




Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

are perfect In every respect. Trie sportsman Is never 
disiii^iiuedin the working- of his gun if it's a STEV- 
ENS — they are safe, strong, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

"We will send yr.u ourvaluable 140-page book, tell- 
ing' all about STEVENS arms, shouting, hunting, 
notes on the proper care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 cents in stamps. 

FRKF. PTJZZL.E! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and Insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, we ship direct, express pre- 
paid, on receipt of catalog price, 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 

P. O. Box 4093. 
CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS., U.S.A. 



Go 



to the 



PACIFIC , REPORTER 

oIl 



San Francisco* Cal. 



for your 



Job p rinting 



BEST WORK • • 
LOWEST PRICES 



PAUL W. PRUTZMAN 

113 New Montgomery Street 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 

Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBAGH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE 

416-418-420-422-424-426 SANSOME ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paper and Paper Bags, Twin! and Supplies of oiory 
description incidental to trie trade. We carry 
the largest Stock. Our Prices are Equitable 

Telephone Private Ex! 14- 



PATENTS 

United States and Foreign 
Trade Marks Registered 

J. M. NESBIT, Attorney 

921 Park Bldg, Pittsburg, Pa. 



Ol)£ Star iDrilluta. 3ttacl)ute 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
of machine for oil and gas works. It erating for oil or gas. 

is usually advisable to have boiler „ . , ..... 

mounted upon trucks separate. " s tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. 
They are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the 
road. Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 

STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 

AKRON, OHIO 

HARRON, RICKARD & McGONE, California Agents, San Francisco 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



1 ASPHALTAGE ' 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



California ^sp Ijaltum 

Salts ^Agenc? 



TH 



'MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



GENERAL. OFFICES 



MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE z=I CHICAGO OFFICE 



WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magazine describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is more beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
it is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
l\OSCAI F EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND . 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 



Phone James 7116 



315 California St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



SMITH, EMERY & CO, 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TESTS, INSPECTIONS 




Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases Salts; Clay 



Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

SJL1V FRANCISCO 




PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED \BS7. 



A.LESCHEN & SONS ROPE CO. 

ST. LOUIS, MO.i 




we are: agents f^or 



LESCHEN LINES. 



R. H. HERRON COMPANY 



AND CARRY THEM IN 6TOOK AT 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

3Foser>I) 3\eid (BasTEitaute (To, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

* ROD TWO CYCLE GAS ENGINE * 



oooooooooooooooooooowoooooo 

The only reverse gear 
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used for drilling, clean- 
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ing tubing and rods, 
in fact any work that 
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FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 

Pacific Coast Agent ... - Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Volume 7. 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, February 17, 1906 



Number 10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Published Weekly. 
The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners' 
Association. 

Maria R. Winn, Proprietor. 

E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. 

Karl R. Eastman Field Manager 

Office and Editorial Rooms 
318 Pine Street San Francisco, California 
Telephone Bush 176. 

TERMS 

One Year $2.50 

Six Months 1 . 50 

Three Months 1 .00 

Single Copies 10 

Foreign Postage $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Request. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, 
Draft, or Registered Letter, addressed to 
Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San 
Francisco, rooms 31-32-33. Communications 
must be accompanied by writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a guarantee of good faith. 

Entered at the Postoffice at San Francisco, 
California, as second-class matter. 

That oft repeated question, "what connec- 
tion is there between the Union Oil Com- 
pany of California and the Standard Oil 
Company," has again been asked us. It is a 
question we have answered so many times 
that we have commenced to become impa- 
tient at what we can look at in no other 
light than a case of extreme stupidity. There 
seems to be a prevailing opinion among 
many interested in the oil industry that 
nothing of consequence can happen outside 
of the Standard Oil Company, and the mere 
fact that the Union Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia is a very successful corporation seems 
to them sufficient evidence that some af- 
filiation exists. For the benefit of inquiring 
parties, and our readers in general, we will 
again say that we have determined, beyond 
a doubt, that the Standard Oil Company has 
no interest in the Union Oil Company, either 
directly or indirectly, neither has it any in- 
terest in the United Petroleum Company 
nor any other company allied with the 
Union; neither has the Union Oil Company 
or its allied corporations any interest in the 
Standard Oil Company. Their interests are 
diverse and, to a great measure, antagonistic 



The) are competitors in everj sense of the 
word. The interests of the Union Oil Com- 
pany are largely identified with the other 
independent producers of the State, and 
the company believes that the oil industry 
should be controlled by the legitimate pro- 
ducers of oil. 



Those oil men who are looking for a great 
overproduction from the Santa Maria oil 
district are likely to meet with considerable 
disappointment. It has been authentically 
learned that the Union Oil Company of. 
California, which produces the greater part 
of the oil from that field, has found it neces- 
sary to make strenuous efforts to increase 
its production in order to have a 
sufficient output to supply the demand when 
its Isthmian pipe-line is completed. The 
company will make an effort to create a sur- 
plus of oil in its reservoirs during the nxt 
few months, but its growing demands here 



will necessitate drilling continuously for 
some time to come to fill its own require- 
ments. Our oft repeated statement that the 
Union Oil Company is not producing com- 
petitive oil is well founded, so far as inde- 
pendent oil is concerned. The entire pro- 
duction of the company goes into new mar- 
kets in which it has always been a pioneer. 
That the Union Oil Company is a strong and 
persistent competitor to the Standard Oil 
Company and its allies there is no doubt, but 
it is not a producer of cheap oil and does not 
manipulate the market to this end. The 
Union Oil Company of California is, in every 
sense of the word, an independent producer 
of oil, which it markets itself — usually in 
markets which it has opened up. The com- 
pany has unlimited proven oil land to drill 
and its output is limited only to the extent 
of the development it sees fit to make. It 
develops its territory only as it needs the oil. 



The Panama Pipe* Line 

OF THE 

Union Oil Company of California 



Acting upon a plan formulated some two 
and a half years ago, the Union Oil Com- 
pany of California has determined to extend 
its already enormous business by entering 
the markets of the Atlantic seaboard and 
Europe as a marketer of crude and refined 
petroleum oils. Every detail of the prelim- 
inary work in this gigantic movement has 
been successfully worked out and by August 
next California oil will be flowing through 
an Isthmian pipe-line to supply a cheaper 
fuel for the great industrial enterprises of 
the East. 

As early as July, 1903, Mr. John Baker 
Jr.. manager of the marine, sales and manu- 
facturing departments of the Union Oil 
Company of California, conceived the pos- 
sibilities of successfully marketing Califor- 
nia oils in the East. Transportation was 
the only drawback. Being absolutely an 
independent company it could not and would 
not secure railroad rebates. Shipments by 
trans-continental lines were, then, out of the 
question. The two months' voyage around 
the "Horn" was expensive and dangerous 
and was not considered. An Isthmian pipe- 
line was the only practicable solution of the 



question, and it was along these lines that 
the company has persistently worked ever 
since, with the result that it is now under- 
taking the largest proposotion of the kind 
ever attempted by an oil company in the his- 
tory of the business. 

The first and greatest obstacle in the car- 
rying out of Mr. Baker's plans was the se- 
curing of a franchise for a right of way 
across the Isthmus. A concession was se- 
cured from the Republic of Panama to cross 
its territory and permission from the United 
States Government was obtained to cross 
the canal zone, over which it has jurisdic- 
tion. 

The pipe-line will be laid along the Pan- 
ama Railway right of way which is almost 
parallel with the proposed route of the canal. 
The Pacific terminus will be near the City 
of Panama and the Atlantic terminus near 
the City of Colon, the distance being prac- 
tically fifty miles which will be the length 
of the line. There will be only one pumping 
station, which will be located at the initial 
station— Panama. This will be sufficient to 
force the oil to Colon as the maximum eleva- 
tion is but 210 feet. The line will be eight- 



4 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



inch and will have a capacity of 25,000 bar- 
rels daily. The pipe has been purchased 
from) the National Tube Co. of Pittsburg-, 
Pa., and shipments have already commenced 
to Baltimore, Md., from which point it will 
be transported to Colon, two steamers hav- 
ing been already chartered by the Union Oil 
Company of California for this purpose. 
These steamers will stay in the service until 
the material for the tanks, boilers, pumps 
and other supplies have been shipped to 
Colon. The company expects to have the 
line completed and in working order by July 
1st next. Mr. R. W. Fenn, who has been 



however, justifies a still -greater carrying 
capacity/and at least three more tank steam- 
ers will be constructed for the service, each 
having a carrying capacity of over 9000 tons 
each. The last two vessels purchased by 
the compan-,' are the Minnetonka and Minne- 
waska, which are now at Newport News 
undergoing repairs. They willbe renamed 
Santa Rita and Santa Maria. The Lansing, 
which was purchased in the East some four 
months ago, will soon be at Port San Fran- 
cisco. 

The names, class and capacity of the 
present fleet are as follows : 



Company. It has a capitalization of $5,000,- 
000. Mr. John Baker, Jr., is president and 
Mr. George J. Remington secretary. The 
offices are in the Mills building, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Unusual activity prevails in every depart- 
ment of the Union Oil Company of Califor- 
nia. Extensive drilling commenced on its 
Santa Maria oil property several months 
ago to increase its production sufficiently to 
meet the demands. The company's 'refinery 
at Oleum, just across the bay from Sah 
Francisco, is being enlarged to ten times its 
present capacity. Two hundred men are 




Union Steamship Company's Tank Steamer "Roma," Capacity 1,155,000 Gallons 

connected with the Union Oil Company of Capacity in employed on this work, boiler makers, ma- 
California for many years, will have charge Name. Class. gallons, chinists, masons, carpenters, etc., all work- 

of the work. He is already at the Isthmus Lansing .'tank steamer 1,974,000 { ns - under rush orders. The company's 

busy with the preliminary work. Mr. Washtenaw..... 1,239,000 product from its Santa Maria wells is par- 
Thomas L. Galvin, the National Tube Com- Roma i,i5S.ooo ticularly suitable for refining, and it is un- 

pany's expert, has been engaged and will Argyll 1,125,600 derstood that it will not only market fuel 

have charge of the actual laying of the line. Whittier 474,6oo ;i t> ut a i so tne var ious grades of refined 

During the past four months the Union Fullerton Ship 672,000 oi i s _ The Oteum refinery of the Union Oil 

Oil Co. of California has purchased six ad- Santa Paula 344,400 Company of California will shortly become 

ditional steamers, which, added to its already Santa Rita tank steamer 2,205,000 one f tne i ar g es t industries in this State. 

large fleet, makes it the largest and most effi- Santa Maria 2,205,000 g y t ^ e t ; me tne isthmian pipe line is ready 

cient fleet of oil carrying vessels afloat. Three To better facilitate the carrying out of the for operation the company will, in every 

of the vessels are the largest tank steamers company's great shipping interest a sub- sense of the word, be capable of supplying 

under the American flag. The volume of sidiary corporation was recently formed its demand. Should the United States Canal 

business to be carried on by this company, which is known as the Union Steamship Commission adopt the use of oil for fuel in 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



the construction <>i the canal the pipe line 
will enable the company to deliver <>il at any 
point it may desire, 

Mr. John Baker Jr.'s untiring efforts 
is due, to a very great extent, the suco 
the Union < >il Company of California in thus 
establishing itself at the head of all produc- 
if petroleum oils. Mr. l!aker 
has devoted his time exclusively ami con- 
tinuously to the Panama pine line scheme 
for more than two and a half years. During 
the last year he traveled over 52.000 miles. 
which included a trip to the Isthmus, a two 
weeks' stay there, and canvassing the mar- 
ket- of the Atlantic coast of this country; 
also visiting England, France and Germany. 
The Union Oil Company of California has 
over 170,000 acres of oil land in California, 
nearlv all of which is conceded to be ex- 
tremely rich and productive territory. Its 
output is apparently limited only by the ex- 
tent of its developments. About 75,000 
acres of its territory lies in the well-known 
Santa Maria district. The company has a 
pipe line to this district, the seaboard ter- 
minus being Port Harford, where it has 
storage tanks, wharfage facilities, etc. Its 
wharfage facilities at Oleum, where one of 
its refineries is located, are being increased 
to accommodate five tank steamers at a 
time. It is establishing numerous storage 
plants in Eastern ports and Europe. When 
the company's present plans have been com- 
pleted the Union will be the largest produc- 
ing company in the world handling and re- 
fining its own product. 



SEPARATION OF PETROLEUM OILS 
ACCORDING TO THEIR MOL- 
ECULAR DENSITY. 



We have just received from Messrs. Wells 
& Wells, Columbus, Ohio, four complete sets 
of samples of oils separated according to 
their molecular density without chemical 
change of their molecular structure, and, 
consequently, without loss of material. The 
samples referred to are thus refined from oil 
from the following fields : Bakersfie'id, Cal., 
Beaumont, Tex., Tiona, Pa., and Ebano, 
Mexico. An inspection of the Bakersfieid 
samples would quickly dissipate any idea 
one might have that Bakersfieid oil cannot 
be refined to advantage. The other samples 
are equally interesting. 

The illuminating portions of petroleum 
thus refined possess their full inherent illum- 
inating properties and, because of the per- 
fection of their separation — an inherent im- 
possibility by fractional distillation — and the 
retention of their inherent perfection, the 
illuminating portions may be of much 
greater specific gravity and equal illumin- 
ants than the illuminating portions of the 
same petroleums refined by the usual pro- 
cess of fractional distillation, that necessar- 
ily contain entrained unvaporized viscous 
matter. Consequently kerosene from Cali- 
fornia petroleums, thus refined, show by 



con- 



photometric test- thai they possess equal 

illuminating properties to the illumin.mts of, 
any other petroleum. [ t , s expected to be 
understood that illuminating oils of greal 
specific gravity must have their proper- 
ditions 01 lessened wick travel and mere 
chimney draft. 

The comparative value of the illummants 
"t California petroleums— of which Wells & 
Wells have had six distinct samples— rang- 
ing from 14 to 27 Dannie— is paralleled by 
the lubricating portions thereof in flash and 
tire test and unctuousness, while the quan- 
tity, viscosity ami specific gravity of the 
lubricants varies approximately with the 
specific gravity of the petroleum. 

The unevaporable portion or asphalt con- 
tained in the petroleum measures the oxid- 
ization and probably the oxidizableness of 
the petroleum. 

Refining petroleum by mechanical separa- 
tion at temperatures insufficient to chemi- 
cally combine therewith sulphur petroleum 
may contain, said sulphur is practically no 
other detriment than so much loss. 

Decomposition being in no manner ac- 
complished by Messrs. Wells & Wells' pro- 
cess, the refined portions of petroleum pos- 
sess their original affinity ; consequently the 
extremes of light and heavy portions per- 
fectly diffuse, thus they have no bottoms and 
tops. 

By retaining the original perfection of 
petroleum in the refined products thereof, 
the lubricating oils require no reinforcement 
of animal or vegetable oils. 

By the above process of refining all of any 
petroleum at one simple economical rapid 
operation, reduces the expense of refining to 
the minimum. 

The samples referred to from Tiona petro- 
leum are precisely as received from the re- 
fining apparatus. The other samples are 
practically as received from the refining ap- 
paratus. 

The Pacific Oil Reporter has the samples 
of oils above referred to on exhibition at its 
office, rooms 31, 32, ^, 318 Pine street, San 
Francisco, California. They will be cheer- 
fully shown to interested parties. 



BRITISH CAPITAL AND CALIFORNIA 
OIL. 

The Feeling in London. 



(Special to the Pacific Oil Reporter.) 
. .London, Feb. 1. — We learn on good au- 
thority that the attitude of British oil men 
toward California oil field undertakings has 

MAPS. 

Up-to-date, white-print official maps of 

Goldfield and Bullfrog. Size 20x30 inches. 

Answers purpose of maps costing $2.50 to $5 

each. 25 cents each. Stamps taken. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

Suite A 10, Rialto Building, 

San Francisco - - - California 



greatly improved since the advent of the 
present year. It is the opinion of quite a 
number of practical men that there ought 
to he a good opening for British capital in 
the oil fields of California. This improved 
change of Feeling is the result of the tem- 
porary disarrangement of the Russian oil 
system. It is also due to the fact that some 
of the best men in the business have figured 
it out that larger profits can be made in 
California than in Baku; at any rate the 
opinion is growing that capital invested in 
California is more likely to bring relable 
and permanent results. Heavy royalties and 
serious labor troubles are seriously militat- 
ing against the restoration of order and 
sound busines in the Caucasus. On the other 
hand, oil men in London are not overlooking 
the fact that the statistics for 1905 show that 
there is a great future for California oil, 
that it ought to make profits for those wh(5 
invest in it. and that it should, quite apart 
from American consumption, do a great deal 
more in the way of contributing to the fuel 
and kerosene needs of other parts of the 
world. The greatest interest has been taken 
on this side of the Atlantic in the remark- 
able figures which ave been issued for 1905. 
The publication of these statistics by the 
Pacific Oil Reporter is certain to do the Cali- 
fornia oil industry a great deal of good. It 
is also recognized that California is well to 
the front in the enterprising treatment of the 
commercial and scientific problems of liquid 
fuel. 



A VALUABLE VOLUME. 

In a bulky and attractive volume entitled 
Baku; An Eventful History, by Mr. J. D. 
Henry, editor of the Petroleum World, of 
London, and well known for his writings 
on oil subjects, has written the history of 
the Russian oil'fields and described many of 
the great events of 1905, when, our readers 
will remember, the oil fields of that country 
were practically destroyed amidst scenes of 
fire and massacre. This is perhaps the most 
thrilling story of oil that has ever been pub- 
lished, and we understand that it has cre- 
ated a great stir in oil centres on the other 
side of the Atlantic. It is a profusely illus- 
trated volume and contains much technical 
information of interest to oil men in all parts 
of the world. The book is published by 
Messrs. A. Constable & Co. (16 James street, 
Haymarket, S. W.), in the front rank of 
London publishing houses, at the price of $3. 



OF INTEREST TO OIL MEN. 
Smith, Emery & Co., whose advertisement 
appears on the back cover of this journal, 
have issued two very neat pamphlets — 
Technico-Legal Practie, and Assays, which 
should be of interest to our readers. They 
show, concisely, the high class of work 
which is being accomplished by the firm, 
which has made wonderful strides in the 
way of euipment which is said to be the 
most complete to be found on the Pacific 
Coast. The pamphlets will be mailed free 
to any address on request to the company. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



News from the Field 



KERN COUNTY. 



Bakersfield, Cat, Feb. 17.— Oil from the 
Kern River field is still moving to the ca- 
pacity of the wells of the entire district. 
There is but very little doubt that this 
month will see still a larger draft on the 
storage than any month previous. The out- 
look is better than it has been for several 
months past. 

It is reported on good authority that the 
Independent Oil Producers' Agency has an 
offer for the entire amount stored by the 
agency in the reservoirs of the Associated 
Oil Co. of better than 20 cents per barrel. 
If this proves to be correct the next con- 
tract made by the agency for the 1906 pro- 
duction will be made at an advance that will 
allow the producers some profit in produc- 
ing oil. 

Under the terms of the contract between 
the Associated Oil Co. and the Independent 
Producers' Agency the Associated has an 
option to take the stored oil of the agency 
at the same price as that made by any pros- 
pective buyer. This offer will therefore 
force the Associated to pay the price of 20 
cents or better, or alio wsome other buyer 
to come into the field, which would be of 
no harm to the smaller producers having oil 
for sale. 

The Southern Pacific pipe line to Delano 
has been working for the past week, and is 
undoubtedly a success, whether or not it 
will be capable of handling the large amount 
of oil per day claimed by the inventor and 
indorsed by the Southern Pacific officials 
remains to be seen, but the fact of being able 
to force the heavy Kern River oil a distance 
of 32 miles with only one pumping station 
is proof positive that the line is already 
more of a success than the Standard Oil 
Co. line with stations 28 miles apart, which 
had to be doubled and a station put every 
14 miles to pump the oil with any degree of 
success. It is the general opinion, while not 
given out by the railroad officials, that with 
the completion of the tests, the line will be 
surveyed and layed all the way to Oakland. 

With two pipe lines out of the field with 
an aggregate capacity of at least 30,000 bar- 
rels per day, the excuse of the railroad in 
not furnishing cars for the small producer 
will be done away with and an ample supply 
of tank cars will be ready for any of the 
smaller companies who can secure contracts 
for a limited amount of oil per week or 
month. 

Mr. Alex Work, who is well known to the 
majority of the oil men of the Kern River 
field, having had charge of the Union Oil 
Co.'s work during the time they were build- 
ing the 500,000-barrel reservoir in this field, 
left this week from Los Angeles for the 
Isthmus of Panama, where he will be en- 



gaged in the work of laying the pipe line 
across. Tom Galvin, who is well known to 
every oil man of the East, and who recently 
visited the Kern River field in the interest 
of the National Tube Co., will have personal 
supervision of laying the line. 

From the high ability of the men the 
Union have at the scene of operations, and 
the rush orders' for pipe to the mills, there 
is the certainty that work on this line is go- 
ing to be rushed with all possible speed, and 
in a few months the Union will be in posi- 
tion to land oil in any part of Europe or on 
the Atlantic seaboard. 

Monte. Cristo Oil Co. has a derrick up for 
one more new well. With the contract with 
the Standard, this company will drill several 
more wells: on their property. They now 
have 49 wells on the pump, and have several 
acres of good territory untouched, which 
they will drill during this year. 

The Peerless Oil Co. find no difficulty in 
keeping up their large production with one 
string of tools drilling new wells and two 
more cleaning out and fixing the older wells 
on the lease. 

President Wm.'Ellery of the Independent 
Oil Producers' Agency and the heavy own- 
er in the Sterling and Sovereign Oil com- 
panies, was in the field during the week vis- 
iting the property. 

The Sterlng has a large portion of the best 
territory in the field still undrilled, but until 
the conditions improve this will not be 
touched as the line is well protected by wells 
on every side, and is drained only by the 
company's own pumps. 

The Enterprise Oil Co., owned by Henry 
S.' Bridges of San Francisio, has been sold 
to the Federated Oil Co., and will be oper- 
ated and managed by it from now on. Being 
adjacent to other properties of the Feder- 
ated, the expenses of operation will be con- 
siderably reduced by being operated from 
the central plant of the Federated situated 
on the Lackawanna property. 

The Southern Pacific Co. is excavating a 
large 250,000-barrel reservoir on. the north- 
eastern part of their property adjoining the 
Thirty-Three Oil Co.'s land. As there is no 
development work near this portion of the 
S. P.'s land, it looks very much as if they 
intended drilling more wells in the extreme 
eastern part of the field. ■ This part of the 
field has never been exploited since the 
boom days of four or five years ago, and 
while very little oil was discovered there, 
at the same time the methods of drilling 
were not near so thorough and successful 
as the hundreds Of wells drilled since then. 
It may be that with the knowledge of Kern 
River formations gained during several 
years drilling, paying wells may be brought 
in on what has been thought to be compar- 
ative worthless territory. 

The bulk of development on Thirty-Three 
Oil Co.'s property has been on the west por- 
tion of their land and- very little attention has 
been paid to that on the east, and it is 
thought the Southern Pacific will at least 



prove this portion of the field to be of some 
value. 

The old Southwestern Refinery recently 
bought by Liscomb and Jones of the Fed- 
erated Oil Co., will be given a thorough 
overhauling and as soon as possible to get 
the machinery in operation, will be started 
up to its full capacity. 

The California Kern Refinery under the 
energetic direction of Mr. D. E. Mack, its 
present superintendent, is running to its full 
capacity and finding a ready sale for its en- 
tire output of high grade distillate and as- 
phalt. The steady increase in the demand 
for distillate and other refinery products is 
slowly but steadily helping to solve the 
problem of what shall be done with the 
Kern River oil. 

For the last few years the path of the re- 
finery man in this field has been full of 
thorns on account of the limited demand for 
their products, but recently the demand has 
so increased that nearly every refinery in the 
field is running to its full capacity and some 
of them find it necessary to enlarge their 
plants to keep up with the demand for their 
products. 

Mr. W. W. Bess, superintendent of the 
Petroleum Center Oil' Co., of Sunset dis- 
trict, is in town and reports conditions at 
Sunset in about the- same way they have 
been for some months past. 

The operators in' that district have not 
gotten over the shock of learning the rail- 
road would not extend the line to the Mid- 
way district as yet, when they had banked 
so much on this extension letting them de- 
velop the west side fields. The cessation of 
work by the Sante Fe places them back in 
the gloomy state they have been in for two 
years past. 

The Fearless Oil Co. at McKittrick is still 
going down iwth the 8-inch pipe. No furth- 
er indications of oil have been discovered 
other than the great flow of gas found at 
about 1000 feet. 

T. O. Turner, general manager of the 
Eastern Consolidated Oil Co. and refinery 
in connection, visited the plant during the 
week. The Eastern Refinery, with com- 
pany of the other refineries in the field, con-> 
tinues to run day and night in the endeavor 
to keep up with the demand for refinery 
products. 

Shipments of oil for the last ten days have 
been as heavy, if not heavier, than for the 
corresponding time of last month. The 
Standard pumped 200,000 barrels through 
the line during the early part of January, 
and the S. P. line to Delano has been con- 
stantly at work during this week. 

Many of the drillers and lease men of the 
Kern River district have been shipped to the 
southern part of Mexico, where a large 
company is exploiting the oil territory in the 
extreme southeastern portion of that Repub- 
lic. Reports from those who have returned 
and sent other men to take their places 
shows plenty of oil there, but the climate is 
very severe on "men who have to work as 
hard as drillers on oil wells. 

The superintendent of the Rival Oil Co. 
in the eastern hills of Midway, Mr. Sieple, 
reports that work will soon be commenced 
on this property. The Rival is back farther 
in the hills than any oil has been developed 
to date, but the ' indications are such that 
there is no doubt of finding oil in some quan- 
tity where the company is drilling. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



COALINGA. 



The Record i - building a Hi; for 

their No. j well, which it hopes to spud in 
next week, The company lias ordered a 
special string of u'j-inch pipe, long collars 
with 10 threads to the inch; it intends to 
carry this string to uoo or 1300 feet and 
shut off the water. 

The Inca 1 'il Co. has shut off the water 
in No. 3 and will now reach out for the oil 
sand. 

The Porter v\- Scribner (formerly the Na- 
than) has pulled the 6^-inch casing out of 
its well No. 3. and is putting in a string of 
6-inch pipe with which it hopes to shut off 
the water. 

The Coalinga-Pacific Oil Co. is spudding 
in its Xo. 4. 

The EI Zuma Pura has been absorbed by 
the Confidence Oil Co. 

Well Xo. 3 of the California and New 
York Oil Co. has the water shut off at 1240 
feet. It has 1260 feet of 6-inch drive pipe in. 
It has saved the string of 10-inch drive pipe 
with shoe. Well Xo. 2 is being cleaned out. 
Well No..I keeps up production very satis- 
factorily. 

Well Xo. 1, the gusher, of the California 
Monarch Oil Co., is yielding a fine stream of 
oil with a tremendous gas pressure. It is 
under complete control, two lead lines carry- 
ing the oil out from the derrick. Wells 1, 2, 
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11 and 12 were all producing 
when we called the eariy part of the week. 
Well No. 13, on section 26, is going nicely. 
It is near the 2300-foot mark, with heavy 
6-inch drive pipe. 

The Oyama Oil Co., section 34-19-15, has 
its No. 1 well over 2100 feet with very en- 
couraging oil sand. 

The Forty Oil Co.'s well No. 2 is flowing. 
Well No. 3 is in 2150 feet deep with a very 
fine showing. 

The Peerless Oil Co. is cleaning out its 
well No. 9, which is looking well. 

The Kaweah Oil Co. has its "Tavern" well 
No. 2 in fine shape again ; it has landed its 
10-inch pipe at 1680 feet, and is putting in 
8-inch drive pipe. 

The California Oil Fields, Ltd., has built 
three very neat cottages on section 21 and 
27. This company continues to make last- 
ing improvements upon their property, a 
showing of confidence in the field, in the in- 
dustry, worthy of the gentlemen who have 
control. 

The California Diamond Oil Co. has per- 
forated its well No. 3. which had been deep- 
ened, and it is showing up fine. Its Xo. 4 
well is in first oil sand. 



SANTA MARIA. 

Santa Maria, Cal.. Feb. 14. — The great 
gusher of the Union is still active, though 
with lesss oil since the well of the Brook- 
shire tapped its underground gaS pressure. 
At first it subsided considerably, but it has 
partly regained its Row, which we should 
still estimate as better than 1500 barrels 
per day. What a wonderful producer after 
fifti en months not to have exhausted its gas 
and oil supply. The whole belt is remark- 
able for its gushers, and all well borers now 
try to prevent, if possible, the gushing out 
of oil, maintaining a column of water and 
capping- the well if necessary. 

The Santa Barbara Independent has the 
following from its San Luis Obispo corre- 
spondent regarding the intended refinery of 
the Graciosa Oil Company on San Luis Bay : 
"The Graciosa Oil Company has completed 
the purchase of the water front property on 
San Luis Bay by coming to an agreement 
with Mrs. M. G. Martinez, who owned forty 
acres that the company desired. By pro- 
curing this property; the establishment of 
the refinery is made a certainty, and bids for 
the construction of a plant to cost $300,000 
will be asked for at once. Besides the re- 
finery, Manager L. A. Phillips stated the 
company would establish a brick yard and 
also make its own cans. A wharf will be 
constructed on the bay at the refinery site. 
Plans for the refinery will be drawn so as 
it can be enlarged at any time. The capacity 
will be 5000 barrels a day." 

Work in the field continues in its usual 
even tenor; the oil fields are still busy in 
their development work. The Union Oil 
Company has its several leases still boring 
their deep holes. The wells in proven terri- 
tory are very readily bored, notwithstanding 
their depth, easier than those in other lo- 
calities that are shallower. 

Of the special work in the field, the Clare- 
mont Oil Company are through their fishing 
job and are going down and are probably 
2500 feet. 

The Los Alamos Developing Company, 
the deepest well in the field, is 4300 feet deep 
and gives the highest oil of any, being of 
35 degrees gravity. The well flows, but not 
as much as at first. Still it is good for 250 
barrels per day. 

The Lompoc Oil Development Company 
is at last showing up oil in increasing quan- 
tity. These are all deep wells and small 
showings will not pay for boring, hence they 
are bored deeper till the accumulated oil 
sands increase the yield. 

The Recruit Company are reported to 
have a good well on the Newhall lease, about 
twelve miles southwest of Santa Maria. This 
company has skirmished around the outside 
of the main oil belt and has not met with 



the success they have elsewhere in the 1 

Angeles or Kern fields. 

Pinal are going down in No. 11 shaft aboul 
Feet. No. 2 Pinal and No, _■ Brookshire 
are being deepened. Rice Ranch and Penn- 
sylvania are Hearing the oil belt. The town 
of Orcutt keeps busy; more buildings and 
work by the Union Oil Company. 



OIL AND MINING NOTES. 



The schooner Monterey was cleared last 
Monday for Honolulu, via Monterey, with 
19,000 barrels crude oil, in bulk valued at 
$26,400, as its cargo. The cargo is to be 
laden at Monterey. 

The steamer Roanoke, under command of 
Captain R. J. Dunham, sailed last Saturday 
for Eureka, Coos Bay and Portland, after 
having been repaired, following the loss of 
rudder and rudder-post as a result of strik-.* 
^ing on Humboldt bar on November 27th 
last. The Roanoke was also converted into 
an oil burner during her enforced idleness 
in port. 

Standard Oil Company has gone into the 
business of building steel vessels at Point 
Richmond, where it was not believed that 
any shipyard existed. The Standard Oil 
Company has just turned out a handsome 
steel barge, 90,000 gallons capacity, built 
at its Point Richmond station, and last week 
the barge, named the Benicia, was brought 
down to the city, bedecked with flags. The 
vessel will be used in transporting oil be- 
tween the city and up-river points. 

The deepest well ever drilled in America 
has been sunk by an oil company at West 
Elizabeth, Pa., twelve miles from Pittsburg, 
to a depth of 6,000 feet. It was started 100 
feet below the Pittsburg coal vein. There 
was only one string of casing in the well, it 
being 6*4 inches and 900 feet deep. At the 
depth of 2285 feet a flow of gas was struck, 
which was sufficient to make steam to drill 
the rest of the hoie. Of 5500 feet the tem- 
perature was 129 degrees. At that rate heat 
equal to the boiling point of water — 212 de- 
gress — would be found at the depth of 9000 
feet. 

The Union Oil Company of California has 
moved its San Francisco offices from the 
seventh to the second floor of the Mills 
building. The new offices are much more 
commodious than the ones formerly occu- 
pied and are intended to meet the require- 
ments of the rapidly growing business of 
the company. The general office of the 
Union Steamship Company is included in 
the suite occupied by the Union Oil Com- 
pany. 

The Bullfrog West Extension in their 
shaft at 70 feet struck a big ledge of ore 
much of which shows free gold. This is the 
same ledge as found in the Bullfrog Ex- 
tension shaft Xo. 2 that is 150 feet east, and 
is believed to be the same as that found 
in the Original Bullfrog and Bullfrog Frac- 



8 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



tion lying south about 250 feet. For some 
reason the management of the Bullfrog West 
Extension saw fit to put the ore back in the 
shaft and have removed the windlass. Their 
reason for doing so is not known. They are 
now opening up work on one of their other 
claims, about 600 feet south. 

The Bullfrog Extension in their main in- 
cline shaft at a depth of 210 feet have begun 
cross-cutting to the foot-wall of the ledge 
they have been following. The ledge at this 
point is 42 feet wide, carrying average mill- 
ing values, with some very high shipping 
values. Up to this point this big ledge had 
a pitch of about 18 degrees, but is now cut- 
ting a sharper angle of probably 45 degrees. 
In their vertical shaft about 1200 feet west, 
at a depth of no feet, they struck the main 
ledge, and at 135 feet the shaft is still in 
a very fine appearing quartz, with green 
staine, which is the same as found in the 
Original Bullfrog. The last assay obtained 
on the shipping grade ore was $126 per ton. 
When the foot-wall of the ledge is reached 
in this shaft, cross-cutting will commence. 

The Orignal Bullfrog. — The force at this 
mine will be materially increased in a short 
time. It is currently reported and generally 
believed, though the facts cannot be veri- 
fied, that Charles M. Schwab and associates 
are negotiating for the Orignal Bullfrog, 
Bullfrog Extension and Bullfrog West Ex- 
tension. These three companies own the 
nine claims on Original Mountain, which 
was the first discovery of Bullfrog. It would 
be a very good thing for the camp generally 
if these properties were combined in one 
strong company that would enter upon one 
uniform system of development work and 
develop the enormous ore bodies already 
opened up on these properties. 

Apex. — What is known as the Apex Frac- 
tion is a small piece of ground of a few 
acres lying between the Original Bullfrog 
and Bullfrog West Extension. It is reported 
that this property will be the subject of 
active litigation at an early date. This small 
piece of ground was purchased by T. L. Od- 
die and associates, who, it is believed, will 
enjoin the Apex Mining Company from fur- 
ther developing the property until the matter 
of title is adjusted. 

The Big Bullfrog, lying south of these 
properties, is carrying forward its work and 
have opened up ledge No. 2 of about 12 feet 
of $12 ore. 

The Goldfrog Big C, which joins the Bull- 
frog Extension on the north and west, at 
235 feet in the tunnel, struck a ledge of four 
feet of low grade milling ore in this ledge. 
At an early date this company will begin 
to develop their other two claims at the foot 
of Bonanza Mountain, as this property joins 
the Rush claims which were recently bonded 
for $125,000. 

The following oil dividends have been de- 
clared : Peerless, 14 cents, payable Feb. 16; 
Oil City Petroleum, 1 cent, payable March 
1 ; Twenty-Eight, 10 cents, payable March 
1st. 

The deal between the Southwestern Oil 
Refining Company and Secretary Liscomb 
of the Independent Oil Producers' Agency 
and E. E. Jones has been closed and the 
deed for the refinery was filed to-day. The 
papers transferring the property were re- 
ceived by Liscomb and Jones on Monday. 



Lacy Manufacturing Company 

Manufacturers of 

Steel Water Pipe 
General Sheet 
Iron Works 
Oil Well Casing 
Oil Stills 

OIL STORAGE AND WAGON TANKS 

s: Cor. New Main and Date streets, P. O. Box 231, Station C 

Baker Block Telephone Main 196 

Office, 334 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Cal, 





TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 


TANKS 



ANY KIND -ANY SIZE-ANY NUMBER-ANY WHERE 



TANKS 
TANKS 
TANKS 



TANKS 
TANKS 
TANKS 



TANKS 
TANKS 
TANKS 



TANKS 
TANKS 
TANKS 



W. GRAVER TANK WORKS 

1409-11 Great Northern Bldg., Chicago 



^mok^ 




Warren 



Or^ANyJSAeAGJ TV 



HiO. 



' : ^-' ,w *^ - ; ' -J '■ v '-■,'■■ 



xnr 



'^W J % n ^ 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
W. K. Oil Company, ;i corporation; prin- 
cipal place of business San Francisco; loca- 
•f property, Fresno County, California. 
Notice i- hereby given that at a meeting 
of the director--, held on the 12th day of 
February, 1906, an assessment of two cents 
share was levied on the capital 
stock of the W. K. < HI Company, payable 
immediately to J. VV. Pauson, secretary, at 
the office of the company, room 501, 1'ar- 
rott building. Any stock upon which this 
-mem sliall remain unpaid on the 25th 
<lav of March, ti>o(>, will be delinquent and 
advertised for sale at public auction, and, 
unless payment is made before, will be sold 
on the 17th day of April, [906, to pay the 
delinquent assessment, together with the 
costs of advertising and expenses of sale. 
J. W. PAL'Sl >N, Secretary. 
Levied February 12. 
Delinquent March 25. 
Sale April 17. 



MAPS. 

Up-to-date, white-print official maps of 

Goldfield and Bullfrog. Size 20x30 inches. 

Answers purpose of maps costing $2.50 to $5 

each. 25 cents each. Stamps taken. 

DEBENTURE SURETY COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 

Suite A 10, Rialto Building, 

San Francisco - California 



LATEST QUOTATIONS. 

Following are the latest quotations for 
California crude oil at the wells as offered 
by the recognized buyers : 
Coalinga. 
22 deg. up to, not including 24 deg. $0.20 

24 deg. up to, not including 25 deg .22 1 /i> 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 25 

Higher prices paid to favored companies 

on long time contracts. 

Kern River. 
No established quotation, price subject to 
contract with marketers. 

Santa Maria. 

24 deg. up to, but not including 25. . .20 

25 deg. gravity or lighter 22% 

Higher prices paid on long time conttacts. 

Eastern Quotations. 

Tiona $1.68 

Pennsylvania 1.58 

Second Sand 1 . 58 

Corning 1 . 10 

Newcastle 1.35 

Cabell 1. 18 

North Lima 94 

South Lima 89 

Indiana 89 

Somerset 89 

Ragland 49 

Corsicana, light 89 

Corsicana, heavy 50 

Canada 1 . 34 

Kansas Fuel Oil 35 

30 to 30V2 gravity 40 

301/2 to 31 gravity 43 

31 to 31V2 gravity 46 

3 1 1 2 to 32 gravity 49 

32 gravity and over 52 

Texas. 

Humble 34 

Batson, 22 35 

Batson, heavy 32 

Saratoga 34 

Sour Lake, 22 40 

Sour Lake, heavy 32 

Spindletop 45 



GOLDFROG BIG C 



tin the propert) north of the Original Bullfrog and Bullfrog Extension, at 235 

feet from the mouth of the tunnel, a second [edge has been struck on which the\ are 
now drifting. The company also owns four claims at Goldfield and two additional 
claims at Bullfrog at the foot of Bonanza Mountain. Ail property paid for. no debts. 
The block of 50,000 shares to be sold at 6 cents is going rapidly, several big orders by 
wire the past few days. The next block of stock will be 10 cents per share or more. 
It is one of the best low-priced stocks of Nevada. Detailed information on request. 

A first-class proposition ; a clean promotion ; every share treasury stock, no free 
stock; handled by honest men on a business basis. 

A chance to realize big profits on a smail amount of money. Remit for a block 
of this stock at once. 

DEBENTURE SURETY CO. 

Alfl Rialto Building, ■:= San Francisco, Cal. 

BARLOW & HILL 

The up-to-date Map Makers 

BAKERSFIBLD, - - CALIFORNIA 

INVESTMENTS 



4000 Shares in the Famous Brookshire Oil Co. 

in the Santa Maria District — Company out of debt. — Has two gushers sell- 
ing oil enough to pay running expenses and development work. — Negotiat- 
ing for a contract with the Standard and shortly will pay monthly divi- 
dends of one per cent. — Will sell this block of stock if disposed of im- 
mediately at $1.00 per share. — Stand ng price $1.25. 

Stock in the San Jose Cremation Association 

The first allotment is going and will soon be gone, when a second installment 
will be offered at $15.00, to be followd bv a third at $20. Parties wishing 
to invest at bed-rock should buy now, while first allotment is offered. 

A few shares of Oakland Cremation Association 

stock at a bargain for immediate sale. 

$5000 to $10,000 Realty Syndicate Certificates at 92c. 
Marconi Wireless Telegraph Stock at $5 per share. 

But best of all 

Turlock and Modesto Irrigation Bonds 

5 per cent, $400 and $5000 each. These bonds can be bought at par and 
yield respectively semi-annual interest of $10 and $12.50 each, January 1st and 
July 1st without interruption till redemption begins, January 1st, 1922, the 
last continuing till January 1st, 1942. These yield larger returns than Gov- 
ernment interest bonds and are equally secure. 

W. E. BARNARD, 

476 Tenth St., Oakland, Cal. 



10 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CALIFORNIA STOCK AND OIL 
EXCHANGE. 



Following are the stock sales on the 
California Stock and Oil Exchange in the 
formal sessions held for the week ending 
Wednesday, February 14th : 

Associated — 

5000 shares at 49 

5326 shares at 50 

Independence — 

1000 shares at 

1000 shares at ■ 

Monte Cristo — 

1000 shares at 

200 shares at 

Oil City Petroleum— 

1500 shares at 

Peerless — 

50 shares at 7 . 25 

Twenty-Eight — 

20 shares at 6.00 

Thirty-Three— 

500 shares at 



.10 

. 11 

.70 
■75 

.68 



5.00 



Following are the latest quotations for 
stocks of oil companies listed on the Cali- 
fornia Stock and Oil Exchange : 

Bid. 

Alma 25 

Arline 41 

Apollo 05 

Asso. Oil Stk. Tr. Cer. . .50 

Aztec 12 

California-Standard ... .37 

Caribou 5. 00 

Central Point Com 1 . 75 

Chicago Crude 40 

Chicago Crude (New).. .07 

Claremont 

Forty 

Four 28 

Giant 50 

Hanford 260.00 

Home 40 

Homestake 42 

Illinois Crude 

Imperial 

Independence 09 

Junction 

Kaweah .40 

Kern (New) 

Kern River 



90 
45 



Linda Vista 

McKittrick 

Monarch of Arizona. . . . 

Monte Cristo 

Occidental of W. Va 



.08 

.08 

■15 
.70 

■03 



Oil City Petroleum 60 



7.00 

•05 

. 10 

.26 

1.50 

1.60 



Peerless 
Piedmont . 
Radium . . 
Reed Crude 
Senator . . 
Senator . 

Shawmut 

Sovereign 20 

Sterling 1.25 

Superior 05 

Thirty-Three 5. 00 

Toltec 60 

Twenty-Eight 6.00 

Union 163 . 00 

Wabash . 

West Shore 1 . 50 

West Shore 1 . 70 

Wolverine ?' 



J. S. EWEN 

CHARTER MEMBER 

S. F. & Tonopah Mining Exchange 

AH "listed" TONOPAH, GOLD- 
FIELD, BULLFROG, Etc., STOCKS, 
BOUGHT AND SOLD at CLOSEST 
MARKET PRICE. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED 

Use "Western Union Code** 

318 Pine St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone Main 1552 



Flow of Natural Gas 
Increased by . . . 

Cooper's Gas Lift 

Also flow of water 
or oil Increased and 
gas saved 

A. S. COOPER, C.E., 

219 Crocker Building 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Ask 


ed. 
.50 




.08 

5i 


7 


42 
00 


1 


09 
OS 
5° 
35 




50 


15 


20 
00 
11 
20 


6 


10 
50 


9 


15 
16 

75 
04 

65 
00 
07 
20 
28 


2 
6 


40 

25 
00 
10 
00 


6 
165 

2 
1 
1 


50 
00 

35 
00 

85 

00 




WM. WALLACE B. W. CHARLESWORTH 

WALLACE & CHARLfiSWORTH 

PLUMBERS, TINNERS AND 

Galvanized Tank Builders 

Everything in Plumbing, Tin and Sheet Iron Work 

Estimates Furnished on all Kinds of Work 



Oil Tanks, Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Wagon Tanks, 
Toilets, Pumps, Water 
Barrels, Lavatories, Wind Mills 

COALINGA, CAL. 



P&B 



Agent of 

Roofing 

PAINTS 



CONTRACT [ 

Drilling deep wells 
for Oil or Water 

Furnish Complete 

Plants for Drilling 

Prices Reasonable 

BOX "7 




WANTED 



W. E. YOULE 



Good Second hand 
Rigs 

OH Well Tools 

Oil Well Casing and 
Pipe 

Engines and Boilers 

Fishing Tools 

SAN LOUIS OBISPO, CAL 



FRESNO COUNTY ABSTRACT COMPANY 

Incorporated Under the Laws of California January 21, 1901. 

Capital Stock $100,000.00 



FULLY PAID UP 

SEARCHERS OF RECORDS AND CONVEYANCE 



Abstracts of Title Carefully Compiled at Reasonable Rates. 



NO. 1115 K ST., 



FRESNO, CAL. 






PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



Private Rooms Phone Main 5966 Jules Wittmann 

JULES 1 RESTAURANT 



315-317-319-321-323 

PIKE ST., S. F. 



ilar Dinner with Wine, .75 
Sundays and Holidays, $1.00 



Open Evenings 
Music Sundays 






. . ■ V./I Y ■ . . 

Livery, Feed and Sale Stable 

DAVIS, ELY & GATHER, Proprietor 
FIRST CLASS TURNOUTS 

AT REGULAR UNION RATES 
NEW RIGS OF ALL KINDS 

Coalinga, California 



SEVENTEEN [17] NEW 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITERS 

SOLD XO 

Viva Co Five (5) 

U. S. Signal Corpse Four (4) 

Hills Bros Four (4) 

Metropolitan Laundry Cn. .Four (4) 




Also XJseA by 

STANDARD OIL CO. 
POSTAL TELEGRAPH CO. 
FAIRBANKS, MORSE CO. 
UNION TRUST BANK 



17 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE FREE 

L. <a M. ALEXANDER <a CO. 

IIO Montgomery Street 

Branches: Portland Los Angeles Seattle 




WHEELER & WILSON MT'G CO. 

231 Sutter Street 
iSan Francisco 

Headq uarters P aCl f lC COCtSt 




11 

- -MAPS-- 

ALL KINDS OF MAPS 

Small Maps Large Maps Indexed Maps 

Blue Prints White Prints 

Printed Maps 

Coalinga Blue Prints #1.50 

Kern River " " 1 .50 

McKittrick " " 1.50 

Sunset — Midway " " 1.50 

Santa Maria " " :)6x6o 5.00 

Prices on other maps or special work 
quoted on application. 

ACCURACY OUR MOTTO 

Pacific Oil Reporter 

318 Pine Street 
San Francisco, California 



Rifles, Pistols, Shotguns, 

arc perfect in every respect. The sportsman Is never 
disappointed in the working of liis (run if it's a STEV- 
ENS — they are safe, strong, accurate, durable, and 
convenient to handle. 

We will send von our valuable uo-page bonk, tell- 
ing' all about STEVENS arms, shooting, hunting. 
notes on the proper care of a gun, sights, etc., if you 
will send 4 ceDts in stamps. 

FREE rUZZXJE! Write for the rifle puzzle; 
most fascinating. 

Ask your dealer, and insist on the STEVENS. If 
you cannot obtain them, w ship direct, express pre- 
paid, on receipt of catalog price. 

J. STEVENS ARMS AND TOOL CO., 



Go 



to the 



PACIFIC , REPORTER 

oIl 



San Francisco* Cal. 



I for your 



Job p rinting 



BEST WORK - ' 
LOWEST PRICES 



PAUL W. PRUTZMAN 

113 New Montgomery Street 

ANALYSIS AND REFINING 
TESTS OF PETROLEUM 
ANALYSIS OF ASPHALT & 
FAT & LUBRICATING OILS 

Tel. Mint 2791 San Francisco 



A. ZELLERBAGH & SONS 

THE PAPER HOUSE 
416-418-420-422-424-426 SANSOME ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Paper aud Paper Bags, Twine and Supplies el every 
description incidental In Me trade. We carry 
the Largest Stock. Our Prices are Equitable 

Telephone Private Ex! 14 



PATENTS 

United States and Foreign 
Trade Marks Registered 

J. Ml. NESBIT, Attorney 

921 Park Bldg, Pittsburg, Pa. 



Orj* Star JDrilluts !tftacl)utc 

Cut shows boiler mounted upon frame The Portable Rig which has placed upon a lower plane the expense of op- 
of machine for oil and gas works. It erating for oil or gas. 
is usually advisable to have boiler 

mounted upon trucks separate. ' ts tests range from shallow water wells to a limit of 2825 feet in depth, but 

it is especially recommended for work under 1500 feet and can handle easily 
1000 feet of casing. 

One No. 4 machine has a record of Thirty-two 800-foot holes in one year. 

Made in Sizes to Suit Territory 

The only machine made that is absolutely without annoying springs. 
They are simple, powerful and efficient, easy to handle at work or on the 
road. Used in every State and Territory and in many foreign countries. 

We also make full line of Drilling and Fishing Tools, Reamers, Sand Pumps, 
Spuds, etc. 

Descriptive catalogue mailed free. 




STAR DRILLING MACHINE COMPANY 



AKRON, OHIO 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



CABLE ADDRESS 



" ASPHALTAGE " 



WESTERN UNION CODE 



(TaUfonua .Asp fyaltum 



Sales ^Ageitc? 






™=MALTHA 



BRAND 



PRODUCERS OF ALL GRADES OF 



REFINED ASPHALTUM 

99 Per Cent Pure, Uniform Quality, Unlimited Supply 
Term Contracts for Large Quantities Solicited 
Write for Samples and Information 



g e: n e: r a i_ o f fi c e: s 



MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

JOHN BAKER, Jr., Manager 

NEW YORK OFFICE ZZZZZZZI CHICAGO OFFICE 



WHITEHALL BLDG., 17 Battery Place 



RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG. 



"When writing to advertisers, please mention The Pacific Oil Reporter. 



Read 

Sunset Magazine 

and 

Send it East 



No other magazine describee 
California and the great West so 
well; none is mora beautifully illu- 
strated. 

All Newsdealers sell it, because 
It is read everywhere. 

One Dollar a year. 

Ten cents a copy. 



Business Office 

431 California Street, 

San Francisco 



SAVE MONEY AND BOILERS 

Save Your Lubricating Oils. Economize Fuel. 
Prevent Scale, Corrosion and Pitting. 
NnSCAI.F EUCALYPTUS BOILER COMPOUND. 



NOSCALE ADOPTED BY THE U. S. GOVERNMENT 

At Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Just the Thing to Remove Scale Formed From Alkali Water. 



OIL PRODUCERS ARE ALL MAKING TESTS 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BARRELS ARE BRANDED NOSCALE. 



Address all communications to: 

ADOLPH L. STONE, Sales Manager 

California Engineers Supply Co., 
315 California St., 
Phone James 7116 Sa " Francisco, Cal. 

SMITH, EMERY & CO. 

Chemists and Chemical Engineers 

ANALYSIS, TBSTS, INSPECTIONS 




Petroleum, Kerosene, 

Asphalt, Minerals; Metals; 
Cement; Water; Earths; 
Stone; Gases Salts; Clay 



Tank Cars and Oil Ships sampled 
and inspected. 

83-85 New Montgomery Street 

S^kJV FRANCISCO 








Vol. 7, No. 17. San Francisco, Cal., February 24. 1Q06. 



Price lO Cents. 




SCENE IN THE OIL FIELDS OF JAPAN. 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 



ESTABLISHED |857\ 



A.LESCHEN &S0NS ROPE CO 

920-932 NORTH FIRST ST. 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 






BRANCH OFFICES S WAREHOUSES: 
NEW YORK •• CHICAGO •■ DENVER. 



WIRE ROPE LESCHEM'S 

OF EVERY DRILLING CAB LES a* ° SAND LINES, 

DESCRIPTION. a^°CASING A H P TUBING LINES. 




WE ARE AGENTS FOR 



LESCHEN LINES... R. H. HERRON COMPANY 

AND OARRY THEM IN STOCK AT 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

3oser>l) 3\ei& (has TEnairte (To* 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

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The only reverse gear 
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OOOOOOOOOOi - "OOOOOOOPOOOO oow 

ing tubing and rods, 
in fact any work that 
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FOR PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 

WILLIAM M. GRAHAM 

Pacific Coast Agent - - Coalinga, California 



PACIFIC OIL REPORTER 

Volume 7. San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, February 24, 1906 Number 17 

D i PITIP fill DCDADTCD Like a thief >n the night he evades the eye gentlemen: 

rAUIrlb U1L nLrUnltn of thepublic . goesaboardavesseldestined Kern River-WiUiam EUery, F. N. Sco- 

Published Weekly. fi Id H s Bridge, L. P. St. Clair, W. A. 

„. ._.. ..... » .. t, .- ,* tnr a foreign country and thus evades the 6 ' ' "" 

The Oil Authority of the Pacific Coast. Ferguson E. E Tones 

, , . . _ ... • t. i i w • exposure that would inevitably follow _ ,. „,».-.., . . „ „ „ 

Indorsed by California Petroleum Miners / Coalinga— S. W. Morsehead, T. R. Turner, 

As sociatio n. should he he brought into court. Banish- Sam shannonj John Hink , e; Dan Finn> H R 

m ■ d m- r. •. ment from one's country would ordinarily Hart, H. H. Welch, A. V. Lisenby. 

Maria K. \\ inn. Proprii J 

E. S. Eastman, Editor and Manager. he one °^ tne most sevre punishments pos- McKittrick — A. N. Lewis, S. P. Wible. 

Karl R. Eastman Field Manager sible to impose, but a man of the criminal Sunset — J. E. Segur, C. A. Barlow. 

instincts with which John D. Rockefeller is Santa Maria — Ben Liebes, J. F. Goodwin. 

Office and Editorial Rooms ,. , . ... , , , ... , . , „ _, _ . 

318 Pine Street San Francisco. California accredited is not likely to look with any Los Angeles-C. E. Price. 

Telephone Bush 176. great regret upon even a permanent exile » 

TERMS fr ° m h ' S " atiVe la " d ' T ' ie Pr ° Per an?i Wdl At the P resent time there are tw0 bills 

One Year $2 . 50 earned place for Rockefeller is behind prison before ^ natJonal ]egis , ative body designed 

Six Months 1.50 bars and he well knows it or he wouldn't 

Tliroe Arnnilic t on to give the mining industry the assistance 

three Months 1.00 fiee f rom a sim pi e i nves tigation into his bust- & 8 y 

Single Copies 10 _ _ . that it is entitled to. One of these bills was 

_, . p q, ness connections, b light is prima facie ev> 
oreign os age . ' ' " " • "" dence q{ - h R is SQ considere d in every introduced by Congressman Brooks, of Col- 
Advertising Rates on Request. Q ,,,,,«-. 
court of justice in the land. If the Garfield orado, and the other by Congressman Van 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, i nves tigation does not show Standard Oil Duzer, of Nevada. Mr. Brooks' bill is a 

Draft, or Registered Letter, addressed to ... . ■ „ T 1. 

Pacific Oil Reporter, 318 Pine Street, San Company, its directors, and especially John step ; n the right d i rec tion, but the bill of 

Francisco, rooms 3.1-3*33- Communications D. Rockefeller, the most fraudulent and dis- Mf _ Van Duz£r ig the Qne that thg mim 

must be accompanied by writers name and , 10nest combmation in modern times then . : 

address, not necessarily for publication, but men of the West are fighting for. 1 he 

as a guarantee of good faith. it will have failed in its purpose. ,,..„.,' . , • • iL 

& Brooks bill is for a bureau of mines in the 

cSSttTJ:££^£ Ft ^ The California Oil Producers' Association Department of the Interior. It wou.d ap- 

= has called a meeting of directors for March pear that the administration is behind this 

Mr. Karl R. Eastman has been engaged to ^ at Qne O ' clock P M Same will be held in bill for the reason that the concession for a 

represent the Pacific Oil Reporter in the ca- the c;ty of San Francisco , wh ere the perma- Department of Mines and Mining asked for 

pacity of field manager. Mr. Eastman will nmt headqllafters of the assoc iation will be in the V an Duzer bill is considered too great 

devote the first few months of his time to j t d Several matters of importance will _ . • 

„ ...... ^ ',. 1 , i 1 , a. one. The American Mining Congress. 

the Coalinga district, exclusively; later he CQme up be f ore th ; s meeting principal of 

will take up the work in other districts. which fa the dection of officers . It js current i v '»« an institution of national importance, is 

Any courtesy that may be shown Mr. East- d ^ Mr _ g w Mo - rsehead is the fighting for the Van Duzer bill, as are the 

man in the gathering of authentic data will , ar cand;date fo ,. p resident , and lt is more fining interests of the nation. However 

, . , • ,. , , , , if the Brooks' bill is passed -mining men will 

be duly appreciated. than probable that he will be named for that c F . 6 

c , be satisfied for the time being. This bill 

office. Mr. Morsehead has been an earnest, 

_.,.„, ■., •• , ... will prove the wedge that will open the way 

The wicked flee when no man persueth, i oya i worker for the organization since it was r ° 

... T . , , • . .,,„ ,,-,,. for a department and a cabinet officer. A 

says the good book. Interpreted .nto the nrst suggested, and he has been, to a very great 

. , , . • , ,. p . . . . . department of this kind could do a wonder- 
language as it is used to-day this might ex tent, the means of its success in bringing to- . 

mean- "There is nothing that will chase a gether, in one enthusiastic body, the independ- M work for the mimn S lnterests of the 

man so hard as his guilty conscience." John ent producers of the State. Mr. Morsehead's entire country. It is a fact that the mining 

D Rockefeller is said to be in Naples. He popularity in the Coalinga field, in which he industry furnishes the railroads of the na- 

caught the "European Malady" and there is principally interested, is best illustrated by tion with 52 per cent of their traffic. There 

was no holding him. As much, as he loved the fact that in the balloting for directors he is no good reason why the mining industry 

his country, his flag, and more than either, received an unanimous vote. He was the only should not be taken care of the same as 

. , . • j are the agricultural interests. This depart- 

his rotten oil trust his maniatic instincts got director on the ticket who received an imam- are tne agncunuiai 

the better of him and it became a case of mous vote from his representative district. "tent would take in the entire industry, in- 

"Europe or bust." In Naples he can recover Out of the entire vote of the State he .ost eluding the precious metal mines coal 

his usual self repose and dictate the policy but eight votes. Mr. Morsehead is well de- mines, etc. It wou.d, to a great extent, free 

of Standard Oil from a foreign land. Like serving of the office of executive of the asso- the industry of the unscrupulous promote 

a common criminal he has banished himself elation, and it seems to us the moral duty of and make it possible to grea ly ,nc a 

from American soil to enjoy his loot in lands the directorate that he gets it unanimously. output ot the mines, and in turn add 

beyond the reach of the arm of the law. The directorate is compos